Head-Fi.org › Forums › Equipment Forums › Portable Headphones, Earphones and In-Ear Monitors › V-MODA M-100: Discussion/Feedback, Reviews, Pics, etc.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

V-MODA M-100: Discussion/Feedback, Reviews, Pics, etc. - Page 642

post #9616 of 21055
Quote:
Originally Posted by DigitalFreak View Post

Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)

 

 

700

 

Neither the M-80 nor the M-100 is an audiophile grade headphone....my God, whats with everyone on this thread and the word audiophile?

 

@musical-kage

 

Neither headphone you mentioned is an audiophile headphone. An audiophile headphone has absolutely no embellishment in it's sound signature and will sound as flat as possible. Throw the word audiophile out the window for now and just read on and try to understand.

 


An audiophile grade headphone is the type of headphone that's classed as a monitor grade headphone. A monitor grade headphone is basically a headphone that's tuned flat. The reason it's tuned flat is because sound engineers use it to monitor when they're mixing. If they want to eq the bass up 4 db's it's by far easier to do that and hear how it sounds on a neutral headphone then on a headphone that's overly bassy. If for example a sound engineer was mixing music on a bassy headphone that was already boosted 6 db's in the lows and added another 4 on top of that the result would be a CD with lows that sounded like mud on a stereo system. Also a flat (that's what neutral means, flat) tuned headphone is known for being generally detailed generally speaking of coarse. The reason detail is important when mixing in the studio is when the sound engineer is eqing the music to where he wants it he has to monitor the frequencies to insure those frequencies aren't tripping over one another. what i mean by tripping over one another is distortion or bleed. A flat headphone will show the sound engineer what needs to be cleaned up when he's mixing. for example if he's eqs the bass up 5 db you better believe he's going to playing close attention to the lower mids to make sure the upper bass isn't bleeding into the lower mids and blurring the lower notes in the vocals. Since we're on the subject of mids and just so everyone reading this thread knows the mids is where the music lives and breaths. Where am I going with this mid talk? Where I'm going is a neutral headphone is very very important when you're playing with the mids. Ask any audio pro out there who earns his bread and butter in the music studio and he/she will tell you it's the mids that's always the focus and the lows and highs fall into place if the mids are done right during the mixing process.

 

With that first part out of the way time to get something else out of the way. The word audiophile is a very misused word especially on these forums. An audiophile isn't a music nut or a collector of music. What an audiophile is is a type of geek, specifically he's an audio gear geek. As far as a true audiophile is concerned his sole care in the hobby is to try and find the most capable most neutral sounding gear he can get his hands on and mate it with the absolute best recorded music that's available on the market. Artists like Taylor Swift, Madonna, Iron Maiden, Depeche Mode, etc etc are considered garbage in the eyes of an audiophile. He doesn't give a crap about the top 40 or the most extreme sounding metal band or the most trippy trance song. An audiophile doesn't subscribe to any genre in particular his/her only care is finding music whatever it might be which is masterfully recorded. The idea behind it all is to play that music on the gear he/she owns and push it to it's maximum potential. The music itself is only a secondary element and the main idea is to see what can be squeezed out of the gear itself.

 

Next up, let's have a very blunt discussion about neutral. I like neutral sounding headphones. So much so I've taken steps and spent some big bones on commissioning a mod of a T50rp into a Paradox which from what I've read measures almost completely flat. For those interested who don't have the extra bones to throw around on a Paradox you might also want to look into the Mad Dogs. From what I understand they're pretty good although supposedly not on the same level of a Paradox. Here's the thing though, I can guarantee that if I was to get everyone on this thread into a room together and let him/her have a listen on a Mad Dog or a Paradox over half of the people, if not 75%, would remove those headphones and the first thing that would come out of their mouths would be how come there's no bass. A neutral headphone doesn't go doof doof doof in the bass like a bassy headphone does unless the music demands it. Guess what, those trance, hip hop, pop rock songs the mainstream bopper likes because of the doof doof bass when they were first being mixed they weren't mixed to go doof doof doof in the lows. It's the overly bassy headphones that most people bought from BestBuy that were tuned to go doof doof doof not the music.

