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Poll: Can you hear sound over 20kHz? - Page 35

Poll Results: Can you hear sound over 20kHz?

 
  • 23% (101)
    Yes
  • 76% (324)
    No
425 Total Votes  
post #511 of 543
Quote:
Originally Posted by ab initio View Post

 

You guys must all have blown your eardrums. I can easily hear well over 20kHz very_evil_smiley.gif. For example, I created a [.wav file] that plays a sweep from 11kHz all the way up to 44kHz and I can easily hear it the whole time.

 

Okay, now where is the trollface emoticon?

 

okay,, obviously I am being facetious. If you haven't yet figured out what I did, then you should check out the wiki article on aliasing and Nyquist frequency. Because the sample rate of the wav file is 44100 Hz, the nyquist frequency is 22050Hz, which means the part of the signal above 22050Hz is aliased to a sound less than 22050Hz; hence it is audible with this sampling rate. Okay, stop flaming me now, thanks!

 

Cheers!

 

I'm afraid I may have concealed the hidden message in my post a little too well. As with anything, always read the fine print.

 

Cheers!

post #512 of 543
Quote:

Flame flame flame!  OMG you're crazy, blah dee blah, and all the other rants. ;) ;) ;) ;)

 

;)  I'm also not sure if my sarcastic response came off as serious? haha

post #513 of 543
Quote:
Originally Posted by ab initio View Post

 

I'm afraid I may have concealed the hidden message in my post a little too well. As with anything, always read the fine print.

 

Cheers!

Ya think?  On my screen your original "fine print" is a very light grey, barely one shade darker than the background color, and in 1pt type.  I never saw it. 

post #514 of 543
Quote:

Lastly, you could have simply been hearing the 20khz frequency it emitted, especially if it emitted it at a loud volume, hence the need for hearing protection they had.  Can't say for sure, but it is possible to hear to 20hz.  It is scientifically tested and proven.  It's just that it takes perfectly health hearing to do so.  In this day and age that is becoming far less common. :-/

 Your last comment is sad, but true isn't it!  When ever I hear one of those Boomer cars driving down the road I am thinking, 'What must it be like to actually be INSIDE that car, my god!

post #515 of 543
Quote:
Originally Posted by HPiper View Post

 Your last comment is sad, but true isn't it!  When ever I hear one of those Boomer cars driving down the road I am thinking, 'What must it be like to actually be INSIDE that car, my god!

 

I get pissed when being in traffic next to these idiots or when they drive around late at night blasting that sh*t.... It's very obnoxious. Simply no taste for quality obviously ;-). I think a big part of the appeal is the attention they feel they are garnering from these turbo fart-cannons.


Edited by lee730 - 6/27/13 at 2:58am
post #516 of 543
Quote:
Originally Posted by lee730 View Post

Simply no taste for quality obviously ;-). I think a big part of the appeal is the attention they feel they are garnering from these turbo fart-cannons.

 

Excellent. haha

 

I had a friend that was all about maximum bass.  He thought he was getting awesome "quality", but all he was doing was getting deeper louder bass.  He had multiple 15" woofers and a ridiculous power amplifier.  I had the unfortunate chance to sit in his car more than once while he blasted his bass heavy music.  I can say it really was for the attention in his case.  Which is funny, because I suppose people of the same mind might think it was great, but most people find it obnoxious.  I found it stupid. :-P haha.  If your car rattles from the bass, what do you think will happen to your ears?

 

I can absolutely appreciate a real bass-head wanting a nice amp and subs to add some nice deep tight impact bass to his speaker system, but there comes a point where you're listening to bass, not music.  Even then, if that's your thing, that's cool.  But I feel bad for your ears, and the ears of your unsuspecting passengers...

post #517 of 543
Quote:
Originally Posted by luisdent View Post
But I feel bad for your ears, and the ears of your unsuspecting passengers...

…and the ears of any pedestrian or driver in a city block radius :(

post #518 of 543
Quote:
Originally Posted by lee730 View Post

turbo fart-cannons.

+1 for turbo fart cannons

Pffft pffft pffffffffffft!
post #519 of 543
Quote:
Originally Posted by ab initio View Post


+1 for turbo fart cannons

Pffft pffft pffffffffffft!

 

O.k.  I swear, I just loaded this page while I was lifting a cheek and letting one rip.  I'm not even joking.  I'm almost laughing to death. My wife can't believe I'm telling everyone too ;)  But timing like that only comes once in a great while. :-P

post #520 of 543

So the Mrs. survived the fallout? ;).
 


