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Android phones and USB DACs - Page 163

post #2431 of 5297
Quote:
Originally Posted by jasonb View Post

Why are you worried about 24/96? 

 

Because I have hi-res music files, obviously.

post #2432 of 5297
Quote:
Originally Posted by nicks9 View Post

Does the Galaxy S4 support 24bit/96khz output to a DAC?

People keep saying that "it works" with all of these USB DACs like the E17, but I can't get 24/96 unless I use USB Audio Recorder Pro.

If someone could clarify, I would really appreciate it. I'm a bit confused here.

 

 

In order to interface to the 32/384 capable ALSA USB audio driver, generic music players have to use the Android media player framework which currently has some hi-res limitation instructions.

http://www.head-fi.org/t/595071/android-phones-and-usb-dacs/975#post_8940230

http://www.head-fi.org/t/595071/android-phones-and-usb-dacs/1005#post_8950416

 

 

 

 

The USB Audio Recorder PRO can play hi-res music files, because it doesn’t use the Android media player framework. It includes its own USB audio "soft driver".

http://www.head-fi.org/t/595071/android-phones-and-usb-dacs/1440#post_9084579

post #2433 of 5297
Ill try to verify it with the e17 I tested...I just borrowed that from my friend...was playing flac and wav tracks when I tested it
post #2434 of 5297
Quote:
Originally Posted by DanBa View Post

 

 

In order to interface to the 32/384 capable ALSA USB audio driver, generic music players have to use the Android media player framework which currently has some hi-res limitation instructions.

http://www.head-fi.org/t/595071/android-phones-and-usb-dacs/975#post_8940230

http://www.head-fi.org/t/595071/android-phones-and-usb-dacs/1005#post_8950416

 

 

 

 

The USB Audio Recorder PRO can play hi-res music files, because it doesn’t use the Android media player framework. It includes its own USB audio "soft driver".

http://www.head-fi.org/t/595071/android-phones-and-usb-dacs/1440#post_9084579

 

Thanks, that was really helpful.

I guess for now that particular app is the only way to do it. Too bad it has such minimal functionality as a player.

 

It's probably not a good idea to let it downsample the audio on the fly, right?

I can actually play hi-res on Poweramp with no problems, but the E17 shows it as 16/48.

post #2435 of 5297
Quote:
Originally Posted by jasonb View Post

Why are you worried about 24/96? 

Oh...Oh...let me guess...Perhaps he wants great sound?

post #2436 of 5297
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by James1776 View Post

Oh...Oh...let me guess...Perhaps he wants great sound?

 

Or at least hold his faith that he is hearing better sound...

post #2437 of 5297

Is there any doubt? perhaps on $3 earbuds but with any sort of a real system, Hi-Rez simply sounds better...

post #2438 of 5297

Maybe I just have hi-res music that I would rather not convert to a lesser quality for no reason.

It's funny that I have to defend myself on a site full of people who spend thousands of dollars on hi-fi equipment.

post #2439 of 5297

Hey guys, a couple pages back NZtechfreak talked about the Apex Glacier, RSA Intruder, and the HeadAmp Pico.

 

From my findings, all based on 32ohm headphone load (V-Moad M100) the Apex Glacier has 90mW output, RSA Intruder has 300-350mW output, and the HeadAmp Pico has 90mW or 700mW?! Can anyone clarify this?

 

From the HeadAmp website it says output of 0.7mW @ 32ohms, but that's pretty crazy. Can anyone tell me a solid answer?

post #2440 of 5297
"A plain "Shut up!" from Google on top starred Android issues"     [a rather severe judgment]
 
"Issue trackers are a great facility for getting feedback from the customer base. And they are a great facility for the customers to actually give feedback. But what if there are lots of customers who give feedback and nobody cares? Well, even in those cases issue trackers are great: You, as a customer, can clearly see how responsive the team behind the product is.
 
