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V-MODA M-100: Discussion/Feedback, Reviews, Pics, etc. - Page 1265

post #18961 of 22867
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tom22 View Post

i think it was stated a few (maybe 30 pages back now haha) the faders decrease the sound quality some m100 users tried to use them on airplanes and it just doesn't work. my question is why do you want to listen so loud? an then have the faders dampen it? why not just turn it down?

i don't have the m100s but even with my monoprice 8323 i don't listen to above 50% on my iphone (which is loud for me anyway) and its like 40ohms with sensitivity 100 +/- 3 dB / 1mW (S.P. L at 1 k Hz)

to each their own but as a fellow head fi i would want to preserve your hearing for many years of audio nirvana ahead

Yes I agree that's why I would like to know what the loudest safe level is. I don't always listen to my music real loud, but for some songs I want to crank it up. I've just never tried the faders so I don't know what they do. On their description, to me it sounds like they only reduce the dangerous sounds. If they only make things less loud then yes there would be no point to me.
post #18962 of 22867
Quote:
Originally Posted by zeppu08 View Post

Hmmm anyone tried the furutech cables? Is there really a change on on the SQ? Thinking to get one.. Any thoughts please?

 

I think $65 for a cable is a waste.

post #18963 of 22867
Quote:
Originally Posted by miceblue View Post

You should have read the app description. XD

https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/decibel-10th/id448155923?mt=8

Well no duh. The dial on the app only goes to 100. That is like saying I need to read the explanation of a light switch to find out it doesn't have a dimmer. I can at it and see.
I said my readings maxed out at 90. Would 90 cause physical pain to my ears instantly ?
post #18964 of 22867
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zorrofox View Post

You guys comparing how loud you can listen/tolerate seem to be missing something out. Do you all have the same hearing sensitivity to start with? Maybe some of you are deaf to start with (and others of you certainly will be before too long).

Don't take it personally - just some friendly input from a 50 year old who knows his hearing is far from optimum. I blame bass bins 😁

That is is not at all why I started my query here.
Loud music sounds great sometimes. Now that I have cans that can drive loud music clearly, I am concerned at how loud and how long I can listen. I WANT to protect my ears, but I also want to enjoy some loud tracks from time to time.
post #18965 of 22867
Quote:
Originally Posted by gr34td3str0y3r View Post


That is is not at all why I started my query here.
Loud music sounds great sometimes. Now that I have cans that can drive loud music clearly, I am concerned at how loud and how long I can listen. I WANT to protect my ears, but I also want to enjoy some loud tracks from time to time.

 

TBH you'll know if you're causing damage. I've done it at metal concerts and you KNOW it's happening. Your ears don't accidentally get hurt, and unless you completely blast your cilia down you WILL heal if you overdo it a little (just don't do it again!). If your ears feel tired or hurt in any fashion, crank it down a little. General rule: start with the volume lower than you'd normally like it and nudge it upward. Since getting the M100's I've pulled the volume down a bit when listening to music and it's been fantastic, and I listen to a LOT of death/black/grind/post metal. 

 

In fact, the cleanness of the M100s makes it easier to listen to them at lower volumes because you're not trying to shove the volume upward to get the full force of the music out like you would with cheaper headphones. Volume at around 66% seems to work great on all my devices lately. 

post #18966 of 22867
Quote:
Originally Posted by SomeGuyDude View Post

TBH you'll know if you're causing damage. I've done it at metal concerts and you KNOW it's happening. Your ears don't accidentally get hurt, and unless you completely blast your cilia down you WILL heal if you overdo it a little (just don't do it again!). If your ears feel tired or hurt in any fashion, crank it down a little. General rule: start with the volume lower than you'd normally like it and nudge it upward. Since getting the M100's I've pulled the volume down a bit when listening to music and it's been fantastic, and I listen to a LOT of death/black/grind/post metal. 

In fact, the cleanness of the M100s makes it easier to listen to them at lower volumes because you're not trying to shove the volume upward to get the full force of the music out like you would with cheaper headphones. Volume at around 66% seems to work great on all my devices lately. 