 

With that out of the way lets now breach the topic of an analytical sounding headphone. A AKG Q701 is considered an analytical. The Sennheiser HD800 and Bayerdynamic T1 are other examples of analytical headphones. A STAX Omega II, the king of the headphone world by the way, is a neutral with a upper treble tilt that makes it boarder on analytical. The same can be said for the Somy MDR EX 600 and 1000 IEM's. This type of gear don't exaclt play well with modern recorded music due to how music has been overly eqed in the recording studio and most of the time this type of gear will sound quite harsh when playing most modern music. So why in the world would anyone want an analytical sounding headphone which can sound overly harsh, detail retrieval. An analytical is another type of coloration that a treble head (read detail fanatic) craves not unlike the basshead craves bass slam. An analytical is NOT a neutral no more then a bassy headphone is a neutral. Over the last ittle while I've noticed people on other threads describing certain gear as neutral because it's overly detailed which could not be further from the truth. A neutral will only present the detail that's present in the music while an analytical will present micro detail ( read fake detail) due to it's sound sig being overly leaned out. An analytical headphone will always have an anlaytical edge to it's sound while a well done neutral is a chameleon and can sound overly warm or overly analytical. what it sounds like depends completely on the music being played and how it was mixed in the recording studio and whether the artist went for a warmer sound to his music or a more crisper more aggressive sound.

 

(sigh) Almost finished typing...

 

To answer your question, the M 80 and M 100 are both good sound headphones and I own them both. Neither of them sound like audiophile headphones and if you want to know what I would class them as I would class them as upper tier mainstream audio gear. The M 80 is a smoother more fluid sound signature with very rolled off highs and a slight boost in the lows. Extension on both ends is decent but not great and there is a little bass bleed into the lower mids although not much. The M 100 is the more capable headphone of the two and has more detail in it's sig, better mid transition in the highs and lows more extension in the highs and lows and far more bass in the lows that doesn't bleed into the lower mids. the decision is yours which one you buy but seriously, you'll never know which headphone works for you until you try it yourself. If you're really that worried about it I say wait until the M 100 is on display on the store shelves and try it out before you buy. That's the only 100% way of knowing if it will work for you.


@ my fellow thread boppers

 

Guys, I know I'm coming across as a bit of a jerk with this post but come on. It's supposed to be about the music not the gear. Just because a headphone isn't audiophile grade doesn't mean it's a bad headphone it just means it's a colored headphone. If it's done right the coloration can sound quite nice. If it's done wrong it'll sound like garbage ( read Beats). That's why i like V-MODA's new line of headphones so much the way Val has chosen to tune the frequencies is quite tasteful and fun sounding. In the end it's all supposed to be about having fun and enjoying the music, right?

 

 

Interesting read.

 

Just for the heck of it:

Audiophile (n): a person who is especially interested in high-fidelity sound reproduction.

 

I think people use "audiophile" in this community to describe high-fidelity sound in general. The M-100 is more "fun" sounding so it's less "high fidelity" than what many people were expecting. The M-80 is much more flat overall compared to the M-100, so people are going to say it's more "audiophile" friendly. You aren't going to find "audiophile" sound in a $300 headphone, but you can certainly get a headphone that has a higher-fidelity that reproduces music "more accurately".

 

 

 

If

Quote:
An audiophile grade headphone is the type of headphone that's classed as a monitor grade headphone

then the super analytical "monitor-grade" SRH940 should be an "audiophile" headphone according to the label...or a Sony MDR-V6 "Monitor Series" Headphone, which is used in many many studios worldwide, is considered to be an "audiophile" headphone too.

 

 

 

And if nearly all the "good" headphones that people like are not "audiophile" headphones, then this whole journey is endless, pointless, and calling ourselves audiophiles is stupid...that's great news for my wallet...or not. XD


Edited by miceblue - 11/19/12 at 10:09pm
post #9617 of 21055
Quote:
Originally Posted by adman164 View Post

I was just wondering along similar lines also... How the lp/lp2 would sound when it has had the pads stuffed miceblue style, the vents on the outside covered, and if those two fail to decrease the bass enough some eq-ing?
Anyone? :S. I'd just like to know if it were possible to reduce the lp2 bass enough for it to be kind of m100 level? Was just a last minute thought before I bought the m100.
post #9618 of 21055
so musical-kage got them for £220 from v-moda how much was shipping cost (to uk) or did he include that in £220 anyone in the uk please tell me how much you paid
post #9619 of 21055
Quote:
Originally Posted by adman164 View Post


Anyone? :S. I'd just like to know if it were possible to reduce the lp2 bass enough for it to be kind of m100 level? Was just a last minute thought before I bought the m100.


You can do alot with EQ, but you can't make a square peg fit in a round hole.  While an EQ can adjust the bass, an LP2 will never sound like (read as good as) the M-100 regarding mids, highs and probably even tightness of bass.

post #9620 of 21055
Quote:
Originally Posted by musical-kage View Post

Some reviews on this thread that have been pointed out and inital reactions typed out, and Tyll's review didn't seem all that positive either.

