Head-Fi.org › Forums › Equipment Forums › Gear-Fi: Non-Audio Gear and Gadgets › Linux users unite!
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Linux users unite! - Page 7

post #91 of 395
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dissonant View Post


It'll be hyped to hell and back for good reason - primarily consistency and beauty. But its not my cup of tea.. neither does it seem to be for some of us. Nevertheless, if they use a purpose-built kernel and start from scratch, to remove any conflict both in branding and in packages with Ubuntu, I may use it for convenience's sake. However, I look forward to playing with WMs again, once I get the guts to mess with Arch post-systemd. I can barely remember what packages I installed :P. Thank goodness for the fantastic documentation. The blocky *box aesthetic is now officially in vogue since the guys at Redmond adopted it for Metro! Though it really perplexes me why people are using PekWM so rarely. Its quite stable for me and can look better than Openbox. Its also in active development!

Thought Openbox and dmw were feature-complete at this point. They still get compatibility and bug fixes I think.
Quote:
Originally Posted by mosshorn View Post

Very true, it was just getting #! to look properly aesthetically that took a bit of work.
How so? Comes with a bunch of themes and stuff preconfigured. Though it is a hassle to grab some stuff without the AUR

Quote:
Originally Posted by proton007 View Post


Crunchbang is easier to install than Arch, because Arch has gone into pure command line install, which means the instructions need to be followed closely, and network needs to be ready before install.

There's always Archboot for the script inclined. Although I bet most of us can cook up a nice bash install script, setup up the network, and grab it from git/what have you. Barring the occasional esoteric piece of hardware, where some fiddling with mkinitcpio might be needed, most modern machines don't differ too much install-wise, it's the post-install process that can be bothersome.
post #92 of 395
Quote:
Originally Posted by TwinQY View Post


There's always Archboot for the script inclined. Although I bet most of us can cook up a nice bash install script, setup up the network, and grab it from git/what have you. Barring the occasional esoteric piece of hardware, where some fiddling with mkinitcpio might be needed, most modern machines don't differ too much install-wise, it's the post-install process that can be bothersome.

 

Yeah, and spend a couple of days compiling the system. biggrin.gif I tried it with LFS, it was a worthwhile experience, very educational, but not good in terms of repeatability, and maintainability.

post #93 of 395
Quote:
Originally Posted by proton007 View Post

Yeah, and spend a couple of days compiling the system. biggrin.gif I tried it with LFS, it was a worthwhile experience, very educational, but not good in terms of repeatability, and maintainability.

Compile time's always a good excuse for slacking off. Just leave it there so you won't be able to do any work with the machine for a while smily_headphones1.gif But seriously, people really need to start using surrogate machines for compiling for slow hardware (Anyone try to compile a 2.6 LTS kernel on a Pentium II? Takes days, literally)

Anyone willing to maintain their own LFS = Too much free time. Super fun to build though. Baremetal was really educational as well.
post #94 of 395
Quote:
Originally Posted by TwinQY View Post


Compile time's always a good excuse for slacking off. Just leave it there so you won't be able to do any work with the machine for a while smily_headphones1.gif But seriously, people really need to start using surrogate machines for compiling for slow hardware (Anyone try to compile a 2.6 LTS kernel on a Pentium II? Takes days, literally)
Anyone willing to maintain their own LFS = Too much free time. Super fun to build though. Baremetal was really educational as well.


I was planning on a Gentoo install once, and I found this equation online; 

 

t being time,

 

f[waste of time] → ( t[compile] - t[relevant learning curve] ) / t[performance gain between compile sessions];


if f > 1, then you've wasted your time.

post #95 of 395

Thread revival

Quote:
Originally Posted by proton007 View Post

I was planning on a Gentoo install once, and I found this equation online; 

 

t being time,

 

f[waste of time] → ( t[compile] - t[relevant learning curve] ) / t[performance gain between compile sessions];


if f > 1, then you've wasted your time.

LOL isn't that from Awebb?

 

 

Recently, I've been trying to compact my VMs, and through some strange twist of fate, managed to delete every other VM but the XP one. No snapshots, nothing like that. And I have a bad habit of not backing stuff up. But reinstalls are always a good learning opportunity, keeps me on the ball. And by chance I happen to find a new hardened uclibc profile for Gentoo (yes, it's been that long since I've reinstalled). Cool beans. So now I'm shuffling between alpine or Gentoo for my wall calendar/alarm project. Also found a snapped-in-half Libretto netbook, which I might just salvage the screen for. Now all I need are tiny speakers.

post #96 of 395

Anyone use Exherbo here? I think the reputation for it being completely inaccessible is a bit over the top. They even have an install guide (which is the typical install through chroot & livecd shebang that most don't need, but still a good gesture since it's sort of offical). I don't even develop for them and have been using it happily for a while now. Paludis and nothing but paludis as the package manager is great - it might possibly be one of the most powerful package managers on the face of this earth. And the package quality is top-notch as well. 

post #97 of 395
Quote:
Originally Posted by TwinQY View Post

Anyone use Exherbo here? I think the reputation for it being completely inaccessible is a bit over the top. They even have an install guide (which is the typical install through chroot & livecd shebang that most don't need, but still a good gesture since it's sort of offical). I don't even develop for them and have been using it happily for a while now. Paludis and nothing but paludis as the package manager is great - it might possibly be one of the most powerful package managers on the face of this earth. And the package quality is top-notch as well. 


