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post #6631 of 21041
Quote:
Originally Posted by snarkie View Post

In a somewhat related to the topic question, can anyone recommend me an amp to pair with these headphones and my iphone4/ipod classic. Until recently, I wasn't aware that amps existed and am now interested in finding one to improve sound quality when I finally get my hands on the headphones. I know a lot of people like the VAMP, but that's a little too rich for my blood. Thanks!


FiiO E11 for portable use; FiiO E17 if you want PC hookup and portable- IMO, best bang for the buck.  I have the E11 and love the sound as well as bass boost.

post #6632 of 21041
Quote:
Originally Posted by Craigster75 View Post


FiiO E11 for portable use; FiiO E17 if you want PC hookup and portable- IMO, best bang for the buck.  I have the E11 and love the sound as well as bass boost.


Agreed. My E17 does very well desktop and portable.

post #6633 of 21041
Quote:
Originally Posted by Craigster75 View Post


FiiO E11 for portable use; FiiO E17 if you want PC hookup and portable- IMO, best bang for the buck.  I have the E11 and love the sound as well as bass boost.

Or the E7 if the E17 is out of his budget.
The E7 is also a good bang for your buck. Oddly enough, the E17 uses the same Wolfson WM8740 DAC as the E7, but sounds better somehow. I'll probably upgrade to the E17 at a later time.

  • Line out dock (LOD) to mini-jack/plug DAC/amps only bypass an iDevice's audio DAC (FiiO E17 for example). The external DAC/amp only acts as an amplifier at this point. These types of DAC/amps are generally priced at < $250
  • LOD to USB DAC/amps bypass both an iDevices audio DAC and amp (Fostex HP-P1 for example). The external DAC/amp then does all of the audio processing. These types of DAC/amps are generally priced at the $500 point.
^ correct me if I'm wrong; I just found out about the E7 only acting as an amp yesterday. >.>


Speaking of the VAMP though: Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)

^ this was Tweeted by Val


And of course, some music to chill to:

^ I can't wait to hear this song in CD quality; classical crossover FTW
Edited by miceblue - 9/23/12 at 7:55pm
post #6634 of 21041
Quote:
Originally Posted by miceblue View Post


Or the E7 if the E17 is out of his budget.
The E7 is also a good bang for your buck. Oddly enough, the E17 uses the same Wolfson WM8740 DAC as the E7, but sounds better somehow. I'll probably upgrade to the E17 at a later time.
  • Line out dock (LOD) to mini-jack/plug DAC/amps only bypass an iDevice's audio DAC (FiiO E17 for example). The external DAC/amp only acts as an amplifier at this point. These types of DAC/amps are generally priced at < $250
  • LOD to USB DAC/amps bypass both an iDevices audio DAC and amp (Fostex HP-P1 for example). The external DAC/amp then does all of the audio processing. These types of DAC/amps are generally priced at the $500 point.
^ correct me if I'm wrong; I just found out about the E7 only acting as an amp yesterday. >.>
 

I'm gonna guess that the E17 has a better USB controller chip, apparently that was the main limiting factor of the E7 (and why the E7 only supports 16/42khz playback whereas the E17 is higher-res with 24-bit).  Also the amp section was probably upgraded significantly too so I guess that's something as well.

post #6635 of 21041

I was checking out Innerfidelity a while ago, and wow, I got quite surprised. For those who are willing to change their phones for any reason, and can afford it, it's a really seductive option. Specially for the SQ I've been reading about it.

 

Here is the article: http://www.innerfidelity.com/content/sound-smartphone-meizu-mx-4-core

 

I'm personally tempted to buy one, however no longer I can afford one of those right now frown.gif

My cell phone is such a piece of garbage Huawei from last year, it was sent from hell to make my life the same...angry_face.gif

Anyways. I was thinking to save up money to buy, maybe a dedicated player + amp or some sort of deal, but now I'm kinda made my mind to save for a quite longer and hit two problems with only one rock.

