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Poll: Can you hear sound over 20kHz? - Page 21

Poll Results: Can you hear sound over 20kHz?

 
  • 23% (100)
    Yes
  • 76% (321)
    No
421 Total Votes  
post #301 of 543

I do hear high tones with the same volume I use to listen to music.

post #302 of 543

I can hear over 50khz !!! I am a doberman what do you expect ? wink_face.gif

post #303 of 543
Quote:
Originally Posted by lee730 View Post


Well we all have the right to our own opinion. I can tell the difference between feeling and hearing. I'm not deaf ;). Plus there's nothing new with people having better hearing than others. Same applies to vision.


No you don't, this is the sound-SCIENCE forum !

'Opinion' doesn't count around here !!

 

None of you guys can hear 20Khz + , you are all just hearing 'something' , like the noise of your computers fans ..

post #304 of 543
Quote:
Originally Posted by AKG240mkII View Post


No you don't, this is the sound-SCIENCE forum !

'Opinion' doesn't count around here !!

 

None of you guys can hear 20Khz + , you are all just hearing 'something' , like the noise of your computers fans ..


No it sounds like you are just envious because you can't hear that high. Not my problem and NO I wasn't hearing my computer fan or whatever excuse you wanna come up with. I was using my DACport LX connected to my UHA6 MKII to do this test and I heard all the way up there. There is no background noise being induced through my UHA6 MKII, it's a black background. wink_face.gif

post #305 of 543
Even if you can't hear an ultra high frequency, you can feel the sound pressure. That doesn't count as "hearing".

One shouldn't be proud of hearing ultra high frequencies. All there is to hear up there is squeals from the ballasts of flourescent lights and computer monitors. You're better off not hearing it.
post #306 of 543

I love how somebody without your ears can tell you what you can't or can hear. This test is fun but really not very meaningful. Not much going on in recorded material including harmonics above 16k or so. Youth and not being subject to constant and loud noise will rule this test.

post #307 of 543
Quote:
Originally Posted by bigshot View Post

Even if you can't hear an ultra high frequency, you can feel the sound pressure. That doesn't count as "hearing".
One shouldn't be proud of hearing ultra high frequencies. All there is to hear up there is squeals from the ballasts of flourescent lights and computer monitors. You're better off not hearing it.


I know the difference between feeling an hearing. As I said earlier I am not deaf. Plus I don't think it's really bad to be able to hear high up top. One thing about it though is the sensitivity to high frequencies which can be annoying, I agree. I tend to listen at lower volumes than normal due to this. But in a sense it's also good as it will help to preserve my hearing at least until age sets in.


Edited by lee730 - 9/27/12 at 4:27pm
post #308 of 543
Quote:
Originally Posted by bigshot View Post

Even if you can't hear an ultra high frequency, you can feel the sound pressure. That doesn't count as "hearing".
One shouldn't be proud of hearing ultra high frequencies. All there is to hear up there is squeals from the ballasts of flourescent lights and computer monitors. You're better off not hearing it.

I can't get up there any more but I sure wouldn't mind. What does pride have to do with participating and answering? If someone wants to test themselves more accurately. Have another play various frequencies for you without you watching and indicate to them when you can hear something. They'll know if it corresponds to them initiating a tone.


Edited by goodvibes - 9/27/12 at 4:37pm
post #309 of 543
Quote:
Originally Posted by lee730 View Post

I know the difference between feeling an hearing.

 

At the very edge of perception the line blurs. The difference between 18kHz and 20kHz is very small. The difference between 20kHz and 22kHz is even smaller. When you get up in this range, you're splitting hairs. The next octave up from 20kHz is 40kHz. I'm sure no one is getting anywhere close to that.

 

Being able to hear all the way up to 20kHz isn't going to make music sound any better than being able to hear up to 15kHz. The difference between the two is just two notes on a musical scale. It doesn't matter.

post #310 of 543
Quote:
Originally Posted by bigshot View Post

 

At the very edge of perception the line blurs. The difference between 18kHz and 20kHz is very small. The difference between 20kHz and 22kHz is even smaller. When you get up in this range, you're splitting hairs. The next octave up from 20kHz is 40kHz. I'm sure no one is getting anywhere close to that.

 

Being able to hear all the way up to 20kHz isn't going to make music sound any better than being able to hear up to 15kHz. The difference between the two is just two notes on a musical scale. It doesn't matter.


If it doesn't matter then why are you contesting that others can hear up in this region? wink_face.gif

 

In the end this was just a test to test the limits our our hearing. Nothing more, nothing less.

post #311 of 543

Some people seem to think that hearing above the range of human hearing is an advantage. As you say, it isn't.

post #312 of 543
Quote:
Originally Posted by bigshot View Post

Some people seem to think that hearing above the range of human hearing is an advantage. As you say, it isn't.


Well I don't find it not to be an advantage. How I take it is as you move up it does get harder to hear yes. But that sensitivity alone also applies to the lower frequencies. Meaning I'll listen at a lower volume naturally.

post #313 of 543
Quote:
Originally Posted by bigshot View Post

Some people seem to think that hearing above the range of human hearing is an advantage. As you say, it isn't.

The value of being able to hear high frequencies is analog to climbing a tree, you don't need it (most cases), but it is reassuring to know you have the capability to do so (Because it implies you've taken care of yourself).

post #314 of 543

Well there can be advantages to being able to hear if you left any electronics on in different rooms as you're leaving the house.

post #315 of 543
Quote:
Originally Posted by DarkSleip View Post

The value of being able to hear high frequencies is analog to climbing a tree, you don't need it (most cases), but it is reassuring to know you have the capability to do so (Because it implies you've taken care of yourself).


I feel the fact that I can hear up that high correlates to my hearing down lower. At least from what I've experienced it is much harder to hear up that high and hearing lower is actually much easier. So my sensitivity is even more so focused on the lower frequencies. Another reason why I tend to listen at lower volumes. I mean I love to pump it up at times but that gets tiring very fast and I'll turn it down for the sake of my hearing.

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