"In this case I might not quite be able to keep my **** together. Because in this case, I'm in love. The V-Moda M-100 is the coolest, sexiest, grooviest headphone I've had the pleasure of reviewing."

 

How is that not positive?

post #9621 of 21055
Quote:
Originally Posted by Craigster75 View Post


You can do alot with EQ, but you can't make a square peg fit in a round hole.  While an EQ can adjust the bass, an LP2 will never sound like (read as good as) the M-100 regarding mids, highs and probably even tightness of bass.
Yeah good point. I think I'd rather spend more and get the best, then. Thanks
post #9622 of 21055
Quote:
Originally Posted by jonnio View Post

"In this case I might not quite be able to keep my **** together. Because in this case, I'm in love. The V-Moda M-100 is the coolest, sexiest, grooviest headphone I've had the pleasure of reviewing."

 

How is that not positive?


Well it's not negative per se, but:

Quote:
Audiophiles looking for faithful reproduction should look elsewhere for a full-sized sealed headphone (e.g., Sennheiser Momentum, Logitech UE6000), the M-100 simply are not transparent enough.
...
In fact, they'll be my go-to headphones against which all basshead wanna-bes will be compared, and as such are going on the "Wall of Fame" as the best basshead headphone.

might be a huge detraction for many who were expecting a more audiophile-friendly M-80.

 

 

......and there we go with the "audiophiles" again.

post #9623 of 21055
Quote:
Originally Posted by DigitalFreak View Post

 

700

 

Neither the M-80 nor the M-100 is an audiophile grade headphone....my God, whats with everyone on this thread and the word audiophile?

 

@musical-kage

 

Neither headphone you mentioned is an audiophile headphone. An audiophile headphone has absolutely no embellishment in it's sound signature and will sound as flat as possible. Throw the word audiophile out the window for now and just read on and try to understand.

 


 

To answer your question, the M 80 and M 100 are both good sound headphones and I own them both. Neither of them sound like audiophile headphones and if you want to know what I would class them as I would class them as upper tier mainstream audio gear. The M 80 is a smoother more fluid sound signature with very rolled off highs and a slight boost in the lows. Extension on both ends is decent but not great and there is a little bass bleed into the lower mids although not much. The M 100 is the more capable headphone of the two and has more detail in it's sig, better mid transition in the highs and lows more extension in the highs and lows and far more bass in the lows that doesn't bleed into the lower mids. the decision is yours which one you buy but seriously, you'll never know which headphone works for you until you try it yourself. If you're really that worried about it I say wait until the M 100 is on display on the store shelves and try it out before you buy. That's the only 100% way of knowing if it will work for you.


@ my fellow thread boppers

 

Guys, I know I'm coming across as a bit of a jerk with this post but come on. It's supposed to be about the music not the gear. Just because a headphone isn't audiophile grade doesn't mean it's a bad headphone it just means it's a colored headphone. If it's done right the coloration can sound quite nice. If it's done wrong it'll sound like garbage ( read Beats). That's why i like V-MODA's new line of headphones so much the way Val has chosen to tune the frequencies is quite tasteful and fun sounding. In the end it's all supposed to be about having fun and enjoying the music, right?

 

By audiophile grade, I personally mean a headphone that shows off detail, and is the best it can be, producing extra stuff a cheaper headphone will not be able to do.

By audiophile, I do not mean a flat response.

A flat response to me would be boring. I do require some fun element in a headphone I think, but with my limited knowledge, I couldn't really tell you, but from the 3 headphones I have had, I can say, I do prefer some extra bass element, BUT I also require a headphone that can sound good on all levels.

 

I class myself as an audiophile because unlike all my friends, I do care about sound equipment and do put into consideration stuff like this.

I class myself as an audiophile also because my friends wouldn't be hunting for months on end to get new headphones, unlike myself.

 

I guess we all class ourselves differerently, but that is what I mean by it.

 

I think it will be interesting to see what I think of them, based off my limited knowledge, and a review I may write, I can write 100% from a untoned view, because I haven't listened to anything top of the range.

 

But I wanted a headphone that would be classed as a very good headphone for all types of music that I would enjoy listening to, with a fun aspect, which is what drew me to V-Moda in the first place. But I wanted one A LOT more detailed than the ones I had, and were worth the price.

Ones I can wear publically and wear around the shoulders when not in use, and ones that didn't need amping.

I don't really listen to the top 40's. Most of the artists I can list, 80% of people my age wouldn't even know.

 

So, thanks for the post, but I hope you get what I mean now, or at least, what I think I mean.

 

M-100 price:

 

The M-100 price did include delivery yes, with the 10 day option (the $20 one)

Turns out, with the 1.53 charge from UK to US, its costing me £233.67.