 

Has anyone had an experience with this phone already? Or maybe any extra advise?

tongue_smile.gif If anyone has one of those, does't like it, and is willing to donate it... I know I'm dreaming too high tongue_smile.gif

post #6636 of 21041
Quote:
Originally Posted by miceblue View Post


And of course, some music to chill to:
^ I can't wait to hear this song in CD quality; classical crossover FTW

 

 

Call me insane, or a hater, or whatever, but I really don't particularly care for her.

 

Don't get me wrong, I have her debut album that came out last week, and I had been following her before that with her singles and such, but I just can't get into her. She's obviously very passionate about her violin and her music, but...

 

I dunno, I feel like she composes very samey-soundy violin pieces and then whoever produces the electronic portion just throws some very generic, very 'in' drum loops, synth waves, etc. I dunno. Just doesn't appeal to me.

 

Guess it's better than hearing Gangnam Style for the billionth time, though.


Edited by Leon Dota - 9/23/12 at 11:21pm
post #6637 of 21041
Quote:
Originally Posted by Leon Dota View Post

 

Call me insane, or a hater, or whatever, but I really don't particularly care for her.

 

Don't get me wrong, I have her debut album that came out last week, and I had been following her before that with her singles and such, but I just can't get into her. She's obviously very passionate about her violin and her music, but...

 

I dunno, I feel like she composes very samey-soundy violin pieces and then whoever produces the electronic portion just throws some very generic, very 'in' drum loops, synth waves, etc. I dunno. Just doesn't appeal to me.

 

Guess it's better than hearing Gangnam Style for the billionth time, though.

 

Yeah I agree with you on the underlined portion. I think she's appealing to me because electronic + violin has been pretty rare, I think, in the past. She's the first artist I've heard who combines the two, so maybe I'm just over-enthusiastic about her music.

Does this count as a similar style? XD (Click to show)

 

Only after hearing Lindsey did I find out about Vanessa Mae, who is more of a traditional crossover artist:

Some of my favourite tracks (Click to show)

 

 

 

 

And yes, Lindsey did the same song, but more modern-sounding:

 

 

To me, pretty much anything is better than Gangnam Style. That song is depressing...the dude/song is freaking EVERYWHERE in the media. T_T

 

 

But yeah, I have a lot of test tracks to listen to with the M-100. I've been making a playlist with a bunch of music genres.


Edited by miceblue - 9/24/12 at 12:07am
post #6638 of 21041
Quote:
Originally Posted by snarkie View Post

In a somewhat related to the topic question, can anyone recommend me an amp to pair with these headphones and my iphone4/ipod classic. Until recently, I wasn't aware that amps existed and am now interested in finding one to improve sound quality when I finally get my hands on the headphones. I know a lot of people like the VAMP, but that's a little too rich for my blood. Thanks!

  

  I know I'm going to wait for the VERZA, before I spend any money on an amp/DAC,  to see what that's all about.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Leon Dota View Post

 

 

Call me insane, or a hater, or whatever, but I really don't particularly care for her.

 

Don't get me wrong, I have her debut album that came out last week, and I had been following her before that with her singles and such, but I just can't get into her. She's obviously very passionate about her violin and her music, but...

 

I dunno, I feel like she composes very samey-soundy violin pieces and then whoever produces the electronic portion just throws some very generic, very 'in' drum loops, synth waves, etc. I dunno. Just doesn't appeal to me.

 

Guess it's better than hearing Gangnam Style for the billionth time, though.

 

 I know what you're saying.

 

Bonfire Madigan. <--She's the Queen.

post #6639 of 21041
Quote:
Originally Posted by miceblue View Post

Speaking of the VAMP though:And of course, some music to chill to . . . D quality; classical crossover FTW

I wanted to like that piece on principle for the reason you mentioned below.  It's also against my religion to discourage your enthusiasm for Lindsey Stirling, but if she wants to do dance floor moves that are not sui generic, I wish she'd collaborate with DJ Hidden, Enduser or even Bob Rifo (who's so hellbent on pretending to be a beat-mapped noise guitarist that people forget he's trained as a classical musician).

 

Unfortunately, the track she's playing to could have been recorded in the '80s and whoever is calling it dubstep should be relieved of their command.  That's a generic three-chord pad that could have come from any hoary Paul van Dyk or even Trevor Horn production and the drums are a straight two and four from the days when syncopation was illegal -- it doesn't matter that there's an eighth note triplet on the fourth quarter note of every fourth bar.  That has nothing to do with dubstep, nor do the rhythms she's playing over the track.