Edited by lee730 - 6/27/13 at 8:14pm
post #521 of 543

These tests are fun, but I wouldn't consider them scientific.

 

As a person who has taken hearing tests, they put you in sealed rooms with noise isolating rubber domes on your ears.  And for general listening, they rarely test over 4-6 KHz.  That is considered the top end of normal listening.  So for those commenting about legal deafness, please do a bit of research and save us from reading online speculative banter.

 

Also, I see many are using open headphones for these tests.  Not really possible to do an accurate test with open headphones.  Ambient dB is probably around 20-40 dB for you.  Meaning, we all get used to ambient noise.  And for those who have tinnitis, well, they are always hearing a ringing noise, so they probably hear ambient noise even when it doesn't exist.  Ambient noise can either boost the sound or offset it.  Kind of the way noise cancelling headphones work, if your ambient noise oscillates off phase as one of the tones in these tests, it may actually be cancelling out the tone.

 

So I wouldn't be too nervous if you have a hard time hearing these frequencies.  But they maybe a good indicator you need to go see an ear doctor.  Me for instance could hear 21kHz like it was 14kHz.  The volume was ear piercingly loud.  But 20kHz was a faint and barely audible.  22kHz was also very faint.  I'm a weird nut though, I'm that 1% that can hear dog whistles.  My friend has a ski cabin in Vermont, and he has a dog deterrent outside his house.  It's basically a supersonic speaker that is designed to irritate dogs and to prevent them from entering their premises.  Many are probably familiar with these devices.  They operate at various frequencies, but generally at or above 20kHz.  Of my friends, I am the only one who can hear the sound coming from it.  I guess it also makes sense that of my friends, I'm the only audiophile.

post #522 of 543
Quote:
Originally Posted by Eargasmo View Post
 

These tests are fun, but I wouldn't consider them scientific.

 

As a person who has taken hearing tests, they put you in sealed rooms with noise isolating rubber domes on your ears.  And for general listening, they rarely test over 4-6 KHz.  That is considered the top end of normal listening.  So for those commenting about legal deafness, please do a bit of research and save us from reading online speculative banter.

 

Also, I see many are using open headphones for these tests.  Not really possible to do an accurate test with open headphones.  Ambient dB is probably around 20-40 dB for you.  Meaning, we all get used to ambient noise.  And for those who have tinnitis, well, they are always hearing a ringing noise, so they probably hear ambient noise even when it doesn't exist.  Ambient noise can either boost the sound or offset it.  Kind of the way noise cancelling headphones work, if your ambient noise oscillates off phase as one of the tones in these tests, it may actually be cancelling out the tone.

 

So I wouldn't be too nervous if you have a hard time hearing these frequencies.  But they maybe a good indicator you need to go see an ear doctor.  Me for instance could hear 21kHz like it was 14kHz.  The volume was ear piercingly loud.  But 20kHz was a faint and barely audible.  22kHz was also very faint.  I'm a weird nut though, I'm that 1% that can hear dog whistles.  My friend has a ski cabin in Vermont, and he has a dog deterrent outside his house.  It's basically a supersonic speaker that is designed to irritate dogs and to prevent them from entering their premises.  Many are probably familiar with these devices.  They operate at various frequencies, but generally at or above 20kHz.  Of my friends, I am the only one who can hear the sound coming from it.  I guess it also makes sense that of my friends, I'm the only audiophile.

 

Sigh of relief after reading this, at 28yrs old I can't hear the 20KHz on that mosquito website. 20 years of jamming might've done some damage though.

post #523 of 543

I recently did a hearing test on line with test tones from 8khz up.  I could swear I could 'sense' up to 21khz with test tones.  But I call myself out and I think this DBT is much better to asses where your hearing rolls off realistically.

 

http://www.audiocheck.net/blindtests_frequency.php?frq=10

 

It basically plays white noise full range or white noise cut-off from selectable frequencies from 10khz all the way to 20khz.

 

I got 10/10 up to 13khz easily.

I got 10/10 at 14khz with A LOT of going back and forth.

At 15khz and beyond...they were random chance.

post #524 of 543

Cool, gonna try that out now.

 

Ok well, I scored 10/10 fairly easily on 20kHZ. I guess my hearing isn't as bad as I thought!


Edited by elmoe - 3/9/14 at 1:09pm
post #525 of 543

Wow.  I'm highly impressed, easy DBT between white noise up to 22khz and white noise up to 20khz.  Now I really feel old.  :L3000: 

 

Screen shot?


Edited by SP Wild - 3/9/14 at 1:14pm
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