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How do you know what Frenquency range an instrument is in?

post #1 of 8
Thread Starter 

 

Hi all,

 

I was wondering if anyone has any information on how to find out which ranges certain instruments lie in?

 

The reason I ask is that I spent a bit of time the other day swapping between my ACS T1s and JH13 with a particular song and noticed an obvious difference in how the bass sounded. This got me thinking, how do I accurately describe the difference I am hearing? In what part of the bass is the difference I am hearing?

 

Is there any information out there that shows in which frequency range certain instruments lie in?


On this site, I've often seen people talking about how you can hear a difference at a particular frequency - how do you know which range\frequency you are hearing the differences\bump in?

 

Is there any software that produces tones at particular frenquencies that would help to accurately describe the sound reproduction with different IEMs?

 

With headphones it seems fairly straightforward to create a freqency chart with a dummy's head and clever electronics. However, custom IEMs rely on the listener to accurately describe what they are hearing. I want to be as accurate as possible.

 

Any ideas\suggestions appreciated

post #2 of 8

http://www.independentrecording.net/irn/resources/freqchart/main_display.htm

 

I think this is slightly off - but it does give a pretty good general idea. 


Edited by liamstrain - 1/11/12 at 2:16am
post #3 of 8
Thread Starter 

Thats great liamstrain.

 

I've also just stumbled across something that will help. I've just run up foobar to listen to a track (dont normally use foobar) and it has a Spectrum. I think the spectrum plus the chart in your link, will give me a good indication of what I am hearing and how to better describe it.

Thanks

 

post #4 of 8

Most "instrument frequency range" charts I see are totally off the mark. The best way to do this is with an FFT of an actual recording. For example, the characteristic sound of a clarinet is due to its strong odd-numbered harmonics. This clarinet note is D above middle C (293.7 Hz), and I used the FFT feature in Sound Forge to make this graph:

 

clarinet_fft.gif

 

--Ethan

post #5 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by liamstrain View Post

http://www.independentrecording.net/irn/resources/freqchart/main_display.htm

 

I think this is slightly off - but it does give a pretty good general idea. 


That ones pretty good.....and it can give a clue into why an accurate speaker system can be difficult to design and a relatively cheap headphone can sound great.....no crossover points since we're using one full range driver for each channel.

 

You just need to make sure that one driver is of very high quality.

 

post #6 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by liamstrain View Post

http://www.independentrecording.net/irn/resources/freqchart/main_display.htm

 

I think this is slightly off - but it does give a pretty good general idea. 



That's a very informative graph. They only refer to actual instruments though. A lot of genres nowadays, especially pop, use synthesised sounds. How would we be able to determine the frequencies? I'm messing around with EQ on my sansa clip to try and make my music sound how it should (or how I think it should). Knowing the actual frequencies would be a huge help.

post #7 of 8
I think this is a good reference: http://www.listenhear.co.uk/general_acoustics.htm


Sent from my ADR6400L using Tapatalk
Edited by skeptic - 1/13/12 at 4:14pm
post #8 of 8
Thread Starter 

Lots of useful resources - thanks guys

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