 

That said, that also includes an audio only cable as I'm not interested one bit in the ones with the buttons. I couldn't care less to be honest.

post #9624 of 21055
Quote:
Originally Posted by miceblue View Post


Well it's not negative per se, but:

might be a huge detraction for many who were expecting a more audiophile-friendly M-80.

 

 

......and there we go with the "audiophiles" again.


But then, this leads us to look at reviews, and reports on the UE6000, etc and I've read that the headphones produce muddier sound than the M-100's.

 

You simply cannot trust reviews, I agree, until you have really listened to them yourself. One reason why I'm on the fence to writing one, unless I state at the start "with my ears, and experiences"

 

"In fact, they'll be my go-to headphones against which all basshead wanna-bes will be compared, and as such are going on the "Wall of Fame" as the best basshead headphone."

 

Basshead... That is what puts me off them slightly. Like I said, I don't class myself as a basshead, but he has listened to A LOT of different headphones. I haven't.

I could listen to them and love them based on my experiences, and may not class them as basshead at all.

From inital reviews, they were classed as anything but basshead, with tight, punchy, detailed lows, with great mids and detailed highs.

 

Basshead to me, signifies a headphone that only cares about bass, and that is something I believe the M-100 doesn't do.


Edited by musical-kage - 11/20/12 at 10:36am
post #9625 of 21055
Quote:
Originally Posted by miceblue View Post


Well it's not negative per se, but:

might be a huge detraction for many who were expecting a more audiophile-friendly M-80.

 

 

......and there we go with the "audiophiles" again.

 

Identifying ideal sound is like identifying the world's most beautiful woman- there will never be agreement because it is all so subjective.  We throw around words like transparent, neutral, audiophile, fun, colored, warm, bright, etc.  Any of these terms can be positive or negative depending on the listener's preference.  I take a very unscientific approach to this hobby.  I put the headphones on my head or in my ears, press play on a playlist of my favorite music and close my eyes.  I found DigitalFreak's post thought provoking and informative.  As I am not a recording engineer or working DJ and only listen for recreation and personal enjoyment, I prefer a colored headphone with accentuation in all the right places.  Tying in my opening analogy, I consider the M-100 to be the Sophia Vergara of headphones.


Edited by Craigster75 - 11/20/12 at 10:40am
post #9626 of 21055
Quote:
Originally Posted by musical-kage View Post


But then, this leads us to look at reviews, and reports on the UE6000, etc and I've read that the headphones produce muddier sound than the M-100's.

 

You simply cannot trust reviews, I agree, until you have really listened to them yourself. One reason why I'm on the fence to writing one, unless I state at the start "with my ears, and experiences"

 

"In fact, they'll be my go-to headphones against which all basshead wanna-bes will be compared, and as such are going on the "Wall of Fame" as the best basshead headphone."

 

Basshead... That is what puts me off them slightly. Like I said, I don't class myself as a basshead, but he has listened to A LOT of different headphones. I haven't.

I could listen to them and love them based on my experiences, and may not class them as basshead at all.

From inital reviews, they were classed as anything but basshead, with tight, punchy, detailed lows, with great mids and detailed highs.

 

Basshead to me, signifies a headphone that only cares about bass, and that is something I believe the M-100 doesn't do.

I agree to a certain extent. Most basshead headphones have a V-shaped sound signature, and the M-100 happens to have an inverted J-shaped signature. XD

Bass lower-midrange upper-midrange lower-treble upper-treble

 

The slightly accentuated upper-mids make the M-100 pretty decent for female vocals, or upper-frequency string instruments. Were it not for the super-boosted bass response, the M-100 would probably be really good for instrumental tracks.

 

Though it's not to the same degree as the in-your-face upper mids SRH940, the M-100 still gives me ASMR chills at 2:20 in this song. :p

 

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Craigster75 View Post

 

Identifying ideal sound is like identifying the world's most beautiful woman- there will never be agreement because it is all so subjective.  We throw around words like transparent, neutral, audiophile, fun, colored, warm, bright, etc.  Any of these terms can be positive or negative depending on the listener's preference.  I take a very unscientific approach to this hobby.  I put the headphones on my head or in my ears, press play on a playlist of my favorite music and close my eyes.  I found DigitalFreak's post thought provoking and informative.  As I am not a recording engineer or working DJ and only listen for recreation and personal enjoyment, I prefer a colored headphone with accentuation in all the right places.  Tying in my opening analogy, I consider the M-100 to be the Sophia Vergara of headphones.