Let's take a look at two of Android's most starred issues:
Issue 24614: Add support for USB Audio
Issue 3434: Add APIs for low-latency audio
They are starred by 4904 and 2442 people and rank at place 4 and 7 on the list of Android's most starred  issues:
 

 

Not only do both issues have been starred by many people but there have also been lots of comments made in the issue tracker. But neither of both got even a single comment or response from the Android developers - until today!
 
An answer - finally
 
So great news: Google has responded! Yeah, finally, after 1332 comments on issue 24614 and 485 comments on 4855. And here's the long awaited answer from Google: Shut up!
 
Yes, that's it. No further comment. They haven't responded on issue 4855 for almost 4 years now and all they say is: Shut up! Is this really how they care for feedback?
 
OK, to be fair, they haven't literally said "Shut up!" they have just closed both issues for comments. But that isn't very different from "Shut up!".
 

 

To make it clear, most of the comments at least in #24614 are useless 'me too' comments. Nobody want to see them, that's what starring is for. But actually Google could have stopped this kind of comments by just answering even once. Just once! That would have been enough. Closing the "discussion" wihtout any further remarks is what makes it feel like a 'Shut up!' "

 

https://code.google.com/p/android/issues/detail?id=24614&sort=-stars&colspec=ID%20Type%20Status%20Owner%20Summary%20Stars

 

 

"Well, the USB Audio issue feels like it could've belonged at LG, or Asus or whoever the maker of each specific device happens to be.
It's the OEMs and platform vendors that actually implement the USB Audio support (I happened to be involved in this when I was at Sony Mobile).
Google (as of Android 4.1) essentially just provides some of the higher-level mechanisms for detection of USB Audio accessories, while the OEM / platform vendor fills in the blanks. Those blanks can either be very small if you only want audio output at a fixed sample rate, or they can grow quite big if you want more features like recording, voice calls, etc.
 
You could argue that Google should provide a complete basic solution for USB Audio, but that's not the setup today."
post #2441 of 5297

Wow, that's... upsetting. In that case, I'm even happier to throw a few bucks at whomever can figure out how to make USB audio a service that can be accessed by multiple players. $10? No problem. $20? Yeah, I'd probably do it. I just want SOMEBODY to make this work consistently...

post #2442 of 5297

Hey, be more positive,

maybe the Google team are just now dealing with the problem and preparing to give us a surpriseetysmile.gif

 

 

 

 

 

 

Okay, they probably won't, I knowconfused_face.gif

post #2443 of 5297
Quote:
Originally Posted by Theogenes View Post

Wow, that's... upsetting. In that case, I'm even happier to throw a few bucks at whomever can figure out how to make USB audio a service that can be accessed by multiple players. $10? No problem. $20? Yeah, I'd probably do it. I just want SOMEBODY to make this work consistently...

 

Well, I'm going to do just that, starting in a couple of weeks...

post #2444 of 5297
Quote:
Originally Posted by DanBa View Post
 
"Google (as of Android 4.1) essentially just provides some of the higher-level mechanisms for detection of USB Audio accessories, while the OEM / platform vendor fills in the blanks. Those blanks can either be very small if you only want audio output at a fixed sample rate, or they can grow quite big if you want more features like recording, voice calls, etc.

 

To take away the misconception of a lot of people: Google did not provide higher-level mechanisms for detection of USB audio devices as we know them. They only provided something for USB devices that work in 'accesorry mode': "USB accessory mode allows users to connect USB host hardware". That's right: 'host' hardware, so the audio device would be the host and your Android device would be the slave. There are hardly any devices around that work like this: all USB audio devices are slaves where the Android devices must function as the host, hence the needed OTG cable.

post #2445 of 5297
Quote:
Originally Posted by eXtream View Post

Well, I'm going to do just that, starting in a couple of weeks...

 

Man, as soon as you have that sucker finished, I am absolutely THERE. Really glad to hear this and can't wait to see what you come up with!! 

 

Waiting with baited (or maybe just "bad") breath ;)

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