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The diary entries of a little girl nearing 30! - Page 10  

post #136 of 15119
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Quote:
Originally Posted by a_recording View Post

 

PON PON PON


 

 

I see the Japanese are still suffering the prolonged effects of radiation exposure...

 

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by ardgedee View Post

Quote:


I have no idea, to be honest. In this case, I saw somebody refer to it as a dubstep offshoot and while it doesn't sound like dubstep to me I can see there might be a relationship. Like I said, though, this isn't a genre I follow, so I'm gonna defer to people who know. I'm always happy to learn.

 

 

It's kind of dubstepy, but the beat isn't quite off-kilter enough. It's more like minimal dance music to my ears. I'm sure there's a sub-genre name for it somewhere.

 

Also dub isn't the same as dubstep. Dub is island music closer to reggae, but with the influence of heavy editing and electronic device processing, and dubstep is so named because it derives influence from the pioneers of the genre who used similar editing and mixing techniques to achieve the same kind of spacey ambience. Basic Channel and their offshoot Rhythm 'n' Sound are kind of the most famous example of the link between dub and what would eventually become dubstep.

 

(Just imagine I'm adjusting my nerd glasses as I say this.)


Edited by MuppetFace - 1/23/12 at 2:43am
post #137 of 15119

I wrote "dub-something" originally because I'd already heard of dubstep, dubwave, dubcore... I'm sure there are others, didn't know if this fit any of them. It's got the wub-wub-wub thing going, at any rate.

 

I've got a few hours in my collection of roots rhythm (he said, blankly), though the reggae subgenres involving live bands always interested me more than dub.

post #138 of 15119
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Maxvla View Post

Not so great in my experience. They were good headphones until I heard the price. I estimated their worth around $500-750. The rep said $2000 and I was literally stunned by how underwhelming they were for that money. My impressions can be found in the link in my sig.
Sign me up for your little club Muppet, but you gotta let me know when and what customs you end up with.. cause you know you'll get there eventually! (UERM, IMO!)


I've read your impressions before, and I've also heard some less-than-positive things from HeadphoneAddict. Basically the same thing: "Not worth anywhere near their asking price." I've also read some more positive impressions that still say "not quite worth their asking price" lol.

 

As for customs, I'll be ordering the Rooth LS8 after Chinese New Year and possibly the Gui Ling CX8 which is made by the same guy but seems to be taking the opposite approach to its driver array. That is, if I'm able to still get in contact with a certain member who isn't with us and is acting as the middle man for myself and said Chinese company.

 

I'm the sort of person who goes overboard with everything she does, so I'll probably end up with a few pairs of customs like Average_Joe. I'm actually trying to talk to some smaller companies to work out my reviewing their demo units. I figure that would be a fun way to try some of this stuff out beforehand. I'm eyeing the Spiral Ear SE 5-Way and Suyama FitEar 333 at the moment. I am very curious to try the UERM as well, since I like the company and I like super-linear reference monitors.

post #139 of 15119

 

It's kind of dubstepy, but the beat isn't quite off-kilter enough. It's more like minimal dance music to my ears. I'm sure there's a sub-genre name for it somewhere.

 

Also dub isn't the same as dubstep. Dub is island music closer to reggae, but with the influence of heavy editing and electronic device processing, and dubstep is so named because it derives influence from the pioneers of the genre who used similar editing and mixing techniques to achieve the same kind of spacey ambience. Basic Channel and their offshoot Rhythm 'n' Sound are kind of the most famous example of the link between dub and what would eventually become dubstep.

 

(Just imagine I'm adjusting my nerd glasses as I say this.)



Be sure you also have your pocket protector adjusted while you're at it.

 

1186512.jpg

Congratulate me Muppet I just bought a Westone 4

 


Edited by DigitalFreak - 1/23/12 at 2:56am
post #140 of 15119
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ardgedee View Post

I wrote "dub-something" originally because I'd already heard of dubstep, dubwave, dubcore... I'm sure there are others, didn't know if this fit any of them. It's got the wub-wub-wub thing going, at any rate.

 

I've got a few hours in my collection of roots rhythm (he said, blankly), though the reggae subgenres involving live bands always interested me more than dub.



