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Poll: Can you hear sound over 20kHz? - Page 4

Poll Results: Can you hear sound over 20kHz?

 
  • 23% (100)
    Yes
  • 76% (321)
    No
421 Total Votes  
post #46 of 543
well with my AKG K518 DJ i can still hear 17khz.
My hearing range is from roughly 21hz to 17khz (using K518 DJ)
post #47 of 543
Thread Starter 

Your contradicting yourself ,” the big majority of the class at 20 kHz, there were four girl's hands remaining at 21 kHz, and only the very youngest of our class could hear the 22 kHz one, she was also 18 about to turn 19.”



 

Quote:
Originally Posted by devouringone3 View Post

Yep.



 

post #48 of 543
Thread Starter 

JH16 pro Details

  • JH16 Pro, perfectly tuned with the JH-3A Amplifier
  • 10HZ to 23k Frequency Response (No, that's not a typo; 23k!)
  • + or - .25dB Resolution for Predetermined Audio Signature
  • Phase and Time Correct
  • Unsurpassed Detail, Soundstage, Accuracy
  • Available in Midnight Black
  • Offered with 48" or 64" Clear Cable
  • 2 way mode allows for perfectly flat response flat low end to 10Hz
  • Optional JH16 Adapter (8pin to 3.5mm) allows use with any source


 

You should really check your facts. with LOD-3 going up to 50KHz, and Mythos ST at 23k.

Quote:
Originally Posted by RexAeterna View Post

also lets mention headphones as well. headphones can not and i repeat can not reach 20khz. there is a few that are relativity flat up to around 20khz but most headphones are not tuned that way anymore to make up for bad piercing modern recordings. we have what's called ''modern highs''. what that is the headphone or speaker gently starts to roll-off at after 10khz and just completely drops around after 14k(around the air frequencies). yea some might cause slight peak to give an impression of more ''air'' but that's bout it. very few headphones are even close to being flat in the top-end and past air frequencies. it's a rarity.bottom line don't trust these test tones and get your hearing check the right way is all i'm saying.


 


Edited by Mischa23v - 1/16/12 at 3:07am
post #49 of 543
so, that's marketing. the sony sa5000 i have with me i'm trying out says it can go up to 100khz in frequency range. can it though in reality? probably not. it's marketing specs,nothing else.
post #50 of 543
Thread Starter 

Not in US, you can actually sue them for that. But I’m sure the false advertising  is a conspiracy devised by  aliens, so they can communicate freely on frequencies over 20khz and they don’t have to worry about noisy humans.

 


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by RexAeterna View Post

so, that's marketing. the sony sa5000 i have with me i'm trying out says it can go up to 100khz in frequency range. can it though in reality? probably not. it's marketing specs,nothing else.


 


Edited by Mischa23v - 1/16/12 at 4:27am
post #51 of 543
Quote:
Originally Posted by RexAeterna View Post

so, that's marketing. the sony sa5000 i have with me i'm trying out says it can go up to 100khz in frequency range. can it though in reality? probably not. it's marketing specs,nothing else.


They do not say how much a 100 kHz tone is actually attenuated compared to 1 kHz, that is why specs like this are useless. Strictly speaking, the spec could be "true" in the sense that with very sensitive instruments in an anechoic chamber it might be proven that the SA5000 reproduces some audio at 100 kHz, it is just at an extremely low level.

 

post #52 of 543
i didn't say it was not true did i now? nope. i said probably not. i know specs are useless. that's why i mentioned it. it still doesn't show that most headphones in real world measurements actually measure flat up to 20khz do it? cause most headphones are measured in diffused-field and purposely rolled-off after 10khz.you'll have to have the volume insanely loud or your gear is simply producing audible harmonic distortion to have frequencies above 20khz audible. also could mean the codecs in the browsers are too as well is all i'm saying.
post #53 of 543

Male-34

 

I can hear 17 and 18, nothing above that. 

post #54 of 543

Male - 19.

I can hear all the way to 20khz no problem. Had to turn the volume relatively high to be able to hear 21khz, and then I could hear 22khz even on low volume.

Using Audio-Technica M50s

post #55 of 543

Male, 20 years.

40Hz to 16kHz. I'm not in a very good place to test, though, there's a lot of background noise going on right now.

post #56 of 543

--just to remember to take this when I get home tonight.

post #57 of 543

17-18kHz depending on test, not sure if the websites have it wrong or something. Not sure if it's due to genetics or if my many concerts or my loud music is the reason, probably a mix of both.

post #58 of 543

15k was the highest I could hear on the mosquito website. Tinnitus does a very good job of blending in with the highest highs.

post #59 of 543

Male, 23, 19 kHz. 

Don't know if that's normal, my music still sounds good and that's all I care about biggrin.gif

I do know, however, that I've been to a lot of heavy metal concerts in my teenage years, with no hearing protection and getting that "buzzing in ears" the next day(s). I started using earplugs only a few years ago...

 

ps. I used Sinegen > DAC-WOW-usb > Corda JAZZ > DT990/600.

post #60 of 543

Earlier in my longer post I said the average highest hearable frequency for an adult (starting from 18 years old) was 12 kHz. This is an average value that was measured by audiologists on a randomized population and compiled for a study paper I have once read in my class. Audiology isn't interested in the highest hearable frequencies usually but this was a special case... and I do remember having read this fact, three years ago in my class.


All that I am saying is that the 20 kHz on mosquitos ringtones, on YouTube, and in an audiological cabin are all different frequencies. Which one is the right 20 kHz? I believe it would the one you hear using the red and blue Sennheiser headphone at an audiology clinic when you do a hearing evaluation, you just ask the audiologist to go beyond 8 kHz, he shouldn't matter doing it but he'll warn you that you might not hear anything above 12 kHz. I asked my friend to do it when he evaluated me for his homework; the cabins are brand new and impressive, just like the classrooms. I'll see if I can find back my audiogram that he produced of my audition; it was above average for the 125 to 8000 band.

The numbers on YouTube and especially on MosquitosRingtones are inflated and distorted. 21 and 22 kHz must be arround 13 to 14 kHz, not more.

You're are right about the fact most of my class was hearing the 20 kHz; but that was the MosquitosRingtones 20 kHz, so maybe it's not 20 kHz.

Only newborn infant can hear the 20 kHz ultrasound... at 15 years old you're at about 15 kHz, and at 12 kHz, when 18 years old. It is the point when you're considered fully grown for the most part and your skull has fully ossificated and hardened. Also keep in mind that those are mean numbers. Someone healthy who doesn't listen to loud music, work in noisy environnements or often go to concerts, might be able to hear a bit to a lot more than those freqs.

 

I am also of the ones who believe that depending on the time of the day (after a good night of sleep), on your focus (destressing the middle ear's muscles to lower the compliance of your tympanic membrane and reduce the self-induced tinnitus (which is the tiny and very real noise that is emitted from your eardrums after you've been exposed to a noisy environment, a very physical and tangible form of tinnitus that one of my teacher claim to be able to hear coming from her patient's ear in a fully dampened acoustical chamber), your alimentation (there are pseudo-scientifical evidence that juice full of anti-oxidants such as grape, blueberry and pomegranate can help preserve your audition when aging) (but overall eating varied vegetables and fruits is always a plus), you can hear higher freqs.

Quote:

Originally Posted by Mischa23v

Your contradicting yourself ,” the big majority of the class at 20 kHz, there were four girl's hands remaining at 21 kHz, and only the very youngest of our class could hear the 22 kHz one, she was also 18 about to turn 19.”

 

 

 

 

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