 

Not that I've been paying attention to dubstep since 2009, but it would be nice if she'd actually collaborate with someone like Distance or Clubroot or even that Chavian master of kitsch, Caspa, with his resonance-filter-happy basslines that all sound like a baritone stutterer trying to pronounce the word what. Working with any of those people would take her out of her comfort zone and change her approach to soloing.

 

I tend to call classical/electronic tracks hybrids when they're successful.  I don't expect anyone else to adopt the term, but it helps to explain the higher level of integration between the two styles which I find most interesting.

 

Older attempts at what I call hybrid include Murcof's albums (esp. Martes and Mexico), practically anything by Akira Rabelais, utp_ by Sakamoto and Alva Noto (with full orchestration for strings), 1-bit symphony by Tristan Perrich (especially if you buy the album in the format of a mini-synth shaped like a CD), Timber by Michael Gordon (acoustic percussion mimicking dub techno whether they know it or not), etc.  Anyone remember Ki-Oku, the album DJ Krush recorded with trumpeter Toshinori Kondo?  Very, very old, but at least it pushed the boundaries of the instrumentalist.  You might also listen to Eleventh Hour, the Arditti String Quartet's performances of compositions by Fred Frith.  We had to interview Frith last week and that gentleman knows how to orchestrate.  Someone else who knows what he's doing:  Matthew Herbert, who's trained as an arranger in addition to being an excellent engineer, house producer and DJ.

 

Two examples of hybrids that didn't work:  Someone else's generic orchestrations of IDM tracks by Aphex Twin, and The Bells, a fully symphonic album of classics by Jeff Mills, who's on deck throughout -- orchestrated by a hack who unfortunately didn't understand Mills' style at all. 


Edited by scrypt - 9/24/12 at 12:57am
post #6640 of 21041
Quote:
Originally Posted by olpne View Post

Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)

 

  

  I know I'm going to wait for the VERZA, before I spend any money on an amp/DAC,  to see what that's all about.

 

 I know what you're saying.

 

 

 

Bonfire Madigan. <--She's the Queen.

Woah wait hold on, she (Madigan Shive) is from Seattle, Washington and I haven't heard of her? eek.gif

Now I need to check the local music stores for her albums...

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by scrypt View Post

I wanted to like that piece on principle for the reason you mentioned below (I tend to call classical/electronic pieces hybrids when they're successful).  It's also against my religion to discourage your enthusiasm for Lindsay Stirling, but if she wants to do dance floor moves that are not sui generis, I wish she'd collaborate with DJ Hidden, Enduser or even Bob Rifo (who's so hellbent on pretending to be a beat-mapped noise guitarist that people forget he's trained as a classical musician).

 

Unfortunately, the track she's playing to could have been recorded in the '80s and whoever is calling it dubstep should be relieved of their command.  That's a generic three-chord pad that could have come from any pop song and the drums are a straight two and four from the days when syncopation was illegal -- it doesn't matter that there's an eighth note triplet on the fourth quarter note of every fourth bar.  That has nothing to do with dubstep, nor do the rhythms she's playing.

 

Not that I've been paying attention to dubstep since 2009, but it would be nice if she'd actually collaborate with someone like Distance or Clubroot or even that Chavian master of kitsch, Caspa, with his resonance-filter-happy basslines that all sound like a baritone stutterer trying to pronounce the word what. Working with any of those people would take her out of her comfort zone and change her approach to soloing.

 

Older attempts at what I call hybrid include Murcof's albums (esp. Martes and Mexico), practically anything by Akira Rabelais, utp_ by Sakamoto and Alva Noto (with full orchestration for strings), 1-bit symphony by Tristan Perrich (especially if you buy the album in the format of a mini-synth shaped like a CD), Timber by Michael Gordon (acoustic percussion mimicking dub techno whether they know it or not), etc.  Anyone remember Ki-Oku, the album DJ Krush recorded with trumpeter Toshinori Kondo?  Very, very old, but at least it pushed the boundaries of the instrumentalist.  

