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Sony MDR-V6 (and family) Impressions Thread - Page 3

post #31 of 361
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kodhifi View Post

I'll let you know how the velour pads sound as soon as I can find a pair in stock that aren't at rip off prices. I refuse to pay more for DT250 velour pads than I pay for DT880 Velour pads. It's just ridiculous to pay $45 for a product that Amazon sells for $30, now if Amazon could just get them back in stock.....they cancelled my last order after 4 days because they couldn't get them in stock.
 

Please let me know how it works out. I just replaced my pads and restored my Sony MDR-7506 sound to new and they are sounding better than ever. Although I find the pads comfortable, they feel very thin and fragile. I know it will be only a year or so before I have to replace them again. I heard that the velour alters the sound, muffles the sound a bit. IMO, the crisp and clear sound is the strength of V6/MDR-7506

post #32 of 361
Quote:
Originally Posted by AzraelDarkangel View Post

Most people say that the Beyer pads ruin the sound of the CD900ST but someone suggested the Pearstone Deluxe which look lot like the Beyer pads but I haven't seen either in person. Anyone know anything about the Pearstone Deluxe?

I've done both the Beyers and the Pearstones.  The Pearstones are much better, easily available and cheaper.  They're specifically made for the Sony V6's:

http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/645787-REG/Pearstone_9081860_Deluxe_Earpads_Pair.html

 

Beyer's are a tad larger and the chances are greater that it alters the sound of the headphone.  Plus, when I bought them they didn't have the foam liner and I had to cut up the Sony originals to prevent the bare driver from making contact with my ears.

 

I've had the V6's for many years, but would never use them with the Sony pads - the flaking is pretty bad.  I understand from BHPhoto and others that radio/tv studios order them by the boxload, along with the Pearstone velours and replace the pads as soon as they pull them out of the boxes.

post #33 of 361
I don't know where to ask it, so i do it here.
My new mdr-v6 were delivered today, but unfortunately there was a screw missing in one of the connections.
Do you guys know what kind of screws are in the v6 , and where to buy them.
post #34 of 361

I hope they are legit, I don't think a missing screw would pass Sony QC.

post #35 of 361

i gotta say i love my V6..

i use them for recording and listening sometimes.

post #36 of 361

The problem I have with the V6 is its near perfectness. I love the lows, the mids are crazy detailed and the highs go all the way up with bright sparkle. I know they have a little siblence on certain tracks but the sound overall is very high quality.

 

I honestly think the V6 kills any if not all other new current headphones by Sony.

 

I bought a pair for my brother this Christmas that is how good they are, I want everyone to atleast experience them once.

 

What would be amazing, swapping a pair of V6 drivers into the MDR-1R shell.

post #37 of 361
How much do the pearsons alter the sound from the original?
Quote:
Originally Posted by tomb View Post

I've done both the Beyers and the Pearstones.  The Pearstones are much better, easily available and cheaper.  They're specifically made for the Sony V6's:
http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/645787-REG/Pearstone_9081860_Deluxe_Earpads_Pair.html

Beyer's are a tad larger and the chances are greater that it alters the sound of the headphone.  Plus, when I bought them they didn't have the foam liner and I had to cut up the Sony originals to prevent the bare driver from making contact with my ears.

I've had the V6's for many years, but would never use them with the Sony pads - the flaking is pretty bad.  I understand from BHPhoto and others that radio/tv studios order them by the boxload, along with the Pearstone velours and replace the pads as soon as they pull them out of the boxes.
post #38 of 361
Proud owner of a MDR-V7. I love these cans. I have mine modded for a removable cable. I really need new pads as there is no "leather" left on them at all. Anyone know if the beyer or pearstone velours increase isolation? That's really my only complaint, and its probably due to the beat pads
Well that and the price I got these for. $35 on ebay for a headphone that's a solid 15% better than the v6 at everything (from my listening tests) really skews ones idea of price/performance. Every time I give a listen to any sub $200 closed can I'm struck "yeah, that's pretty nice, buuuut..."
Edited by thoughtcriminal - 2/19/13 at 10:20pm
post #39 of 361
Quote:
Originally Posted by bachatum View Post

Please let me know how it works out. I just replaced my pads and restored my Sony MDR-7506 sound to new and they are sounding better than ever. Although I find the pads comfortable, they feel very thin and fragile. I know it will be only a year or so before I have to replace them again. I heard that the velour alters the sound, muffles the sound a bit. IMO, the crisp and clear sound is the strength of V6/MDR-7506


Still waiting, the other sellers are up to asking $60 for the 250 velour pads now, that's almost as much as the V6 costs! I don't think it's that uncommon to replace velour pads often. I listened to my 880's about 40-60 hours a week and replace the pads about every 6-9 months when they start getting thin. I wash them by hand every 2-3 months and that returns them to new condition. The foam eventually gets less full though and they start getting uncomfortable and that's when I replace them. At $30 a pop it's not that bad because it makes them as good as new again.

post #40 of 361
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kodhifi View Post


Still waiting, the other sellers are up to asking $60 for the 250 velour pads now, that's almost as much as the V6 costs! I don't think it's that uncommon to replace velour pads often. I listened to my 880's about 40-60 hours a week and replace the pads about every 6-9 months when they start getting thin. I wash them by hand every 2-3 months and that returns them to new condition. The foam eventually gets less full though and they start getting uncomfortable and that's when I replace them. At $30 a pop it's not that bad because it makes them as good as new again.


