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On/Off for Solid State Amp

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 

 

Is it good practice to leave solid state amps, CD players etc on all the time? 

post #2 of 13

Most will be quite happy with it: if you're worried about them getting too hot then turn them off when you're not using them.

post #3 of 13
Thread Starter 

hi Willakan

 

Thanks for your feedback.Will try to leave my V200 on all the time then, I was told switching SS on/ off wears the transistors out. thats why PCs are best left turned on. However, I was also told the SS components have a certain life usage lifespan thus having it on will make them wear out faster. Either way... the gear dies... Well.. I am trying to see which is the better way between the two!

post #4 of 13

Turn it off when you aren't in home or you sleep. Keep it on if you're around the house.

post #5 of 13
Thread Starter 

Ok Thanks for suggestion.

post #6 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by nsk1 View Post

Turn it off when you aren't in home or you sleep. Keep it on if you're around the house.



X2 Powered electronics are potential fire hazard, so power them off if you can't keep an eye on 'em.

Your power bill and the environment would prefer if you powered down your electronics when you are not using it, solid state gear will last a long time even if they have a lot of power cycles behind them.

post #7 of 13

Quote:

Originally Posted by YOONG 2112 View Post
I was told switching SS on/ off wears the transistors out. thats why PCs are best left turned on. However, I was also told the SS components have a certain life usage lifespan thus having it on will make them wear out faster.

 

The only components that should see real stress from turning on devices is the power supply [Inrush current hits that first and capacitors and if it's a nice power supply inductors limit voltage spikes and the inrush of current to the devices it powers].  It should be fine long as you aren't turning it off and on like a kid with a light switch (like a strobe light).  The in rush of current is damaging. The best example of this is light bulbs (in the house [car ones are susceptible to damage due to vibrations (different factor)].  The less you turn on and off the light the longer it lasts.  Keeping it on or off isn't a big issue for lights (equally as long lasting).  I try to limit turning on and off of devices, but if I'm not going to use it for long periods of times or I leave for longer than 2-4 hours I turn it off.  These devices should last decades and decades if not longer if it's well designed regardless of what you do.  I personally see it being a  bit better to turn it off and risk it, because the power grid is less than perfect.  It occasionally goes high and low.  It gets worse in the summer months.  Not to mention power outages are very bad for electronics, specially when it comes back on (power is pretty dirty when it comes back).  Highs (voltage) is bad for the reason it will reduce life of the components depending on the power supply design and specs of the components [potentially].  But lows or brownouts are even worse, you might think oh it's just a reduction in voltage, how can that be bad? The reduction of current causes current to shoot up causing damage to the components.  If it's high enough you can melt the enamel insulation off the windings of your transformer [same thing happens when you under-volt a motor], at which point you have a dead short and I hope your breaker or fuse trips.  [Fuses in your device should add another level of protection].  Some devices are better at accepting these issues better than others.  Most of the time your devices live through both of the above situations and it's only rarely that a device just dies; but that doesn't mean you aren't doing harm.  You can fix the last two issues with power conditioning, to a point, but that's expensive, I just find it easier to not running my devices longer than I need.

 

For electronics if the silicon components are kept with in specs for power requirements and heat (operating temperatures) [when running, and with in specs for storage] it should last a very very long time.  Potentially longer than you.  It's polarized capacitors I worry about.  ESR will increase with age and extreme heat.  But I think I'm just over worrying about a non-issue when it comes to ESR.

 

As for fire risk, if it's a well designed and a proven design and/or has been certified then there should really be no chance of fire if it's properly cased, not covered in crap (like an amp buried in paper or fabrics).  Air flow is important on all sides.  If all that's been met, then I feel there is no risk of fire whatsoever.  We are way past the days of the paper capacitors.... [They started fires when they failed a lot of times].

 

Best advice, do what feels right to you.  You'll probably out live the device rather than see it die [Replaced with something better].  I have electronics older than me that still work.

 

 

 

 

 

Just my 2 cents as a studiying electric engineer technician - industrial student.


Edited by TheKisho - 2/3/12 at 1:13pm
post #8 of 13

A lot of audiophiles have tendency to leave their SS gear on 24/7 and according to them , the components will be ready ( less warm up time) and sound better than a cold start. Also, SS components tend to last longer without the on/off several time a day.

 

 

I bought for my son a mid-price Pioneer AVR about 7 yeras ago. He has been using it for gaming and he left it on 24/7 and to my amaze, 'till today, it is still working as it should. The only thing that I concern about is the heat generate from heavy duty amplifier running class A will eventually shorten the life span of the electrolyte capacitors. These capacitors are the first thing to go on these class A amp.

 

Again, I am not an EE, so other may chime in. This is just my own experience . BTW, I turn off all my equipments be it laptop, PC, or tablet after each usage and there is no problem so far.

post #9 of 13

My Schiit Asgard consumes 23-24 watts. Electric charges in San Diego, CA are .1433 $/kwh. If I leave it on all year the cost is $28.80 dollars or $2.36/month. Quite high for a single device. My total monthly bill is $36 - $38. I turn the Asgard off when not in use.

post #10 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by BrunoS72 View Post
.......Electric charges in San Diego, CA are .1433 $/kwh......... My total monthly bill is $36 - $38........


Do you live in a one room shack with only an amp and light bulb?  That's extremely low, for such a high rate.  I'm impressed that you managed to use so little.

post #11 of 13
Is the Asgard folding in its spare time? Sucking down all that energy is probably why it runs so hot. My O2 doesn't even get warm. On-Topic: It's never been shut off.
post #12 of 13

I left my amp on for a weekend, and the box was still cool. It also depends on the weather where you live. 

post #13 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheKisho View Post


Do you live in a one room shack with only an amp and light bulb?  That's extremely low, for such a high rate.  I'm impressed that you managed to use so little.


 

Two room shack actually. No A/C or central heating. All electronic devices and appliances are low power.  I have measured their power consumption. The fridge is the worst at US$9/month.

 

BTW I drive a Prius.

 

Currently I am turning the Asgard on/off but the back panel power switch makes this awkward. It should have been in the front.

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