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The diary entries of a little girl nearing 30! - Page 399  

post #5971 of 15119
Quote:
Originally Posted by turokrocks View Post

Please, I beg you....have mercy on me....... I am on a strict diet for the summer holiday....


a & w onion rings.JPG

 

Sometimes I'm so evil

a447e5ce_killer_smiley.png

post #5972 of 15119
Thread Starter 

This thread will make you hungry.

 

For audio gear, and now for food evidently.

post #5973 of 15119
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by DigitalFreak View Post


*big evil smiley*

 

 

The uneven stubble is the weirdest part....

post #5974 of 15119
Quote:
Originally Posted by MuppetFace View Post

 

 

The uneven stubble is the weirdest part....


Lol, yes I agree.

Seems the last couple of days I keep missing you when you're online. It's good to be able to chat with you again MF I hope you're doing well.

post #5975 of 15119
Quote:
Originally Posted by a_recording View Post  Oh I do. I generally keep on top of engadget, Ars, anandtech, etc.

 

I find that Engadget/Gizmodo are decent for general news/gossip, while Ars/Anandtech are better for slightly more technical stuff, but for true industry insider gossip, general semiconductor trends, and the like, I'd use a site like theINQUIRER. The site doesn't look like much, but it's great for inside information.


About the junk food thing: yes, I agree that if people are going to make junk food, they need to make it truly indulgent and decadent. I do find it pathetic that McD and all those corporations are neutering their products because of the lawsuits and stuff, but the general rule is that people should not eat junk food more than once or twice a month. I like junk food as much as the next guy, and it's really hard to keep that rate in check.

 

Of course, regardless of what you eat, I hope people are exercising 4-5 times a week, for at least 45 min. at a time, and with their heart rate reaching at least 155 bpm (this is a number that varies by age, sex, and general health, but this is a rule-of-thumb number that I use for a young person of average build) during each session.

 

Please do try to get yearly physicals, and total cholesterol should be under 200 mg/dL, though the biggest key is that your HDL should be above 55 mg/dL. This value will improve with increased exercise. If you maintain good HDL levels, your risk of getting coronary artery disease and atherosclerosis will be much lower. The other big thing to watch out for is your sugar intake. Insulin resistance (pre-diabetes) is a huge problem in the US and around the developed world that isn't getting any better. With more and more people getting Type II Diabetes every year, the chronic burden of health is just going to get worse. So try to limit your sugar intake to fruits, and if you have to consume soda (pop, whatever), try to switch to low-calorie diet alternatives. The risk of getting cancer from sucralose/aspartame is way lower than getting DM II from too much sugar consumption of high-fructose corn syrup.

 

The biggest key is to avoid a sedentary lifestyle, eat a balanced diet, and to get out and be active.

 

This message was brought to you by your resident health nanny, tomscy2000. No need for Michelle Obama here!


I listened briefly to the PFE232 today. It's... er... not worth the money. $599 is about two to three bones more than what I'm willing to pay for it, especially when Phonak's PFE112 is already so good.


And now... more temptation to balance out my previous patronizing message:

 


Edited by tomscy2000 - 5/5/12 at 2:16am
post #5976 of 15119
Quote:
Originally Posted by MuppetFace View Post

This thread will make you hungry.

 

For audio gear, and now for food evidently.

I know, I know.....Please be well soon....

 

Tomscy...You want me to be your patient....well not over my dead body.....Well you could be a doctor over my dead body....lost in any case....confused.gif


Edited by turokrocks - 5/5/12 at 2:23am
post #5977 of 15119

Btw, I thought I would ask this here:

 

Does any member of this fine thread have a pair of Denon D2000 / 5000 / 7000 earpads that are in good condition and which they no longer use? I'm wanting to do some experimentation with them and the SA5000.

 

I put up a classified here about it actually: http://www.head-fi.org/t/608755/wtb-stock-denon-d2000-d5000-d7000-earpads

post #5978 of 15119
Thread Starter 

I've been getting a lot of spam masquerading as Amazon notices. The e-mails will say "your order has been successfully canceled" and will list things you've never ordered. It looks surprisingly authentic, and the links are disguised well, but the domain isn't site-key verified which is the biggest tipoff. Just to forewarn those who do a lot of business on Amazon.

post #5979 of 15119
Quote:
Originally Posted by MuppetFace View Post

I've been getting a lot of spam masquerading as Amazon notices. The e-mails will say "your order has been successfully canceled" and will list things you've never ordered. It looks surprisingly authentic, and the links are disguised well, but the domain isn't site-key verified which is the biggest tipoff. Just to forewarn those who do a lot of business on Amazon.

