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Poll: Can you hear sound over 20kHz? - Page 29

Poll Results: Can you hear sound over 20kHz?

 
  • 23% (100)
    Yes
  • 76% (323)
    No
423 Total Votes  
post #421 of 543
Quote:
Originally Posted by TLC View Post

As a physicist, I would like to continue my earlier comment by stating that uncontrolled tests with equipment of unknown characteristics may be leading many people to think they have hearing that extends into the inaudible.  This is bad science.  There is the burden of proof using real lab gear, and that, as far as I can tell, has not been demonstrated on this forum.  The physics of hearing and sound can't be fooled.  Regarding my one student who claimed hearing just over 20K, age and gender may allow it, but I did not have a chance to verify the physics of what was happening to my satisfaction.  There was some research way back about defeating the low pass filter of the middle ear by using bone conduction, however, I was never able to test this with my students.  Put a 19KHz ultrasonic transducer on the skull - see if there is a difference in perception.  There was a limit to what I was willing to send through students without signed releases.  Oddly, the lab had an x-ray tube from around 1960, and the included experiment was to allow students to view hand bones using the included fluoroscope.  How times change...soon all actual experiments will be eliminated as being too scary, and far fewer kids will ever develop an interest in science.  Kids need to touch the real thing.  I remember my first time alone with an electron microscope - didn't come out for days, changed my life.

 

Anyway, using uncalibrated computer tone generators through low-bidder (even what we consider high-end) sound cards into unknown output electronics into transducers of dubious pedigree needs to be replaced with lab-quality, calibrated function generators and transducers.  For those who have never used such equipment, I can assure you that there is a difference.  Calibration is a key to getting this verified.  Also, it is very easy to verify what was said above about energies and frequencies - just get two generators, a scope, and minimal components.  Mix, watch.  Oh, as long as you have two frequency sources, put one to X and one to Y on the scope and watch the lissajous patterns for hours.  Mix in other waveforms (triangle, square) for hypnotic patterns.  Hours of fun for those of us who dislike everything about computer games.  I will post a few pics if I get a chance to set it all up on a bench.  For anyone who wants to see a video of a sound experiment lead by one of the coolest physicists ever, google the TED talk by Cliff Stoll.  You'll enjoy his talk, and you can do it at home.  Experiment - enjoy!

 

Thank you.  That's what I was saying a little back.  Good luck with our "consumer grade" hi-fi equipment being accurate enough.  Even if everything you own is lab quality, 95% of IEMs drop incredibly fast after 10-15khz.  So no matter how good your equipment is, it is only as good as the weakest link.

post #422 of 543
Quote:
Originally Posted by TLC View Post
Anyway, using uncalibrated computer tone generators through low-bidder (even what we consider high-end) sound cards into unknown output electronics into transducers of dubious pedigree needs to be replaced with lab-quality, calibrated function generators and transducers.  For those who have never used such equipment, I can assure you that there is a difference.  Calibration is a key to getting this verified.

 

Although the level of the tones cannot be known exactly without having the right equipment, the frequency accuracy is not an issue (except perhaps with buggy software). Sound cards can also easily be good enough for this purpose, especially at 96 kHz sample rate. The main source of problems is buggy or incorrectly used software (aliasing due to poor sample rate conversion etc.), and the transducer producing sound at an unknown level and usually with poor frequency response above 5 kHz. However, human hearing drops off very steeply at its upper end, so large changes in level are needed for small changes in the highest audible frequency.


Edited by stv014 - 2/4/13 at 1:56am
post #423 of 543

ok, 28 can hear up to 18KHZ.

post #424 of 543
Quote:
Originally Posted by ev13wt View Post

my hearing drops off fast after 17. Im 35.

If I crank it up i can hear 19. I now know my very slight tinnitus sits somewhere around 17.5 to 18.5 frown.gif


Many automatic sliding doors seem to have a very high pitched sound to them. Don't know what this is, but I hear this and it hurts my head. Its very noticeable. Anyone else hear this?


No, but I used to be able to hear CRT TV's. Not sure if I can anymore as my house has gone all LCD/Plasma.

