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Loud enough volume vs. Fully driven - Page 2

post #16 of 22

TGOM,

 

   Now, in an objective, electronic engineering (?) perspective, which part am I supposedly missing out on, and why? The impedance graphs I have seen for the LCD-3 are almost ruler flat, so there shouldn't any notable changes in treble/mids/bass etc relative to each other? As for "soundstage", how would a varying amount of power affect that, isn't it more a function of the actual recording (mic setup)?

 

Enlighten me with some sound science :)

 

IN a recent email to Jason at Schiit,when I told him I had the LCD2..his reply was this:

  " but Lyr is really the amp for the LCD-2s. It was developed specifically for them."

 

Wouldn't this apply to the LCD3? ,as well?

I know you just got the Woo,but maybe this might be an alternative??

post #17 of 22

Quote:

Originally Posted by mikek200 View Post

IN a recent email to Jason at Schiit,when I told him I had the LCD2..his reply was this:

  " but Lyr is really the amp for the LCD-2s. It was developed specifically for them."

Wouldn't this apply to the LCD3? ,as well?

I know you just got the Woo,but maybe this might be an alternative??

I was aware of the Lyr, but since I already have a Schiit amp, wanted to stay with OTL tube sound and especially also wanted a switchable power supply when I move back to Europe, the Woo was an obvious choice, and I'm very happy with it.

 

-I- can't hear any lack of anything, but I'm curious what I'm theoretically supposed to be missing out on when not even pushing the amp anywhere near its limits... and why that would be.

post #18 of 22
IMO, you aren't missing out on anything, your amp seems to be fine. If it suits you then that's all that matters.
post #19 of 22

http://gilmore2.chem.northwestern.edu/articles/hearing_art.htm - my ~ 29th reference to this paper here

 

read it for examples of real world SPL, see that even 120 dB peak SPL may not be "too much" if you really want to recreate live music peaks, while 120 dB SPL continuously will cause permanent hearing damage in minutes

post #20 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by jcx View Post
see that even 120 dB peak SPL may not be "too much" if you really want to recreate live music peaks


The question is whether live concert SPL is actually worth reproducing, especially when hearing protection is recommended for performing or regularly attending such concerts (which makes the extreme loudness somewhat pointless).

 

post #21 of 22

120 dB peaks in concert are probably considerably higher than RMS volume. Most classical recordings are dynamically compressed, though not as much as other genres. So reproducing 120 dB peaks on the CD recording is likely to give a much higher RMS volume than the live concert. I don't think you'd want to do it.

post #22 of 22

I believe Bob Cordell found a CD with +24 peak vs ave - he used special fast peak capture hardware

 

these can be sub ms snare hit, cymbal crash 1st peak - "audiophile" reproduction wouldn't clip these in the amplifier

 

while you shouldn't listen all day at 100 dB ave - that is the reality of club jazz as one example - there's lots going on that makes actual live performance SPL levels define the experience - the music simply doesn't have the same perceptual effect played back 10-20 dB lower - even perceived frequency balance is off

 

http://www.blesser.net/downloads/eContact%20Loud%20Music.pdf

 

 

as a infrequent special treat I think "Rocking Out"  listening at 100 dB ave for 1/2 hr or so once a week isn't an unreasonable demand that $$$ amps, headphones should be able to handle without clipping 

 

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