Don't take this the wrong way, but it's not that simple.
If I put my iPhone volume at 90% at the start it's too loud. I have found my self starting at 50% and slowly turning it up song after song. Then I'm at 90%, it's loud but it's okay. Sounds "okay" to my ears. I am sure OSHA would say that at 30 minutes or 5 hours, I have no idea, that those level would cause damage.
Damage be caused at moderate levels for short periods of time. A gun shot next to your ear of course is going to hurt. A concert will hurt very quickly maybe 2 minutes.
But damage doesn't have to be hurting to be happening.
post #18967 of 22867
Quote:
Originally Posted by gr34td3str0y3r View Post


Don't take this the wrong way, but it's not that simple.
If I put my iPhone volume at 90% at the start it's too loud. I have found my self starting at 50% and slowly turning it up song after song. Then I'm at 90%, it's loud but it's okay. Sounds "okay" to my ears. I am sure OSHA would say that at 30 minutes or 5 hours, I have no idea, that those level would cause damage.
Damage be caused at moderate levels for short periods of time. A gun shot next to your ear of course is going to hurt. A concert will hurt very quickly maybe 2 minutes.
But damage doesn't have to be hurting to be happening.

 

See I would disagree here. When you start at high volume, that's your baseline. Start low and nudge upward and you'll be able to listen at a lower level because you're not "expecting" that same amount of impact from the sound. It's how I do it constantly. Start the volume at 50% and poke higher and higher until I can enjoy it. If I start way high, lowering the volume feels like "ugh I'm losing music".

 

I've been a loud music guy for decades, and I've hurt myself doing it. However, I do well on hearing tests still (so I'm skeptical about claims that if you damage your ears it's permanent). You really do know when you're overdoing it. I'm not talking that acute pain and sharp ear-ringing. It's like sitting out in the sun. If you're paying attention, you KNOW that you're getting a sunburn. You can put up rules of thumb to help people out, but there are absolutely cues from the body.

post #18968 of 22867

Instead of starting at 50% and slowly increasing why just not force yourself to say 65% percent. I use a constant volume level that I use all the time and my brain never wants more as I'm so used to this level that it will sound "wrong" if it gets louder. We humans are stubborn and want to experience what we are used to, I'd take advantage of that! :p Force yourself to a bit lower volume without changing the volume, in a few days you won't be missing that higher volume levels. But it's important to stay consistent, if you even once bring up the volume, you're back to square number 1 again. But if you did it long enough without pushing the volume the brain won't even desire any higher volume level. At least for me it has worked brilliantly.

post #18969 of 22867
Quote:
Originally Posted by RPGWiZaRD View Post
 

Instead of starting at 50% and slowly increasing why just not force yourself to say 65% percent. I use a constant volume level that I use all the time and my brain never wants more as I'm so used to this level that it will sound "wrong" if it gets louder. We humans are stubborn and want to experience what we are used to, I'd take advantage of that! :p Force yourself to a bit lower volume without changing the volume, in a few days you won't be missing that higher volume levels. But it's important to stay consistent, if you even once bring up the volume, you're back to square number 1 again. But if you did it long enough without pushing the volume the brain won't even desire any higher volume level. At least for me it has worked brilliantly.

i agree i don't actually touch the volume dial or button once its set.

 

if you turn it up even 1 click song after song after 15 songs on the iphone i think your at 90%-100%.

 

 

i start at literally 0 on the iphone and slowly move up within a span of 30 seconds. i know my volume level so thats hard to say for you, i guess but like i said for my iems (gr07 re400 at 32ohms or higher) i don't go above 4 clicks on the iphone. lower impedence like 18ohm monster turbines i use at 3 clicks. 

 

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by coachharpo View Post


Yes I agree that's why I would like to know what the loudest safe level is. I don't always listen to my music real loud, but for some songs I want to crank it up. I've just never tried the faders so I don't know what they do. On their description, to me it sounds like they only reduce the dangerous sounds. If they only make things less loud then yes there would be no point to me.

 

 

i think your better off doing what i'm doing starting from 0, because if you already start at 50% your brain already adjusts to that sound level and theres already music playing.

 

if you start at 0 with a familiar song obviously you won't hear any music but just whats going on around you.and slowly move up till you hear the nuances you usually hear at home(in a quiet area).

 

always listen to the lowest volume where you can still have adequate detail retrieval sounds vague but if you can't do that, their either 1) not sealing properly, iems or even on or over ears 2) their open back or theres too many vents on a closed back

 

Music doesn't = isolation sorry to say 

 

  (this is just what i believe anyway, but you should never turn up your music to the point where you hear nothing around you, thats already too loud, unless you got some etys, most don't have that kind of isolation).  

 

even with my iems i can still hear the subway cart moving and the rumbling and the annoucments going on at each stop but its less clear and quieter, and if i don't focus at all and just listen to my music or just daydream i don't know what subway stop i'm at

 

rule of thumb your ears get fatigued after you take off the headphones or iems in a quiet space 

 

for example if i'm listen to my gr07 at 50% on the bus and i arrive home into my room, where its quiet and i take if off then, my ears would feel fatigued, do i hear a loud ringing not really but everything around would seem very quiet. you adjust back within a few mins- hours but doing this often leads to permanent hearing damage. 