Genres are silly aren't they? Though I suppose it stems from a need to classify things as succinctly as possible. I've had to live with the knowledge that one of my current favorite sub-genres is called "haunted house" or "witch house." I think either is an overwhelmingly derpy name for a genre. To top it off you have hipster blogs apparently debating with one another whether the genre, now pronounced dead by said blogs, ever really even existed in the first place. It's like, whoa man.

post #141 of 15119
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DigitalFreak View Post



Be sure you also have your pocket protector adjusted while you're at it.

 

/FACE

 

Congratulate me Muppet I just bought a Westone 4

 


The glasses are spot-on, but the mouth is a bit... "duuurrr" for a nerd. Maybe buck-teeth would be better.

 

And congratulations on your Westone 4. Hopefully you'll get much enjoyment from it before feeling the need to throw money at another audio company again.

post #142 of 15119

I'm already wadding up next week's paycheck in anticipation of going for the Q701s.

 

Here, AKG, CATCH!

 

post #143 of 15119


 



Quote:
Originally Posted by DigitalFreak View Post

Well so much for New Years resolutions and sticking to a shopping list. I just finished PMing a fellow head-fier who lives in my city. I just bought a set of Westone4's. Head-Fi will be the financial ruin of me.

 

LL.gif


its a downside but think of the upsides of head fi

post #144 of 15119
Thread Starter 

So one of the channels of i2ehan's brand new, babied, and well cared for K3003 just died on him.

 

frown.gif

post #145 of 15119

Quote:

Originally Posted by MuppetFace View Post

Genres are silly aren't they? Though I suppose it stems from a need to classify things as succinctly as possible. I've had to live with the knowledge that one of my current favorite sub-genres is called "haunted house" or "witch house." I think either is an overwhelmingly derpy name for a genre. To top it off you have hipster blogs apparently debating with one another whether the genre, now pronounced dead by said blogs, ever really even existed in the first place. It's like, whoa man.


It comes from the trainspotting nature inherent in music fandom. Get a couple old jazzbos fired up about the varieties of bebop and post-bop and you'll find the same intensity and hair-splitting going on.

 

In the case of electronic dance music (waves arms wildly at this point), it's pretty extreme but probably stems from how the stuff is made: People aren't working in groups here, they're mostly working in isolation or limited collaboration. You can't use bands as influences and references, and often it's hard to even use individuals as benchmarks within genres because they get bored and move on to new sounds too. It's a huge taxonomic mess. Love it.

post #146 of 15119
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ardgedee View Post

Quote:


It comes from the trainspotting nature inherent in music fandom. Get a couple old jazzbos fired up about the varieties of bebop and post-bop and you'll find the same intensity and hair-splitting going on.

 

In the case of electronic dance music (waves arms wildly at this point), it's pretty extreme but probably stems from how the stuff is made: People aren't working in groups here, they're mostly working in isolation or limited collaboration. You can't use bands as influences and references, and often it's hard to even use individuals as benchmarks within genres because they get bored and move on to new sounds too. It's a huge taxonomic mess. Love it.


Are you familiar with The Mighty Boosh? The show pokes fun at jazz enthusiasts quite a bit.

 

I've noticed a pattern with regards to pioneering artists of a particular genre. Usually said artist will help to "invent" a new genre, but then in an interview disavow doing anything to merit the new genre distinction. They claim they were just working on the fringes of a preexisting genre. I suppose the process is something like cellular mitosis. Eventually something buds off into a distinct entity once it reaches the point of no return.

 

I'm reminded of Pere Ubu, who gets credited with inventing the "avant garde" music genre. Apparently they meant it as a joke originally when asked what genre they played.

post #147 of 15119

 


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by MuppetFace View Post



Genres are silly aren't they? Though I suppose it stems from a need to classify things as succinctly as possible. I've had to live with the knowledge that one of my current favorite sub-genres is called "haunted house" or "witch house." I think either is an overwhelmingly derpy name for a genre. To top it off you have hipster blogs apparently debating with one another whether the genre, now pronounced dead by said blogs, ever really even existed in the first place. It's like, whoa man.



I think I was meant to follow up on a witch house band. I am a big fan of Crystal Castles and someone gave me a lead for new music.

