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Poll: Can you hear sound over 20kHz? - Page 20

Poll Results: Can you hear sound over 20kHz?

 
  • 23% (101)
    Yes
  • 76% (323)
    No
424 Total Votes  
post #286 of 543
Quote:

Originally Posted by machoboy View Post

 

There's just a complete hole from 17k through just below 21 then it comes back for 1000hz clear as a bell, very strange.

 

Do you also hear it at different sample rates, like 48 and 96 kHz ? It could be intermodulation distortion with the ultrasonic mirror frequency as you approach half the sample rate.


Edited by stv014 - 9/12/12 at 4:09am
post #287 of 543
Quote:
Originally Posted by machoboy View Post

After more sine tones and sweeps, I can hear down to 1 hz but only up to 17 khz...

 

At very low frequencies and high volume, you may just hear distortion from the drivers.

post #288 of 543
Quote:
Originally Posted by bigshot View Post

There have been studies where they rolled off upper frequencies in music and polled listeners to find out 1) if they could tell the frequencies were missing, and 2) if it made a difference to the music. The results were that although listeners could tell if everything above 10kHz was rolled off, but they said it didn't affect sound quality. Above 14kHz, they couldn't tell at all.
The frequency range is not an even scale. It doubles with each octave. So the difference between 20Hz and 40Hz is exactly the same as the difference between 10,000 Hz and 20,000 Hz. When you are talking about the difference between 20kHz and 21.5 kHz, you are talking about a single note's difference on a piano. 15kHz to 20kHz is four notes.
If you are "feeling" a high frequency note by turning up the volume, you aren't necessarily *hearing* that note. Everyone can feel sound pressure from inaudible frequencies if they're loud enough.
The middle of the frequency range is what matters. Don't worry about the stuff only bats can hear.

 

Seems like what people say if they can't hear to 20 kHz and beyond.  Sour grapes.  biggrin.gif

 

Nah, I'm pretty sure part of my top-octave hearing has been absent since I was a kid, since I remember having to go to an audiologist after the test at the pediatrician's office came up unusual.  I don't really remember, and it's not like they told me the details.  Now I can't hear much past 12 kHz clearly, but I'm not sure if the range is less or the same as it used to be.

 

Maybe to compensate, I have decent absolute ("perfect") pitch in the range remaining, though...

post #289 of 543

Whats so nice about frequency extension if you ain't pitch perfect? :) 

post #290 of 543

I think the point it to test how high up you can hear (especially regarding the supposed 20khz limit to human hearing).
 

post #291 of 543
I don't think people here actually hear that high. I think they're turning up the volume until they feel the sound pressure. That isn't hearing.
post #292 of 543
Quote:
Originally Posted by bigshot View Post

I don't think people here actually hear that high. I think they're turning up the volume until they feel the sound pressure. That isn't hearing.


Well we all have the right to our own opinion. I can tell the difference between feeling and hearing. I'm not deaf ;). Plus there's nothing new with people having better hearing than others. Same applies to vision.

post #293 of 543
Quote:
Originally Posted by bigshot View Post

I don't think people here actually hear that high. I think they're turning up the volume until they feel the sound pressure. That isn't hearing.

If this feeling is transmitted by the auditory nerve, then it is hearing.

Maybe the poll should be revised to include a specific volume threshold.
post #294 of 543
Sound pressure isn't transmitted by the auditory nerve. It is physical pressure on the inner ear.
post #295 of 543
Quote:
Originally Posted by anetode View Post


If this feeling is transmitted by the auditory nerve, then it is hearing.
Maybe the poll should be revised to include a specific volume threshold.


The point is, your hearing is going to start rolling off in the high treble. Probably well before 20kHz. It's not like a hard cut-off, so by turning up the volume, yes you can hear higher and higher.

post #296 of 543
Quote:
Originally Posted by bigshot View Post

Sound pressure isn't transmitted by the auditory nerve. It is physical pressure on the inner ear.

I didn't say it was.
Quote:
Originally Posted by OJNeg View Post


The point is, your hearing is going to start rolling off in the high treble. Probably well before 20kHz. It's not like a hard cut-off, so by turning up the volume, yes you can hear higher and higher.

Yup, familiar with the curve.
post #297 of 543

Using my iPhone 4 along with my GR01's and a tone generator app i can hear from about 22hz to about 18khz. This is with the volume set to the half way mark for the whole test. Im sure if i turned the volume up i could hear a tad lower and maybe a tad higher, and this of course also shows the frequency response of the GR01 as well.  Also im 27 and i think i have been pretty good to my ears, nothing to loud for to long, and i wear ear plugs when i cut the lawn and do other loud things.

post #298 of 543

This test is highly dependent on the the frequency response of your output device

post #299 of 543

Bumping a little late in this thread. To answer the original question, please check the following blind test. It uses wide band noises and takes the masking effect into account :

 

http://www.audiocheck.net/blindtests_frequency.php

 

Alternatively, there is a sweep tone test here. Beware, this one is sensitive to you sound card aliasing :

 

http://www.audiocheck.net/audiotests_frequencycheckhigh.php

post #300 of 543
Quote:
Originally Posted by Head Injury View Post

It would be better to use a sine generator, I think. Some of these tests don't work as claimed, or have distortion or artifacts that can ruin the results. With a sine generator you know you're getting the frequency that's advertised, they're designed for testing.

 

I have this and can hear up to 17.5 kHz , male age 22.

 

You are not legally deaf at 16 kHz. Where is your source for that? 16 kHz+ holds very little meaningful sound, and is completely useless for communication which I think would define legal deafness.

Using Head's sine generator I was able to hear up to 17.1 kHz, male age 31

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