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Poll: Can you hear sound over 20kHz? - Page 36

Poll Results: Can you hear sound over 20kHz?

 
  • 23% (100)
    Yes
  • 76% (321)
    No
421 Total Votes  
post #526 of 543

 

edit: I just realized that you can alter the results by trial and error (just tick different ones n click submit until you get 10/10) so this screenshot won't really prove anything lol. You'll have to take my word for it :tongue:


Edited by elmoe - 3/9/14 at 1:21pm
post #527 of 543

F*** ME!!!

 

Amazing!  I declare elmo champion of Head-Fi! 

:beerchug:


Edited by SP Wild - 3/9/14 at 1:23pm
post #528 of 543

I'm not entirely sure this is a valid test though, because one of the samples really bothers me (almost hurts to listen), the other too but much less, which is how I can differentiate.

post #529 of 543

Well, no way in hell I could DBT 22khz and 20khz white noise.  I can't hear the difference looking at them.

 

Maybe start at 10khz and work your way up?

 

Edit: I can't not can...


Edited by SP Wild - 3/9/14 at 1:46pm
post #530 of 543

10/10 at 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15 those were all pretty easy

9/10 at 16 from here on I have to listen for it

10/10 at 17

9/10 at 18

9/10 at 19

 

The 22khz sample really bothers me, I rushed through but I'm pretty sure I could do 10/10 for all of em if I tried again.

 

edit: nevermind 


Edited by elmoe - 3/9/14 at 1:39pm
post #531 of 543

I believe you!

 

The screenshot shows the two options being tested...unless you start messing with photoshop or something...that is dishonest.

post #532 of 543

Don't damage your hearing by boosting the volume of frequencies at the edge of your ability to hear. It may not sound loud, just like a little bit of sound pressure, but in reality it is ear splitting and might damage your hearing.

 

Ability to hear ultra high frequencies is not an advantage. It's a liability. Those frequencies do nothing for the sound quality of music. All it can mean is that bad ballasts in fluorescent lights and squeal from CRT monitors will drive you nuts when it doesn't bother anyone else.

post #533 of 543
Quote:
Originally Posted by bigshot View Post
 

Don't damage your hearing by boosting the volume of frequencies at the edge of your ability to hear. It may not sound loud, just like a little bit of sound pressure, but in reality it is ear splitting and might damage your hearing.

 

Ability to hear ultra high frequencies is not an advantage. It's a liability. Those frequencies do nothing for the sound quality of music. All it can mean is that bad ballasts in fluorescent lights and squeal from CRT monitors will drive you nuts when it doesn't bother anyone else.

 

Have you tried the DBT...its different...it doesn't play singular tones...you can't cheat by boosting the volume!

 

I'm starting a thread.

post #534 of 543

Yeah I turned the volume up a little too much on those mosquito tones I think, no damage but I won't be trying it again anytime soon. I'm pretty sure my hearing is damaged from the many years of bass playing anyway (especially when I was a kid and jammed frequently without earbuds). People often tell me I listen to music too loud even though it seems fine to me.

 

Some things do drive me nuts (like computer fans, sometimes they're really high pitched) but I learned to live with it. 

post #535 of 543

I can generally hear up to about 18kHz.

Male, 19.

post #536 of 543
Strange thing, I hear up to 18kHz, but I don't hear anything at 19kHz. Then I hear a quiet ringing at 20kHz, and even bit louder at 21kHz and nothing at 22kHz. My gear is O2+ODAC combo and Sennheiser Momentum headphones. InnerFidelity measurements show that these headphones have a dip at 19kHz but then go sharply up at 20-22kHz.

It makes me wonder if we actually can hear very high frequencies, but our audio systems can't reproduce them well.
post #537 of 543
Quote:
Originally Posted by ieee754 View Post

Strange thing, I hear up to 18kHz, but I don't hear anything at 19kHz. Then I hear a quiet ringing at 20kHz, and even bit louder at 21kHz and nothing at 22kHz. My gear is O2+ODAC combo and Sennheiser Momentum headphones. InnerFidelity measurements show that these headphones have a dip at 19kHz but then go sharply up at 20-22kHz.

It makes me wonder if we actually can hear very high frequencies, but our audio systems can't reproduce them well.

 

I think it's this particular test that's somehow bugged, because I tried a few different ones and I couldn't hear anything past 17kHz for the majority.

post #538 of 543
Quote:
Originally Posted by elmoe View Post
 

 

I think it's this particular test that's somehow bugged, because I tried a few different ones and I couldn't hear anything past 17kHz for the majority.


Since this IS the sound-science forum :

Yes, that would be the obvious logical conclusion ... Especially when considering :

 

 

Quote:

Yeah I turned the volume up a little too much on those mosquito tones I think, no damage but I won't be trying it again anytime soon.

I'm pretty sure my hearing is damaged from the many years of bass playing anyway (especially when I was a kid and jammed frequently without earbuds).

People often tell me I listen to music too loud even though it seems fine to me.

 

Some things do drive me nuts (like computer fans, sometimes they're really high pitched) but I learned to live with it. 

 

post #539 of 543
The difference between 17kHz and 20 is only a note or two. That is right up at the edge of human hearing where everyone's perception starts to roll off. No one should be surprised or worried if they can't hear over 17kHz. That is pretty normal.
post #540 of 543
Interesting... I'll try it later.
But I am not holding my breath for capping at 16.
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