 

I do think genres are never particularly helpful because I started my music education very late and end up listening to all kinds of things from all kinds of decades, to the point where what is derivative, evolutionary and innovative all blurs together for me.

post #148 of 15119
Quote:
Originally Posted by MuppetFace View Post

 

I see the Japanese are still suffering the prolonged effects of radiation exposure...


There are Japanese artists / art critics who would totally agree with you, though in a slightly more roundabout way. 

 

 

Quote:
Other works in the exhibition allude less directly to the dynamics of the war, but could not have come into being without the circumstances of the American occupation of and reconciliation with Japan. During the Allied Occupation from 1945 to 1951, Disney comics and animated films were sold and distributed throughout the country. As Kinsella writes, the large "pie eyes" and "distorted physical features" of the Disney characters strongly influenced local approaches to comic illustration. As Japanese animation and comics developed in the latter half of the twentieth century, the exaggerated round eyes of early Western comics became the standard convention for Japanese comics, and now seem more Japanese than American because of their entrenchment in the graphic traditions of anime and manga. Examples of this cultural exchange course throughout the exhibition, from the blank stares of groovisions' chappie 33 (2001), a lifesize army of genetically identical mannequins that have been individualized through cha nges in hair color, hairstyle, and other accoutrements; to the erotic manga of Henmaru Machimo. Large, round eyes have become rich signifiers of not only Western influence, but also innocence, childhood, and the unthreatening cuteness or kawaii that has become known around the world through such saccharine products as Hello Kitty or Pokemon. The artists included in Superflat deploy these signifiers in various ways, and to varied effect.

 

Superflat is a cultural theory that provides an interesting reading about Japanese pop culture and otaku subculture in general. 

http://web.archive.org/web/20071109195315/http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m0425/is_3_60/ai_79350872/pg_1

post #149 of 15119

Quote:

Originally Posted by MuppetFace View Post

I've noticed a pattern with regards to pioneering artists of a particular genre. Usually said artist will help to "invent" a new genre, but then in an interview disavow doing anything to merit the new genre distinction. They claim they were just working on the fringes of a preexisting genre. I suppose the process is something like cellular mitosis. Eventually something buds off into a distinct entity once it reaches the point of no return.

 

I'm reminded of Pere Ubu, who gets credited with inventing the "avant garde" music genre. Apparently they meant it as a joke originally when asked what genre they played.


Avant-garage!

 

I guess I should be ashamed to admit I like some of Ubu's early 2000s stuff more than the original records. Pennsylvania gets heavy rotation and the opening track is going to be one of my test numbers when the TF10 arrives. I think it's because sometime in the late 80s David Thomas figured, sod it, let's try regular tempos for a while, and stuck with it. Although the Datapanik... box remains on my wishlist. Should get around to buying that soon.

 

I also love him dearly for reissuing 15.60.75's first album, which I had on vinyl, which was destroyed in a flood, and I despaired of ever hearing it again. Sounds totally unlike any David Thomas project but still obviously originating from the same place and time.

 

I'm only slightly familiar with The Mighty Boosh. Only thing I can recall is something taking place in a panel truck, and a bear wanted them to play something on a cassette tape... or something? It was weird and hilarious and I'm missing out on something, I suspect.

 

Anyway. Genres. Yes. (slow sip of brandy, relaxes in overstuffed chair) Genres are not necessarily the construction of the artists, but as much or more often coined by those observing them. As a creator, you usually start in a particular realm and try establishing your style in it, and hey presto if you're any good you've either extended it or created something else entirely. To go about doing A New Thing in a deliberate and self-conscious way doesn't necessarily lead to interesting new things.

post #150 of 15119

Quote:

Originally Posted by a_recording View Post

I do think genres are never particularly helpful because I started my music education very late and end up listening to all kinds of things from all kinds of decades, to the point where what is derivative, evolutionary and innovative all blurs together for me.


On the contrary, genres are very helpful. They provide essential wayfinding to indicate that if you like A, you might like B, and if you're interested in artist X, he operates in the same sphere of influence as artist Y.

 

That genres are continually and intensely argued over, and chronically subdivided, is a nuisance and navigating them can be a chore, but if you can stay above the fray fighting over the distinctions it can help prevent spending a few hours digging through stacks of music that you could've known you'd never enjoy listening to.

 

(Edit: As appropriate for a conversation about electronic genres, this is post 909.)


Edited by ardgedee - 1/23/12 at 4:46am
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