Mhmm this is true. But that's why this and this exist to help standardize/correct the use of such words.

post #9627 of 21055
Quote:

Mhmm this is true. But that's why this and this exist to help standardize/correct the use of such words.


@miceblue- I am going to pay you a compliment- you are a skilled researcher who goes above and beyond to support your position, nicely done!  If you are still deciding your career path, I think you would excel as a lawyer.

post #9628 of 21055
Quote:
Originally Posted by Craigster75 View Post

 

Identifying ideal sound is like identifying the world's most beautiful woman- there will never be agreement because it is all so subjective.  We throw around words like transparent, neutral, audiophile, fun, colored, warm, bright, etc.  Any of these terms can be positive or negative depending on the listener's preference.  I take a very unscientific approach to this hobby.  I put the headphones on my head or in my ears, press play on a playlist of my favorite music and close my eyes.  I found DigitalFreak's post thought provoking and informative.  As I am not a recording engineer or working DJ and only listen for recreation and personal enjoyment, I prefer a colored headphone with accentuation in all the right places.  Tying in my opening analogy, I consider the M-100 to be the Sophia Vergara of headphones.


The other part that I kind of disagree with is that "audiophiles" strive for reproducing the original sound the most faithfully they can, but only in as far as every piece of equipment and the source is totally neutral.  To me, the end goal of faithful reproduction means there are two ways to skin a cat:

1) only buy neutral (flat frequency response) gear and constrain yourself to the limited # of recordings which are also perfectly transparent.

2) buy gear that matches the music you like and how it's mastered in order to produce the most faithful end-user experience.  That means if you know your music is mixed with an ear towards consumer audio gear, then you can get high end gear that compensates for that to re-produce a faithful experience.  In other words, a recording that sounds like crap on a frequency neutral set doesn't necessarily need to be looked down upon as poor, it's just tailored for a different audience, and the right equipment can still yield what I would consider an audiophile experience.  Even if each individual piece isn't "audiophile" per say.  I think the M-100s are geared to give a pleasing (I won't use the word audiophile) experience with today's music and the way that it's mastered.


Edited by jonnio - 11/20/12 at 1:05pm
post #9629 of 21055
Quote:
Originally Posted by miceblue View Post

I agree to a certain extent. Most basshead headphones have a V-shaped sound signature, and the M-100 happens to have an inverted J-shaped signature. XD

Bass lower-midrange upper-midrange lower-treble upper-treble

 

The slightly accentuated upper-mids make the M-100 pretty decent for female vocals, or upper-frequency string instruments. Were it not for the super-boosted bass response, the M-100 would probably be really good for instrumental tracks.

 

Though it's not to the same degree as the in-your-face upper mids SRH940, the M-100 still gives me ASMR chills at 2:20 in this song. :p

 

 

 


Mhmm this is true. But that's why this and this exist to help standardize/correct the use of such words.

 

Love that track!!! :D

 

You've got me to like her music, and I'm trying to purchase the album. I won't download MP3 though (I'd prefer to buy the CD and rip it myself in that case), so I want it FLAC, but no where is offering it in FLAC form from what I can see, except for illiegal downloads, and I'm not going that route!

Not on Spotify, and Amazon.co.uk lists the new album as an import at 30 odd quid!!!

 

I do really find it distracting how much she dances though, and in the way she does!

 

I guess audio equipment is very subjective (if that is the right word). It is only good unless you've heard something better, unless it offers something different.

The V-Moda line of headphones I believe offer something different, that maybe if your keen on high end gear, that offer a flatter response, the M-100's may offer you a great experience.

I haven't had much experience in either, so my experience is going to come more from what I feel. Not what I expect to hear based on other headphones.

 

So, with that said, you will have to wait for my possible video (not review) but experiences of it when they arrive.


Edited by musical-kage - 11/20/12 at 12:33pm
post #9630 of 21055

As much as I loved the M-100's for modern music and anything with a bass line, I am really more looking forward to what val has planned next, specifically the Revolver and his next headphone. (can't remember the codename)

 

The only things he'd need to do is...

  • Work on making it more comfortable for more people. (Rotating cups, thicker pads, what have you)
  • Beefing up the construction so it not only feels strong, but looks strong.
  • Changing up the look slightly, sleeker lines anyone?
  • Making a truly versatile (sound-wise) headphone. I couldn't stand Classical and more detailed music on my M-100's, sounded too congested to me. (From memory)

 

But whatever. That's all talk for the next 700-page V-MODA thread. wink_face.gif

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
Head-Fi.org › Forums › Equipment Forums › Portable Headphones, Earphones and In-Ear Monitors › V-MODA M-100: Discussion/Feedback, Reviews, Pics, etc.