 

When I get suspicious mail, I hover the mouse over the link and read the URL. If the domain is not specifically amazon.com, ebay.com, paypal.com... it's junk. (For that matter, if it's telling you to download a file, confirm information they already have, or reset something, it's also junk, but extra verification is nice.)

 

I'm less willing to dismiss notifications about things I hadn't ordered, since that is a possible indication that somebody had hijacked the account or a credit card.

post #5980 of 15119
Thread Starter 

This morning's brief impressions:

 

Shure SRH1440:

 

Packaging is pretty much identical to the SRH1840. Build quality is somewhere between the SRH940 and the SRH1840, a definite improvement in my opinion over its closed sibling but a bit more "plastic-y" compared to Shure's flagship. I do like it though: it's got a more substantial presence and seems pretty solid. Aesthetically it has its own appeal, complimenting the SRH1840 nicely when placed side-by-side. Sound-wise they're definitely closer to an "open SRH940" than the SRH1840. They have more energy compared to the laid back SRH1840, and like the SRH940, detail is more in-your-face so to speak. The balance is brighter than the SRH1840 overall, though perhaps slightly less so than the SRH940. The midrange is more constricted sounding than the SRH1840's, more intimate but lacking its subtle warmth. The bottom end also lacks that difficult-to-convey snarling tonality that I enjoy on the SRH1840. Overall I'm inclined to say the SRH1440 is slightly less sophisticated than the SRH1840 but energetic and eager. The SRH1840 strikes me as the most geared to listening enjoyment out of the Shure lineup; that is to say, the SRH1840 is more relaxing, refined, and less fatiguing to my ears. The SRH1440 on the other hand, like the SRH940, is more of a ruthless and analytic detail extractor. I'm not going to say the SRH1840 is superior to the SRH1440: the two are different enough to make it more a matter of personal preference. I think both are solid efforts from Shure.

 

B&W P5:

 

I really like these. The build materials are nice, and the modularity of the earpads is really nice; it's a feature I'd like to see implemented in other headphones. The actual construction of these could use a little work, though. I find the adjustment sliders a bit awkward and the pivot mechanism needs a bit of resistance as the earpads have a tendency to swing wildly about. The cabling that feeds through the headband into the earcups is also a bit poorly implemented: the right side of my set is much more taut than the left, making adjustment of the pads a bit uneven and awkward. It just doesn't feel quite right on my head. Also the cable fabric frays slightly in the adjustment process. In terms of sound, they have a definitely warmth and are far from accurate. Details take a back seat to euphony. And you know what? That's fine. The P5 makes it work, and it does so providing a relaxing blanket of sound. Apparently there are two versions of these, with a newer model featuring more exactly molded foam inside the cup assembly. Supposedly the older model had foam that blocked the drivers somewhat, causing a muffled sound? Inspecting my particular P5, the foam seems to indicate that these are the newer iteration. The sound is not muffled to my ears, though overall it is less detailed than some of its similarly priced competitors. I find these enjoyable given the right mood and source material.

post #5981 of 15119
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ardgedee View Post

 

When I get suspicious mail, I hover the mouse over the link and read the URL. If the domain is not specifically amazon.com, ebay.com, paypal.com... it's junk. (For that matter, if it's telling you to download a file, confirm information they already have, or reset something, it's also junk, but extra verification is nice.)

 

I'm less willing to dismiss notifications about things I hadn't ordered, since that is a possible indication that somebody had hijacked the account or a credit card.

 

Yeah, hovering over the link reveals the destination isn't Amazon. If one is in a hurry though I could see accidentally clicking on it, since these e-mails are pretty much exact copies of the ones Amazon sends. The sender is also disguised as Amazon, alluding my spam filter and turning up when searched for. However a quick check on Amazon shows the ordered items are just fabrications, thankfully.

post #5982 of 15119
Quote:
Originally Posted by MuppetFace View Post

B&W P5:

 

I find these enjoyable given the right mood and source material.

