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Poll: Can you hear sound over 20kHz? - Page 2

Poll Results: Can you hear sound over 20kHz?

 
  • 23% (100)
    Yes
  • 76% (321)
    No
421 Total Votes  
post #16 of 543
Thread Starter 


 

Also, it's very weird that you can only hear up to 16kHz. that would put you in legally deaf range.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by TiEx View Post

This is so funny. Male, age 23. By these mosquito tones I can hear all the way up to 22kHz. But when I start Adobe Audition and generate sweep tone 20 to 22 khz in 32/96 mode I can only hear up to 16kHz. that means this test is horse ... well you know what. Of course lower registers doesn't matter because ppl till old age are able to hear bass. You can say that my rig and headphones are crap an you will be damn right, but still. I think you can measure your hearing only with precise signal generator and reference quality rig and HP or specialized equipment, good luck!



 

post #17 of 543

Male, 19.

 

I can't hear 20 Hz unless I use more than my usual listening volume. So I'd say 30 Hz to 17 Khz

post #18 of 543

It would be better to use a sine generator, I think. Some of these tests don't work as claimed, or have distortion or artifacts that can ruin the results. With a sine generator you know you're getting the frequency that's advertised, they're designed for testing.

 

I have this and can hear up to 17.5 kHz , male age 22.

 

You are not legally deaf at 16 kHz. Where is your source for that? 16 kHz+ holds very little meaningful sound, and is completely useless for communication which I think would define legal deafness.

post #19 of 543

I did the utube test to on that one could not ear anything past 12 khz which is the good test !

post #20 of 543
Thread Starter 


what if it's so annoying and loud that you had to turn volume down because person next to you couldn't hear it and was turning volume up. I even had to point speakers away from me.
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by hulawafu77 View Post

Since this is a science forum, this test to test your hearing is hogwash.  You hear what your eyes tell your brain what you are hearing.

 

The only way to do this to convince me at least was if you were alone and told to raise your hand whenever you heard 22khz.  No one ever tells you if you were correct or not until the test is over.  Meaning for say a period of 2 minutes, the 22khz is played randomnly.  Only then can you actually say you can hear 22khz, at least for me.  Since 22khz really is beyond the hearing capability for pretty much anyone who is 26 years old...



 

post #21 of 543
Quote:
Originally Posted by Head Injury View Post

It would be better to use a sine generator, I think. Some of these tests don't work as claimed, or have distortion or artifacts that can ruin the results. With a sine generator you know you're getting the frequency that's advertised, they're designed for testing.

 

I have this and can hear up to 17.5 kHz , male age 22.

 

You are not legally deaf at 16 kHz. Where is your source for that? 16 kHz+ holds very little meaningful sound, and is completely useless for communication which I think would define legal deafness.



Bingo, I have a different sine generating program but pretty much the same result whether using my monitors or headphones - about 17~k. (Male, 25)

post #22 of 543
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mischa23v View Post


hmm interesting, try youtube video? do you get same results.
 



 



Same 16kHz from youtube in 720p.

post #23 of 543
Quote:
Originally Posted by ivantoar View Post
I can't hear 20 Hz unless I use more than my usual listening volume. So I'd say 30 Hz to 17 Khz


That is probably more of a limitation of the equipment you use, very low frequency sounds are hard to reproduce without distortion. With a headphone that has good bass extension, it is possible to hear 20 Hz (not just the THD products), and maybe up to a few Hz below that, depending on the volume.

Since there is no standard on the gear and SPL used for the high frequency testing, it is not accurately comparable either, although at the end of its upper range human hearing tends to drop off rather steeply.

 

post #24 of 543

I can't even hear 14-15 KHz that easily, and anything higher is only silence.

 

I'm only 21. I hate loud noises, such that I try to distance myself from certain events where ear-blowing volume is the norm. This still happened somehow, even leaving me with a subtle case of tinnitus that's thankfully easy to ignore with all but the faintest sounds around.

 

Needless to say, I'm not very happy about it.

post #25 of 543
Quote:
Originally Posted by Head Injury View Post

It would be better to use a sine generator, I think. Some of these tests don't work as claimed, or have distortion or artifacts that can ruin the results. With a sine generator you know you're getting the frequency that's advertised, they're designed for testing.

 

I have this and can hear up to 17.5 kHz , male age 22.

 

You are not legally deaf at 16 kHz. Where is your source for that? 16 kHz+ holds very little meaningful sound, and is completely useless for communication which I think would define legal deafness.


 

Tried the software. I can hear from 10 Hz to 17 kHz. From 17 kHz upwards, I can only the first few seconds that the sound just disappeared. Is it supposed to be that way?

 

My ears are ringing for a short while after I take this test -__-

 


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by stv014 View Post


That is probably more of a limitation of the equipment you use, very low frequency sounds are hard to reproduce without distortion. With a headphone that has good bass extension, it is possible to hear 20 Hz (not just the THD products), and maybe up to a few Hz below that, depending on the volume.

Since there is no standard on the gear and SPL used for the high frequency testing, it is not accurately comparable either, although at the end of its upper range human hearing tends to drop off rather steeply.

 



Ah maybe.. I used Superlux HD668b with Fiio E9 to perform this test. I don't have any better equipment than these two.


Edited by ivantoar - 1/15/12 at 10:43am
post #26 of 543
Thread Starter 


I checked online and here's what I came up with:

 

Thresholds ranging from 25 to 40 dB HL are considered mild hearing loss, and ... exceeding 90 dB HL across frequency are considered legally deaf. <4000Hz

Quote:
Originally Posted by hulawafu77 View Post

Just guess here, but I think majority of my music is between 100hz and 10khz, nowhere close to 16khz.  So I highly doubt 16khz is being legally deaf.



 


Edited by Mischa23v - 1/15/12 at 11:00am
post #27 of 543
Thread Starter 

using  adobe audition, I still get same results. 20hz - 22khz. but not as loud as before.

post #28 of 543

Male, 19, 20khz if I really crank up the volume, 18khz on regular listening level.

post #29 of 543
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mischa23v View Post

using  adobe audition, I still get same results. 20hz - 22khz. but not as loud as before.



Can you name your rig components please

post #30 of 543

Well i'm 49 and spent 15 years playing guitar in a rock band and my audible range according to the youtube test is - 70hz - 15khz...!

 

So I guess its not worth me spending too much money on a new LOD...frown.gif


Edited by Thing Fish - 1/15/12 at 1:35pm
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