Not sure what frequency they used to be but they were pretty high pitched sounds.

 

I need to do a proper test. I know I can hear around 16-17,000hz and I'm 25 now.

I can't hear much more than that.

 

Most setups as I've said previously only really allow 20hz-20khz. A lot of headphones are rated higher than this though, but it depends on the output.


Edited by musical-kage - 2/4/13 at 5:46am
post #425 of 543
Quote:
Originally Posted by musical-kage View Post


No, but I used to be able to hear CRT TV's. Not sure if I can anymore as my house has gone all LCD/Plasma.

Not sure what frequency they used to be but they were pretty high pitched sounds.

 

It is most likely the horizontal frequency (15625 or 15734 Hz for PAL or NTSC, respectively).

post #426 of 543
Quote:
Originally Posted by stv014 View Post

 

It is most likely the horizontal frequency (15625 or 15734 Hz for PAL or NTSC, respectively).

Probably the case yeah, thanks.

No wonder that my mum at 40 can hear those too.

 

Just did a test in Audacity, by pumping a sine wave through at frequencies.

 

Through my Logitech Z-5500's going through Optical line out, I can hear 16,900hz perfectly...

17,000hz however, I can hear to begin with, but then it quietens down. Why?

 

If I move my head, the sound comes back again. Thats odd that.

 

As I kept going up, at least through these speakers, my limit is around 17,400hz,

 

My sub can only accurately portray 45hz and above, so at 30-40, even though I could hear a sound, I doubt it was accurate. At 20hz, the sub produces hardly any noise at all.


Edited by musical-kage - 2/4/13 at 5:58am
post #427 of 543
Quote:
Originally Posted by musical-kage View Post


No, but I used to be able to hear CRT TV's. Not sure if I can anymore as my house has gone all LCD/Plasma.

Not sure what frequency they used to be but they were pretty high pitched sounds.

 

I need to do a proper test. I know I can hear around 16-17,000hz and I'm 25 now.

I can't hear much more than that.

 

Most setups as I've said previously only really allow 20hz-20khz. A lot of headphones are rated higher than this though, but it depends on the output.

 
I hear my plasma. lol.  Seriously.  It's obviously not the same reason you hear the tube, but my plasma makes some high pitched noise that no one else hears, but I hear it.  I thought it was a fan bearing or something maybe, but it's far to continuous and the fan isn't always on, but the noise is.
post #428 of 543

I'm 21, and can hear up to about 19.5kHz. Honestly, I kinda find it annoying, I can hear some power outlets when things are plugged into them.

post #429 of 543

My dad is 57 now and can hear up to 15,000 hz. He has tinnitus though too. 

 

To be honest though. Anything past a certain point is just a high pitched whistle you can feel. Not really much use in my opinion

post #430 of 543

I can hear up to 16khz in my right ear; 14 khz in my left. I'm 26.

 

I suspect ear infections are the cause of the hearing loss in my left ear.

post #431 of 543
Quote:
Originally Posted by luisdent View Post
 


The Plasmas at work would make this weird noise as well. I could always tell when they were on. No one else really paid it any mind though. I also noticed they would burn out a lot. Really a waste of money IMO.

post #432 of 543

With the test, I can only really hear 18 kHz and 19 I can sorta feel but not hear.  I am 23 but I hear all sorts of random, high pitched electrical noises in the house.  I wonder what frequency those noises are at? 

post #433 of 543

Most likely (far) below 18 kHz.

post #434 of 543

What equipment etc works at 18KHZ? out of curiosity.

post #435 of 543

we used to play this game in my SAE class called Guess That Frequency, chessy stuff but most of the class could hear up to 17-18khz, some could hear 19khz (myself included) and one person could hear 20khz. In reply to someone who earlier said these frequencies don't seem to do anything; I was cleaning up a recording recently that had an annoying 12khz and upwards hiss, so I used a low pass filter to knock of most of those high frequencies. Interestingly the human voice was what suffered most and I spent a lot of time trying to return some of the air to the voice without returning too much hiss, I had to tinker with those top frequencies to do this.  

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