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60s and 70s Progressive Rock Appreciation Thread

post #1 of 52
Thread Starter 
Let's start this thread.
I am personally a huge fan of late 60s and 70s progressive rock. Especially artists such as King Crimson, Emerson Lake & Palmer, Gentle Giant and Yes. biggrin.gif

Feel free to post any tracks/albums/live performances in this thread concerning this rather awesome era of progressive rock.
post #2 of 52
Alrighty, i'll try and be thorough:

KING CRIMSON:

1969 - In the Court of the Crimson King

king-crimson-in-the-court-of-the-crimson-king.jpg

WIKI Blurb:
Quote:
In the Court of the Crimson King is the 1969 debut album by the British progressive rock group King Crimson. The album reached No. 5 on the British charts, and is certified gold in the United States.[1]
The album is generally viewed as one of the strongest of the progressive rock genre, where King Crimson largely stripped away the blues-based foundations of rock music and mixed together jazz and Classical symphonic elements. In his 1997 book Rocking the Classics, critic and musicologist Edward Macan notes that In the Court of the Crimson King "may be the most influential progressive rock album ever released".[2] The Who's Pete Townshend was quoted as calling the album "an uncanny masterpiece".[3] In the Q & Mojo Classic Special Edition Pink Floyd & The Story of Prog Rock, the album came No. 4 in its list of "40 Cosmic Rock Albums".[4] The album was named as one of Classic Rock magazine's "50 Albums That Built Prog Rock".

Has been had quite a few releases on CD, vinyl and DVDA. Some notable pressings and editions:
MFSL's Vinyl
Korean Pressing Definitive Edition Remaster 1989
Pink Island Vinyl
30th Anniversary edition
40th anniversary edition

My personal favourite is the 40th Anniversary, and I don't think many people will be opposed to me calling it the best sounding edition.
It was done by Steven Wilson and Frippsicles at SWHQ.

Some youtube links from no defined edition (and weren't hand picked):

21st Century Schizoid Man
Epitaph
In the Court of the Crimson King

There was once a clayanimation clip with epitaph in the background, which some youtuber strung together. But I can't find it. It was quite nice.


1974 - Red

250px-AlbumArt-King_Crimson-Red_(1974).jpg

Wiki Blurb:
Quote:
Red is a 1974 album by progressive rock group King Crimson.
It was their last studio recording of the 1970s and the last before the lead member Robert Fripp temporarily disbanded the group.
The title track was ranked #87 in the 100 Greatest Guitar Songs list of Rolling Stone.

Same deal with In the Court... Has been released on DVDA, Vinyl and CD:
E'G's pressings
Any major first pressing
30th Anniversary
40th Anniversary

This album has some of my favourite guitar work by Fripp. Everyone's performance on this album is amazing, and mesmerized me for weeks after I first heard it. It also goes to show just how powerful a three piece band can sound (or power-trio, whatever you prefer).

Links:
Red
Starless
One More Red Nightmare


I'll flesh this out later on. Let me know what pressings/editions you think are worth noting. Or any information you'd like added.
I'd like to do this for quite a few bands.
post #3 of 52

I have almost all of KC, ELP and Yes on original LP in prime cond.

post #4 of 52

What do you guys think was the origins of prog rock?

 

For me the origins lie with psychedelia as that genre grew in the UK with the Beatles and the rock/pop side of the genre and the US with the Grateful Dead and the folky side of the genre. For me the movement really gets going in 1967 with The Piper at The Gates of Dawn, Disraeli Gears, Sgt Peppers and The Magical Mystery Tour and Their Satanic Majesties Request.

 

I know the likes of The Stones were jumping on the psychedelic band wagon for one album only, but that sets the scene for the genre being so influenced by other genres and creating the huge mix that still managed to be recognisable as a genre on its own.

post #5 of 52

I actually think that Abbey Road is a major milestone in the evolution of prog rock, with Tommy following very closely after. Of course, you can go further back and talk about The Beatles' and The Beach Boys' earlier psychedelic albums but something seems to click into focus on Abbey Road that just wasn't there before. The Kinks tend to get written out of prog history, but they were concept album pioneers and probably deserve more credit than they get. I should also mention S.F.Sorrow by The Pretty Things, so that I can appear to be really up on my prog history! wink_face.gif)

 

I actually grew up listening to the '80s prog revival groups (Marillion, Twelfth Night, Pallas) but if someone asked me for the definitive first wave albums I suppose I'd go for The Court of the Crimson King, Red, Foxtrot, The Lamb Lies Down On Broadway. I've always struggled a bit with Rush and Yes.

post #6 of 52

Rock Progresivo Italiano (RPI) had its best years on the 70's

 

Banco del mutuo Soccorso, has like 8 album in a row that were decreasing in quality but still awesome to listen to, all of them.