Yeah I wouldn't really call it a true dubstep song. I think people associate dubstep with the "wub wub wub" sounds.

 

Interesting, I'll have to look into those artists too.

 

 

Strangely enough, all of this "musical exploration" has recently really got me excited for the M-100.

Classical crossover is to "breaking the boundaries" between either modern and classical music as the M-100 is to "breaking the boundaries" between either the modern music listener or the audiophile.

^ just me thinking out loud again. XD


Edited by miceblue - 9/24/12 at 12:58am
post #6641 of 21041
Quote:
Originally Posted by scrypt View Post

I wanted to like that piece on principle for the reason you mentioned below.  It's also against my religion to discourage your enthusiasm for Lindsey Stirling, but if she wants to do dance floor moves that are not sui generic, I wish she'd collaborate with DJ Hidden, Enduser or even Bob Rifo (who's so hellbent on pretending to be a beat-mapped noise guitarist that people forget he's trained as a classical musician).

 

Unfortunately, the track she's playing to could have been recorded in the '80s and whoever is calling it dubstep should be relieved of their command.  That's a generic three-chord pad that could have come from any hoary Paul van Dyk or even Trevor Horn production and the drums are a straight two and four from the days when syncopation was illegal -- it doesn't matter that there's an eighth note triplet on the fourth quarter note of every fourth bar.  That has nothing to do with dubstep, nor do the rhythms she's playing over the track.

 

Not that I've been paying attention to dubstep since 2009, but it would be nice if she'd actually collaborate with someone like Distance or Clubroot or even that Chavian master of kitsch, Caspa, with his resonance-filter-happy basslines that all sound like a baritone stutterer trying to pronounce the word what. Working with any of those people would take her out of her comfort zone and change her approach to soloing.

 

I tend to call classical/electronic tracks hybrids when they're successful.  I don't expect anyone else to adopt the term, but it helps to explain the higher level of integration between the two styles which I find most interesting.

 

Older attempts at what I call hybrid include Murcof's albums (esp. Martes and Mexico), practically anything by Akira Rabelais, utp_ by Sakamoto and Alva Noto (with full orchestration for strings), 1-bit symphony by Tristan Perrich (especially if you buy the album in the format of a mini-synth shaped like a CD), Timber by Michael Gordon (acoustic percussion mimicking dub techno whether they know it or not), etc.  Anyone remember Ki-Oku, the album DJ Krush recorded with trumpeter Toshinori Kondo?  Very, very old, but at least it pushed the boundaries of the instrumentalist.  You might also listen to Eleventh Hour, the Arditti String Quartet's performances of compositions by Fred Frith.  We had to interview Frith last week and that gentleman knows how to orchestrate.  Someone else who knows what he's doing:  Matthew Herbert, who's trained as an arranger in addition to being an excellent engineer, house producer and DJ.

 

Two examples of hybrids that didn't work:  Someone else's generic orchestrations of IDM tracks by Aphex Twin, and The Bells, a fully symphonic album of classics by Jeff Mills, who's on deck throughout -- orchestrated by a hack who unfortunately didn't understand Mills' style at all. 

I like this one, speaking of hybrids:

 

post #6642 of 21041
Quote:
Originally Posted by miceblue View Post

Yeah I wouldn't really call it a true dubstep song. I think people associate dubstep with the "wub wub wub" sounds.

 

Strangely enough, all of this "musical exploration" has recently really got me excited for the M-100.

Classical crossover is to "breaking the boundaries" between either modern and classical music as the M-100 is to "breaking the boundaries" between either the modern music listener or the audiophile.

^ just me thinking out loud again. XD

 

Caspa is definitely of the wub-wub-wub school.  Every song sounds like Scooby-Doo trying to explain that his bone is made of rubber (showing my age with that last reference, h-m-m-m?).

 

Certain dubstep artists can be a lot more challenging than that, however; it would be interesting to hear more trained violinists actually explore that style.  As long as L.S. keeps riffing over generic tracks, she can continue resorting to sixteenth-note diatonic scales and arpeggios of triads while Rome burns in the background (signifying the would-be hotness of her solos).  I'd like to hear her do more than that -- she sounds as if she could.