 

Similar conclusion to mine, heh. I've also found these far more comfortable than most on-ear phones. A somewhat idiosyncratic design, but it fulfills its intentions and so the real question is whether the sound is to ones tastes or not. Kind of a throwback to a 1970s hi-fi sound, in a way, with an added bass kick. The p5 doesn't suit my tastes, unfortunately. Or maybe fortunately. Hard for me to say. I'll ask my wallet.

post #5983 of 15119
Quote:
Originally Posted by ardgedee View Post

 

When I get suspicious mail, I hover the mouse over the link and read the URL. If the domain is not specifically amazon.com, ebay.com, paypal.com... it's junk. (For that matter, if it's telling you to download a file, confirm information they already have, or reset something, it's also junk, but extra verification is nice.)

 

I'm less willing to dismiss notifications about things I hadn't ordered, since that is a possible indication that somebody had hijacked the account or a credit card.

The problem with that, is that some sites use redirection. Which makes you vulnerable to unvalidated redirects and forwards. Let's say that you get an email from XXX@trustedsite.com saying that you can get an awesome deal on something. The only thing you need to do is click on their link: www.trustedsite.com/asfsafd/jkljkl/redirect.php?=www.supermalicioussite.com and with redirecting services made for twitter and all sorts of URL shorteners, there's just too many ways of hiding a malicious site within an adress. While a good strategy, there is a false sense of security bound to it.

 

Aside from hiding adresses in such manner, you're also susceptible of XSS, CSRF and all other sorts of ways to use legitimate sites with bad security configurations.

 

At the end of the day, there's just so much you can do. Just keep in mind that while good guys fight bad guys out there on a daily basis with technology and tools of all sorts, it comes down to you as the end-user - and malicious people know this. Social engineering is your worst enemy, so if you use common sense and secure thinking, you'll go a long way even though you, technically speaking, won't be secure.

post #5984 of 15119
Quote:
Originally Posted by Coq de Combat View Post

The problem with that, is that some sites use redirection. Which makes you vulnerable to unvalidated redirects and forwards. Let's say that you get an email from XXX@trustedsite.com saying that you can get an awesome deal on something. The only thing you need to do is click on their link: www.trustedsite.com/asfsafd/jkljkl/redirect.php?=www.supermalicioussite.com and with redirecting services made for twitter and all sorts of URL shorteners, there's just too many ways of hiding a malicious site within an adress. While a good strategy, there is a false sense of security bound to it.

 

Sure, although I know how to read URLs to recognize a redirect, not interact with URL shorteners, etc. URLs like http://amazon.com.example.com/foo are also pretty obvious.

 

Amazon.com et al don't have redir handlers anyway.

 

It's rare that I click on an URL in an email, for whatever it's worth. When I get email from a company that involves my account with them, I open a browser, go to the top-level page (since I'm too lazy even to have bookmarks, I'll type "am" and let the browser's autocomplete fill in the "azon.com"), log in, and then investigate. Worst that happens is a waste of a little time.

post #5985 of 15119
Quote:
Originally Posted by ardgedee View Post

 

Sure, although I know how to read URLs to recognize a redirect, not interact with URL shorteners, etc. URLs like http://amazon.com.example.com/foo are also pretty obvious.

 

Amazon.com et al don't have redir handlers anyway.

 

It's rare that I click on an URL in an email, for whatever it's worth. When I get email from a company that involves my account with them, I open a browser, go to the top-level page (since I'm too lazy even to have bookmarks, I'll type "am" and let the browser's autocomplete fill in the "azon.com"), log in, and then investigate. Worst that happens is a waste of a little time.

 

Some redirects can be cleverly hidden for internal use or something along those lines. It could be done from the inside as well, there are stories about the disgruntled coder/sysadmin/etc. My point is that while reading the URLs is a good strategy to weed out the really bad ones, there are very clever ways to lure you into traps - sometimes with very legitimate adresses - so you can't count on it being secure. But sure, you can weed out the really bad ones.

 

A few years ago, we had a phishing attack in Sweden. They somehow succeeded to plant a phishing site into the same URL as the bank itself. I don't remember the full details on how they did it though.

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