Le Orme, they started by mid 60's but the best came on the early 70s, from Collage (1971) to Contrappunti (1974)

Premiata Forneria Marconi, terrific 70s discography

 

also: Area, Museo Rosenbach, Il Balletto di Bronzo, Osanna (Palepoli,  superb album), Locanda Delle Fate, Quella Vecchia Locanda, Buon Vecchio Charlie ( first and only one album recorded on 1971 but released  until 1990, fantastic album)

 

post #7 of 52

Genesis with Peter Gabriel and the epic Suppers Ready are the epitomy of English prog rock.

post #8 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by Prog Rock Man View Post

Genesis with Peter Gabriel and the epic Suppers Ready are the epitomy of English prog rock.

King Crimson 69-74 would like to challenge that statement. Though I can't decide if Selling England is better than Nursery Cryme, they're pretty damn amazing albums.
post #9 of 52


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by JamesMcProgger View Post

Rock Progresivo Italiano (RPI) had its best years on the 70's

 

Banco del mutuo Soccorso, has like 8 album in a row that were decreasing in quality but still awesome to listen to, all of them.

Le Orme, they started by mid 60's but the best came on the early 70s, from Collage (1971) to Contrappunti (1974)

Premiata Forneria Marconi, terrific 70s discography

 

also: Area, Museo Rosenbach, Il Balletto di Bronzo, Osanna (Palepoli,  superb album), Locanda Delle Fate, Quella Vecchia Locanda, Buon Vecchio Charlie ( first and only one album recorded on 1971 but released  until 1990, fantastic album)

 



Interesting post ... tell me more!

 

My only knowledge of Italian prog is Goblin (who recorded the soundtracks for Dario Argento movies). Incidentally, people who only know Keith Emerson through bands should definitely check out the soundtrack for Inferno.

 

post #10 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by Prog Rock Man View Post

Genesis with Peter Gabriel and the epic Suppers Ready are the epitomy of English prog rock.



I love early Genesis so much. "the lamb lies down" is where the magic ends for me. from 1970 to 1974 they were flawless.

post #11 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sordel View Post


Interesting post ... tell me more!

 

My only knowledge of Italian prog is Goblin (who recorded the soundtracks for Dario Argento movies). Incidentally, people who only know Keith Emerson through bands should definitely check out the soundtrack for Inferno.

 

 


 

If you want to try one album from each band to start with I'd say:

 

Le Orme: Collage - here's a sample.

Banco del Mutuo Soccorso: Darwin - the whole album on youtube, -dont get too scared at Francesco operatic voice- one of my favorite prog albums ever.

Premiata Forneria Marconi: Per un Amico - here - they have a very smooth and chilled down sound, people often call them the italian Genesis.

 

and for the others check out the bibble of prog

 

and make sure you check out this unusual 1 album band Buon Vecchio Charlie

post #12 of 52

A quick mention for what I would consider the ultimate prog rock internet site

 

http://www.progarchives.com/

 

and their list of the top 100 prog albums, of which the top ten are

 

 


Edited by Prog Rock Man - 1/21/12 at 9:13am
post #13 of 52

Another band who I would rate, but are not usually associated with prog is The Moody Blues. The Days Of Future Passed came out in 1967 and had the hit single Knights In White Satin. Having a hit single is not really the done thing for a serious prog roc band, but in the context of the album it is a cracking track.

 

cover_28391121102008.jpg

 

 

 

 

post #14 of 52

Prog rock goes back a little further than that. It spawned out of Birmingham with Beatles wannabe bands like The Move and The Idle Race around 1967. Eventually these two bands merged and Roy Wood and Jeff Lynne formed Electric Light Orchestra. The Kinks were there at the beginning too. They were responding to Revolver and Abbey Road. The rest all started after Sgt Pepper.


Edited by bigshot - 1/21/12 at 11:13am
post #15 of 52

What I love the most about prog is its diversity and willingness to accept all sorts of styles of music into the genre.

 

Psychedlia came from jazz improvisation using rock instruments - Pink Floyd

 

Using rock instruments in an experimental way - The Beatles

 

Combining genres as diverse as pop and orchestral - The Moody Blues

 

Accepting any form of music can be adapted to a progessive style - Their Satanic Majesties Request and Disraeli Gears

 

Taking an age old form of music and updating it - the Canterbury folk prog scene

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