 

If Val notices that last paragraph of yours, he might be inspired by it.  He appears to think like you do. Sadly, he seems a bit busy for free association at the mome.


Edited by scrypt - 9/24/12 at 1:11am
post #6643 of 21041
Quote:
Originally Posted by scrypt View Post

I wanted to like that piece on principle for the reason you mentioned below.  It's also against my religion to discourage your enthusiasm for Lindsey Stirling, but if she wants to do dance floor moves that are not sui generic, I wish she'd collaborate with DJ Hidden, Enduser or even Bob Rifo (who's so hellbent on pretending to be a beat-mapped noise guitarist that people forget he's trained as a classical musician).

 

Unfortunately, the track she's playing to could have been recorded in the '80s and whoever is calling it dubstep should be relieved of their command.  That's a generic three-chord pad that could have come from any hoary Paul van Dyk or even Trevor Horn production and the drums are a straight two and four from the days when syncopation was illegal -- it doesn't matter that there's an eighth note triplet on the fourth quarter note of every fourth bar.  That has nothing to do with dubstep, nor do the rhythms she's playing over the track.

 

Not that I've been paying attention to dubstep since 2009, but it would be nice if she'd actually collaborate with someone like Distance or Clubroot or even that Chavian master of kitsch, Caspa, with his resonance-filter-happy basslines that all sound like a baritone stutterer trying to pronounce the word what. Working with any of those people would take her out of her comfort zone and change her approach to soloing.

 

I tend to call classical/electronic tracks hybrids when they're successful.  I don't expect anyone else to adopt the term, but it helps to explain the higher level of integration between the two styles which I find most interesting.

 

Older attempts at what I call hybrid include Murcof's albums (esp. Martes and Mexico), practically anything by Akira Rabelais, utp_ by Sakamoto and Alva Noto (with full orchestration for strings), 1-bit symphony by Tristan Perrich (especially if you buy the album in the format of a mini-synth shaped like a CD), Timber by Michael Gordon (acoustic percussion mimicking dub techno whether they know it or not), etc.  Anyone remember Ki-Oku, the album DJ Krush recorded with trumpeter Toshinori Kondo?  Very, very old, but at least it pushed the boundaries of the instrumentalist.  You might also listen to Eleventh Hour, the Arditti String Quartet's performances of compositions by Fred Frith.  We had to interview Frith last week and that gentleman knows how to orchestrate.  Someone else who knows what he's doing:  Matthew Herbert, who's trained as an arranger in addition to being an excellent engineer, house producer and DJ.

 

Two examples of hybrids that didn't work:  Someone else's generic orchestrations of IDM tracks by Aphex Twin, and The Bells, a fully symphonic album of classics by Jeff Mills, who's on deck throughout -- orchestrated by a hack who unfortunately didn't understand Mills' style at all. 

 

Hot damn, Scrypt, you pretty much captured everything I really wanted to say (and couldn't because I'm just not the best writer), and weaved it in this...beautiful collection of paragraphs. You are a pretty astounding guy.

post #6644 of 21041

Someone mentioned the Meizu MX-4 Core, how does the DAC in it stack against the one in the Galaxy S3 and the other way around? 

Is it worth going for the Meizu just because of the sound?

post #6645 of 21041
Quote:

Originally Posted by DaBomb77766  I like this one, speaking of hybrids:

 

 

 

AVB is a competent trance producer.  That piece based on a cycle of fifths, which most people associate with baroque music and the early classical period (Mozart and Cherubini), as they do the vibrato and high notes sung by the vocalist.  Trance tends to minimize dissonance, and I expect AVB would use Lindsey Stirling's harmonic sense very well (though he'd never let her overplay on any track).

 

A famous minimalist composer who plays with baroque and classical styles: Michael Nyman.

 

Something I miss in trance is a more sophisticated harmonic approach. Trance is often very triadic, which can be great, but I'm a fan of the pandiatonic harmonies used in modernist music and sometimes in IDM.


Edited by scrypt - 9/24/12 at 5:03pm
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