You have the 880's? how do you rate them against the V6's? are the mids recessed as are the DT-770s? Do they have the same clarity as the V6?

post #41 of 361
Quote:
Originally Posted by bachatum View Post


You have the 880's? how do you rate them against the V6's? are the mids recessed as are the DT-770s? Do they have the same clarity as the V6?


880 VS V6 is not a very fair comparison. One costs 3x as much as the other. It's like putting DJ Qualls in the ring with Mike Tyson.

 

DT770 is too colored for many people and is nothing like the 880 or 990.

 

The 880 blows the V6 out of the water. It's much flatter and more neutral, it has an incredible transparency, better highs, better mids, more natural and extended bass, and is more comfortable to wear. It also costs 3 times or more as much. The V6 is one of the best, if not THE best headphone for under $100. For the price they are simply phenominal, make the Grado SR60i's sound like stock apple earbuds by comparison.

 

But comparing them to the $300-$400 kind of quality, they have overly bumped upper bass/lower midrange, excessive and boomy bass, and highs that are veiled to non existant. Their frequency response curve is not even remotely flat etc.

 

What they do have going for them aside from price, are they are sensitive where as the 880 in 250ohm needs an amp to listen to classical or lower volume sources.

 

In spite of their short comings the V6 are reasonably transparent for their price and good enough for some studio and production work but mostly in live monitoring. I don't know that I would use them to master a song because of the bass hump and recessed highs. Any song I produced would likely sound like a tin can radio from the reduced bass and bumped treble to compensate for the V6 shortcomings.

post #42 of 361
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kodhifi View Post


880 VS V6 is not a very fair comparison. One costs 3x as much as the other. It's like putting DJ Qualls in the ring with Mike Tyson.

DT770 is too colored for many people and is nothing like the 880 or 990.

The 880 blows the V6 out of the water. It's much flatter and more neutral, it has an incredible transparency, better highs, better mids, more natural and extended bass, and is more comfortable to wear. It also costs 3 times or more as much. The V6 is one of the best, if not THE best headphone for under $100. For the price they are simply phenominal, make the Grado SR60i's sound like stock apple earbuds by comparison.

But comparing them to the $300-$400 kind of quality, they have overly bumped upper bass/lower midrange, excessive and boomy bass, and highs that are veiled to non existant. Their frequency response curve is not even remotely flat etc.

What they do have going for them aside from price, are they are sensitive where as the 880 in 250ohm needs an amp to listen to classical or lower volume sources.

In spite of their short comings the V6 are reasonably transparent for their price and good enough for some studio and production work but mostly in live monitoring. I don't know that I would use them to master a song because of the bass hump and recessed highs. Any song I produced would likely sound like a tin can radio from the reduced bass and bumped treble to compensate for the V6 shortcomings.

Their primary professional use and where they excel IMO is vocals. Their fr tilt is just right to bring both the female and male voice to the front and the (for the price mind you) brutal clarity makes it easy to hear the mistakes. You're the first person I've seen say the v6 has recessed highs. I've always heard them as a rather bright can.
post #43 of 361

He asked me to compare the V6 to the DT880's............

 

The V6 is used professionally for MONITORING work, not for mixing, mastering, effects, or any critical listening other than live monitoring.

 

The 880 is not marketed as a studio headphone but it does a better job of it than the V6 and when comparing the two to each other the V6 might as well not have any highs at all next to the 880's soaring clean sound.

 

Take a look at their frequency response and my observation holds up graphically. The V6 loses up to -25 db from 10khz to 20khz compared to the 880.

 

 

 

 

 

In practice I didn't find the V6 to sound nearly as veiled in the highs as the graph suggests, but compared to the DT880's highs, like I said its like throwing a 90lb weaking into the ring with a heavyweight boxer.


Edited by Kodhifi - 2/21/13 at 12:49pm
post #44 of 361

o well,, i use them for mixing.redface.gif

post #45 of 361

As long as you can calibrate your ear to the sound they put out so you aren't over compensating your mix to make up for the headphone then you can totally do that.

 

Nothing beats using studio monitor speakers for mixing work but in a pinch, if you know what you're doing you could use headphones. It's just not what professionals do.
 

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