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Poll: Can you hear sound over 20kHz? - Page 31

Poll Results: Can you hear sound over 20kHz?

 
  • 23% (100)
    Yes
  • 76% (323)
    No
423 Total Votes  
post #451 of 543
One tech note: many sounds can change frequency when reflected (partially absorbed) and the human ear can sense the lower frequency reverberations. This can happen inside a pair of headphones (and in some cases, inside a (hairy - I know, gross!) ear canal. That skews listening tests in the 22kHz range.
post #452 of 543

The same could be said about an ear canal shape that actually amplifies that signal or signals even more.
 

post #453 of 543
Oh yeah? Well... I can hear 500 hz. So THERE!!!! Beat that! :-p
post #454 of 543

25 here.  at 1/3 full volume on my laptop using JH 16's, I could hear up to 18khz.  When I turned the volume up 3/4 full I could hear up to 22khz, but I mean we are talking a very high pitched and faint beep.

post #455 of 543

10hz sounds like a rumble but I suspect thats the phones and not my hearing, 20hz can hear that

http://www.audiocheck.net/audiotests_frequencychecklow.php

post #456 of 543

lol I can hear it at 10 hz. Its a pitched noise with a very faint rumble as well.... It applies to the other frequencies going up with the frequency noise getting louder and louder as it goes up... Goes all the way to 200 and then cuts off.


Edited by lee730 - 2/12/13 at 10:45pm
post #457 of 543

yeah it seems to abruptly end at 200hz for me too.

post #458 of 543
Quote:
Originally Posted by lee730 View Post

lol I can hear it at 10 hz. Its a pitched noise with a very faint rumble as well.... It applies to the other frequencies going up with the frequency noise getting louder and louder as it goes up... Goes all the way to 200 and then cuts off.

 

The faint rumble could very well be just distortion from your headphones. Dynamic drivers often do not handle loud low frequency sine waves very well.

post #459 of 543

I know this will come off as close minded but I personally struggle with the fact that 87 people believe they can hear over 20kHz. I don't even know if what I'm hearing that high is even that frequency or just noise from my selected tranducer. On the other side of the spectrum, I can hear sounds from my dynamic tranducers going down to 5Hz but I'm not going to kid myself that I'm hearing that frequency. I'm only hearing my tranducers going backwards and forwards 5 times a second, flapping the dust covers in the process.

 

It may very well be that 87 people can actually hear a proper 20kHz and above sine wave but until further notice I'm just going to believe bats and dogs learned to type and not let this bother my tired little mind any further.

 

And no, I haven't read through this thread.

post #460 of 543
Quote:
Originally Posted by temporaryname View Post

I know this will come off as close minded but I personally struggle with the fact that 87 people believe they can hear over 20kHz. I don't even know if what I'm hearing that high is even that frequency or just noise from my selected tranducer. On the other side of the spectrum, I can hear sounds from my dynamic tranducers going down to 5Hz but I'm not going to kid myself that I'm hearing that frequency. I'm only hearing my tranducers going backwards and forwards 5 times a second, flapping the dust covers in the process.

 

It may very well be that 87 people can actually hear a proper 20kHz and above sine wave but until further notice I'm just going to believe bats and dogs learned to type and not let this bother my tired little mind any further.

 

And no, I haven't read through this thread.


You do that my friend lol ;).

post #461 of 543
Quote:
Originally Posted by stv014 View Post

 

The faint rumble could very well be just distortion from your headphones. Dynamic drivers often do not handle loud low frequency sine waves very well.


The thing is that it is present on all of that frequency sweep and gets louder as it goes higher. But I'm also hearing the high pitched noise throughout all the test tones but as it goes higher there is more rumble present.  The lower it is I detect that high pitched frequency more than the rumble (the rumble is near to none at the beginning of the test).

post #462 of 543
Quote:
Originally Posted by lee730 View Post

 

The thing is that it is present on all of that frequency sweep and gets louder as it goes higher. But I'm also hearing the high pitched noise throughout all the test tones but as it goes higher there is more rumble present.  The lower it is I detect that high pitched frequency more than the rumble (the rumble is near to none at the beginning of the test).

 

Do you mean there is "rumble" while playing high frequency (>10 kHz) tones ? That might be aliasing from low quality sample rate conversion.

post #463 of 543

At 10 Htz I can barely hear any sort of rumble (like deep, deep bass rumble) but I mainly hear the high pitched noise. As it goes higher up 20, 30 40 etc; that rumble (bass) gets louder yet tightens up the higher it gets and the pitch in the bass extends noticeably higher each step. The high pitched noise remains constant and the pitch goes higher, the higher the frequency. So I'm hearing two frequencies in tandem., both change the higher up the frequency goes.


Edited by lee730 - 2/13/13 at 12:39pm
post #464 of 543

at 10hz it felt more like the headphones were moving than hearing sound.

post #465 of 543

Distortion. People aren't hearing tones outside the range of normal human hearing, they're hearing the error caused by their headphones trying to play frequencies they weren't designed to play.

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