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BSG Technologies QOL Signal Completion Stage

post #1 of 19
Thread Starter 

I read an interesting initial review of this item by Robert Harley and I was curious to know if anyone has listened to it, whether in a speaker setup or headphone.

 

http://www.bsgt.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/09/tas_feb2012_review.pdf


Edited by Merck - 1/30/12 at 8:05pm
post #2 of 19

some infos here :http://forum.audiogon.com/cgi-bin/fr.pl?htech&1319920176&openfrom&1&4#1

 

I still do not get how it works though..

post #3 of 19

Sounds like a load of BS to me

 

Actually now that I read the description of the patent in the article it sounds a lot like creating a stereoscopic video from a 2d video by showing one eye the current frame and the other eye a couple frames ahead or behind. The image has shifted between those frames giving the illusion of parallax, which our brain interprets as depth. So this is may actually do what it claims, make the sound seem as though it is coming from all sides, or at least something like a semi circle in front of you. Not sure why that would be desirable though...


Edited by bcg27 - 2/16/12 at 4:48pm
post #4 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by bcg27 View Post

Sounds like a load of BS to me

 

 



Yep.

 

post #5 of 19

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by jtwrace View Post



Yep.

 

 

Actually it has been a long time since a piece of equipment has caused so much controversy in the audio press. A lot like power cables and cryogenic treatments....also BS.

post #6 of 19

Seems it plays back louder for one thing, due to the mixing in of out-of-phase info, which confused even the reviewers. 

 

This is an interesting read: http://www.whatsbestforum.com/showthread.php?4384-Stereo-Field-Processing&highlight=Technology

post #7 of 19

I read the TAS and 6moons reviews and decided to give it the 30-day trial. To my eyes, it looked like the fundamentals are identified (more or less) by filtering different frequency bands out, then passing each through a set of phase shifts (like delays) and adding it all back together with a pass-through copy of the original signal for each channel. The end result would be similar to the reverb that sound engineers use to provide a matching "space" or ambience surrounding each close-miked voice in the final mix.

 

In other words, it takes that clean, noise-free, transparent and distortionless audio signal that we audiophiles have worked so hard to achieve in our systems, and adds in small, distorted copies of the original signal.

 

And that's more or less what I heard when I tried it in my headphone rig.  Each voice or instrument had its own "space" around it. Each one sounded as if it had been recorded in its own soundbooth. Terribly incoherent on headphones.

 

And that's what my ears heard when I tried it my speaker rig. So, a well-recorded solo piano normally sounds as if it emanates from a point source about 6 ft behind and between my speakers, with slight shifts between high notes and low notes, like a real piano. And each note is crystal clear, with natural attack and decay and sustain.

 

With the Qol, the piano sounds much more solid, spatially expanded to a real-sized source. And with every acoustic recording, each voice or instrument no longer sounds like a point source, each seems to have physical size and presence.

 

So for me, it is a distortion device. But when I pulled it out of the system, my wife immediately said, "What changed? Please put that back. I like it much better that way." Do I need to explain that if my wife wants to listen to my speaker system with me, I'm all for it?

 

Of course, when I want to listen alone and hear beautifully transparent and distortion-free music, I use my headphone rig.

 

wink.gif

post #8 of 19
Got a kick out of seeing MDR-F1s in the background of the photo...

And all I could think of while reading the article, and user reviews:
http://www.bbesound.com/products/sonic-maximizers/882i.aspx ("takes snippets of the signal and aligns them in and out of phase to enhance the listening experience").
post #9 of 19

Budx, have you tried it with your headphone rig?

post #10 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by customcoco View Post

Budx, have you tried it with your headphone rig?


Huh?

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by budx3385 View Post


And that's more or less what I heard when I tried it in my headphone rig.  Each voice or instrument had its own "space" around it. Each one sounded as if it had been recorded in its own soundbooth. Terribly incoherent on headphones.

 

post #11 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Smeckles View Post


Huh?

 

biggrin.gif, sorry, I have a lot of exams these days... My mind's getting dull

 

BTW: I love your avatar ;)


Edited by customcoco - 5/28/12 at 3:19am
post #12 of 19

I initially thought this was an (expensive) ADC, but their web page claims that it doesnt work that way. Nor is it EQ/DSP - its their own special creation, and  the 'Completion Stage' is just a proof-of-concept for something they want to see included in everything from mobile phones to DACs. I just cant help thinking of the Digizoid ZO - a fun distraction,  and a handy way of taming poor mixes, but a long way from the supposed audiophile mantra of 'accuracy and neutrality over euphony',  I find the individual impressions interesting, but I have to wonder how quickly the novelty wears off - I guess time will tell. In any case, I see no harm in this being offered as an optional upgrade on a DAC - being able to toggle it off and on would work for me. 

post #13 of 19

I agree with this assessment.  I love it too, but too bad, I have to let it go to the next owner now since something came up that I have no other choice :(

post #14 of 19

I just saw the portable headphone version of this and it looks interesting indeed.

Maybe start a new thread here.

Here is the video.

post #15 of 19

Sweden,

 

thanks for posting that. Hard to understand why Tyll H posted a 6min video about something that he could not give an opinion about ("very interesting"), especially since it tries to do something like the cross-fill that his Headroom amplifiers do.

 

It would be interesting also to compare to the cross-fill that the Fosgate head-amp does, or to the stereo recreation that the Smythe Realiser offers (w and w/o a Qol - haha).


Edited by budx3385 - 1/20/14 at 8:13pm
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