 

Occupational health course on sound and decibel levels- don't know how much that counts for accrediation but its better than nothing

post #18970 of 22867
To answer whoever was asking about the Faders + M100 combo:

I was the one to originally ask this question earlier. I bought the Faders both for any concerts I would go to and for wearing on airplanes. I haven't had any problems with my hearing since I started wearing Faders+M100 and listening at louder levels than I normally would.

Yes, the sound quality won't be as good, but it won't be in the first place due to surrounding noise from the engines on an airplane. Also, keep in mind these do leak quite a bit once you really start pushing them (more a reflection of how loud it can get than how it is at isolating), if you plan on wearing the combo in quieter environments.
post #18971 of 22867
The rule of thumb for setting volume is to find a quiet place, set the volume low, then adjust up to a comfortable listening level. And that's it. Don't start in an area with loud ambient noise. Don't crank the volume to overcome ambient noise. Don't start high and reduce volume. All of these will cause you to set the playback volume too high which can (and probably will) permanently damage your ears over time.
post #18972 of 22867
Quote:
Originally Posted by RPGWiZaRD View Post

Instead of starting at 50% and slowly increasing why just not force yourself to say 65% percent. I use a constant volume level that I use all the time and my brain never wants more as I'm so used to this level that it will sound "wrong" if it gets louder. We humans are stubborn and want to experience what we are used to, I'd take advantage of that! tongue.gif Force yourself to a bit lower volume without changing the volume, in a few days you won't be missing that higher volume levels. But it's important to stay consistent, if you even once bring up the volume, you're back to square number 1 again. But if you did it long enough without pushing the volume the brain won't even desire any higher volume level. At least for me it has worked brilliantly.
It's been proven that humans can consciously detect a 0.5db increase.
It's also been proven in blind testing that humans will choose a louder source over a quieter one as the "better" source.
This is one reason why so many A/B testing are bs because they haven't been properly level matched.
Turning a song up just notch makes it sound "better" at least in terms of your brains perception of sound (up to an certain a level of course until clarity is compromised and or it hurts)
Seriously why do you think the loudness wars started in the first place.

I see what you are saying. If I am listening to miles Davis I don't need the dial at 11. But if am listening to tool and Manaryd is about to let out one of his great 1 minute notes I love to crank that up to 11. Or some dub step or big beat (chemical bros) louder sounds better.
I am sorry. I just don't want to listen to Skrillex at Miles Davis listening levles. I'm not listening to Skrillex for the sound sage or the little details. I mean... His albums have a dynamic range of about 3. There are no details to be heard. (In seriousness the average for his CDs is DR5)
Edited by gr34td3str0y3r - 3/4/14 at 8:11am
post #18973 of 22867
Quote:
Originally Posted by gr34td3str0y3r View Post

That is is not at all why I started my query here.
Loud music sounds great sometimes. Now that I have cans that can drive loud music clearly, I am concerned at how loud and how long I can listen. I WANT to protect my ears, but I also want to enjoy some loud tracks from time to time.

It wasn't meant as a crtiticism, I just found it funny, that's all. It's all relative anyway. Listen to any piece of music in a busy (not noisy) environment and you'll use a certain level then, with the same music, go to a more peaceful place and your brain will tell you to turn it down. Finally, go to bed. Lie down with the same music and you'll be listening quieter still. Then turn out the lights. In theory it'll get quieter every time but of course we know electronics don't work this way and there will be an optimum volume level for any particular combination of equipment. Finding a place where you're close to that level and also safe for your ears is the key. IMO.
post #18974 of 22867
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zorrofox View Post


It wasn't meant as a crtiticism, I just found it funny, that's all. It's all relative anyway. Listen to any piece of music in a busy (not noisy) environment and you'll use a certain level then, with the same music, go to a more peaceful place and your brain will tell you to turn it down. Finally, go to bed. Lie down with the same music and you'll be listening quieter still. Then turn out the lights. In theory it'll get quieter every time but of course we know electronics don't work this way and there will be an optimum volume level for any particular combination of equipment. Finding a place where you're close to that level and also safe for your ears is the key. IMO.

 

I'll tell you what's funny: listening to music in bed and the dog wants to go for a walk, so you pause the music, take the dog out, and pop the headphones on and HOLY CRAP THE MUSIC IS VERY LOUD.

 

Time of day also matters. In the morning and late evening you need less volume because the ears are just more sensitive. 

post #18975 of 22867

George Carlin says it best.

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