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Poll: Can you hear sound over 20kHz? - Page 6

Poll Results: Can you hear sound over 20kHz?

 
  • 23% (100)
    Yes
  • 76% (319)
    No
419 Total Votes  
post #76 of 543

male 22 17.4 on the mosquito site using brainwivz B2 at normal hearing volume. Yea earbud and home with fridge and 2 computers going. Blaming on playing flute for a decade etysmile.gif

post #77 of 543
Quote:
Originally Posted by devouringone3 View Post



The numbers on YouTube and especially on MosquitosRingtones are inflated and distorted. 21 and 22 kHz must be arround 13 to 14 kHz, not more.



 


exactly. i been trying to say that. people think they can hear 21khz in these test but they really can't. it's just harmonics. it's not actually fundamental 21khz tone. that's why these tests people try are not legit. no one wants to listen so let them believe what they want. i bet barely anyone around hear can hear electronics around their house. lot of monitors,modems and tv's give off a fundamental 16khz tone when on standby or turned on first time of the day. can people hear their monitor or modem when they walk by it? probably most likely not. i get annoyed with my modem and still hear it from upstairs.
post #78 of 543

I did the test with the NCH Tone Generator. And electronics' operation noise around the house do annoy me too.

post #79 of 543
Quote:

Originally Posted by devouringone3 View Post
 

The numbers on YouTube and especially on MosquitosRingtones are inflated and distorted. 21 and 22 kHz must be arround 13 to 14 kHz, not more.

 

I did a quick FFT of a couple of mosquito ring tones (downloaded in MP3 and WAV format), and the frequency is accurate. However, lower frequency audio may still result from playback problems, aliasing, or intermodulation distortion. Especially low quality onboard integrated audio will often play high frequency tones incorrectly with high levels of non-harmonic distortion products at lower frequencies.

 

post #80 of 543

Decided to try again through headphones at my usual listening volume. Audacity generated tones -> Lavry DA11 -> Stax SR009, made it up to 19khz, then a huge drop-off, but still something at 20khz. I trust the 009's treble consistency over that of an audiometric headphone.

post #81 of 543
Using a sine generator I could hear 22 kHz. That was as high as it would go but that seems wrong.

That ringtone test I heard up to 19 kHz, the same I could hear on an MP3 I downloaded off a different site.

Male, 21.
post #82 of 543
Thread Starter 

I checked frequencies of files over and over again using Spectrogram (they were spot on accurate, creating them through Adobe Audition CS5.5). I even used an external sound card + converter + Anthem D2 A/V+ Axiom A1400-8 + Mythos ST System 5.1 surround combo (18k system). I could still hear 21Khz. So, I’m sorry, but I seriously doubt that you can only hear up to 12Khz or 16 Khz. Not to mention, at least half of people here are audiophiles with high quality audio gear; who Happen to use their own files and could still hear over 16Khz no problem.

 

Last but not least, everything you have said on this thread turned out to be false:

No human can hear above 20Khz. Idaho state University states otherwise with a 1000 test subject smaple (Max human hearing is 23khz).

No headphone can surpass 20Khz frequency. Yet you admit you have a sony 100khz headphone.

Claiming that no one here has over 16KHz hearing, yet you somehow have super human hearing and can hear a modem on stand by and still hear it from upstairs.

 

Please forgive me if I choose not to take you seriously.


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by RexAeterna View Post


exactly. i been trying to say that. people think they can hear 21khz in these test but they really can't. it's just harmonics. it's not actually fundamental 21khz tone. that's why these tests people try are not legit. no one wants to listen so let them believe what they want. i bet barely anyone around hear can hear electronics around their house. lot of monitors,modems and tv's give off a fundamental 16khz tone when on standby or turned on first time of the day. can people hear their monitor or modem when they walk by it? probably most likely not. i get annoyed with my modem and still hear it from upstairs.


 

post #83 of 543
i never mention human hearing limitation. please point where i said 16khz was person's limit? i said no such thing. i said electronics give off a fundamental 16khz tone. that's all. i never said anyone right or wrong either so don't know why getting all offensive. i ran the test on multiple sources and sites too. didn't want to believe it but i tried on the site and even on tone generators as well and i was able to pick up 22khz tones as well even though they were faint at my normal listening level testing multiple headphones and even speakers. i will stay open though and curious if all i'm picking up is harmonics or not. can't say for sure. if your curious too i'm 24, but i still find age has nothing to do with someones hearing ability. like to mention these tones too really don't translate well into real world of music most of the time, if not at all.
post #84 of 543
Quote:
Originally Posted by RexAeterna View Post

i never mention human hearing limitation. please point where i said 16khz was person's limit? i said no such thing. i said electronics give off a fundamental 16khz tone. that's all. i never said anyone right or wrong either so don't know why getting all offensive. i ran the test on multiple sources and sites too. didn't want to believe it but i tried on the site and even on tone generators as well and i was able to pick up 22khz tones as well even though they were faint at my normal listening level testing multiple headphones and even speakers. i will stay open though and curious if all i'm picking up is harmonics or not. can't say for sure. if your curious too i'm 24, but i still find age has nothing to do with someones hearing ability. like to mention these tones too really don't translate well into real world of music most of the time, if not at all.


You also said right here:

 

i bet barely anyone around hear can hear electronics around their house. lot of monitors,modems and tv's give off a fundamental 16khz tone when on standby or turned on first time of the day. can people hear their monitor or modem when they walk by it? probably most likely not. 

 

Which I take as no one can hear those higher frequencies. You said that, no one else. And for the record, if I am in the living room, I can tell when a tv is on in the other room, even if the sound is muted. 

post #85 of 543
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mischa23v View Post

No headphone can surpass 20Khz frequency. Yet you admit you have a sony 100khz headphone.



Sony has a headphone which may move a little air at that frequency, however it is doubtful that they have a 100khz headphone. Few measurement microphones even go that high and for various reasons headphone response tends to dip rapidly after 10khz. Those specs are nothing more than marketing.

 

Head-fiers certainly seem to be bucking the trend as far as high-frequency sensitivity goes. We're an odd sample group: headphone users who haven't blasted their hearing out of commission.

post #86 of 543
Quote:
Originally Posted by tmars78 View Post



You also said right here:

i bet barely anyone around hear can hear electronics around their house. lot of monitors,modems and tv's give off a fundamental 16khz tone when on standby or turned on first time of the day. can people hear their monitor or modem when they walk by it? probably most likely not. 


Which I take as no one can hear those higher frequencies. You said that, no one else. And for the record, if I am in the living room, I can tell when a tv is on in the other room, even if the sound is muted. 

but i said ''i bet''. wasn't indicating it directly. must of misunderstood. also, Mischa23v, i never admitted the sony headphone can get to 100khz since i said it was all marketing specs, cause you were trying to site out some in ear monitor specs to me saying it can go up to 50khz or something. i still say it's all marketing specs like i said before.
post #87 of 543

30 - 17k

 

18 years old

post #88 of 543

20 - 18k

Male 16

post #89 of 543

16k-17k is my limit, which is pretty much where I've been for a while.  Makes Grado headphones bearable >_>'

 

The amusing thing here is people aren't considering the possibility of electronic or transducer distortions creating an issue . . .

post #90 of 543
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shike View Post

16k-17k is my limit, which is pretty much where I've been for a while.  Makes Grado headphones bearable >_>'

 

The amusing thing here is people aren't considering the possibility of electronic or transducer distortions creating an issue . . .


While I think electronic distortion from compression (the online files, at least until someone did an FFT on them) and software/DAC artifacts are plausible, I don't think transducer distortions are really going to factor much in on the high frequency side of things.  We're talking single frequency tones, so no IMD, and harmonic distortion products are going to be higher in frequency than what we're testing.

 

On the other hand, low frequency tests are very much subject to the effects of harmonic distortion.

 

I think that system frequency response (primarily the transducers but also the room for speakers) is going to have a much bigger effect on perception.

 

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