I experienced the crude split of folks back then into Exherbo, after having quite an amount of other developers leave because of their behavior. Even though I'm not afraid of any trolling or harsh behavior (I'm a big fan of the suckless.org community after all), I stuck with Gentoo. I do have Exherbo on the list to try though, not sure if I'd ever make the switch, but I've got the idea they have quite some neat things they developed rolling out of their fingers, definitely worth a try and look at in the future when time allows :).

 

Is there anything like the hardened variant, GrSecurity patches, on Exherbo?

post #98 of 395
Quote:
Originally Posted by laen View Post

I experienced the crude split of folks back then into Exherbo, after having quite an amount of other developers leave because of their behavior. Even though I'm not afraid of any trolling or harsh behavior (I'm a big fan of the suckless.org community after all), I stuck with Gentoo. I do have Exherbo on the list to try though, not sure if I'd ever make the switch, but I've got the idea they have quite some neat things they developed rolling out of their fingers, definitely worth a try and look at in the future when time allows :).

 

Is there anything like the hardened variant, GrSecurity patches, on Exherbo?

Also a big suckless fan. Still waiting for sta.li to come out of planning. I think things have cooled down a lot since '09, quite amiable (to an extent, these are still Exherbo devs) on IRC. Structure and package quality, as mentioned, are immensely satisfying. 

 

No hardened kernels (the hardened-sources from gentoo might work, haven't tried), profiles, or otherwise. Will have to be built by hand. I used uclibc this time around, so didn't want to get into too much complexity and mess with hardened as well.

post #99 of 395
Quote:
Originally Posted by TwinQY View Post

Also a big suckless fan. Still waiting for sta.li to come out of planning. I think things have cooled down a lot since '09, quite amiable (to an extent, these are still Exherbo devs) on IRC. Structure and package quality, as mentioned, are immensely satisfying. 

 

No hardened kernels (the hardened-sources from gentoo might work, haven't tried), profiles, or otherwise. Will have to be built by hand. I used uclibc this time around, so didn't want to get into too much complexity and mess with hardened as well.


Good to hear!

 

Any specific reason for using uClibc? It never was intended for desktops/laptops afaik, reading this isn't too convincing either: http://lists.uclibc.org/pipermail/uclibc/2003-November/028204.html.

post #100 of 395
Quote:
Originally Posted by laen View Post

Good to hear!

 

Any specific reason for using uClibc? It never was intended for desktops/laptops afaik, reading this isn't too convincing either: http://lists.uclibc.org/pipermail/uclibc/2003-November/028204.html.

Started out when I was in need of a system for a very old subnotebook with 64MiB ram and 2GB storage, to be used as a bedside movie rig, and the extra space is much appreciated. It's gotten much better, though I'm still inclined to migrate to musl for the learning experience. Also need a base system for embedded work, and it's come in quite handy.

 

Have only half the ram used with links+mplayer on framebuffer, so I guess it's working out fairly well :P

post #101 of 395
Quote:
Originally Posted by TwinQY View Post

Started out when I was in need of a system for a very old subnotebook with 64MiB ram and 2GB storage, to be used as a bedside movie rig, and the extra space is much appreciated. It's gotten much better, though I'm still inclined to migrate to musl for the learning experience. Also need a base system for embedded work, and it's come in quite handy.

 

Have only half the ram used with links+mplayer on framebuffer, so I guess it's working out fairly well :P


Ah ye, I'm in for that as well as I just remembered I've got an OpenMoko FreeRunner lying around I need to put something on! Surely a good idea to go the uClibc path on that I'd say :).

post #102 of 395

I use Mint a lot, it's very good, although my fave is Fedora. 

post #103 of 395

Using Ubuntu 12.04 GNOME remix on this computer, very nice

post #104 of 395

Sounds nice. Just upgraded my 10.04 install used for recovery and GRUB on the lappie into 12.04.2. Unity's real nice. Don't think there's a DE out that I feel's worth the hate anymore. Though I would just stick to WM or framebuffer+tmux if I had to.

post #105 of 395

Using valgrind for memory analysis of c projects in my computer science couse, and since it's not windows compatable I'm now dual booting with Kubuntu 12.04. I love the operating system, it's the perfect balance between XFC (which I found to be incredibly fast and TOO minimalist) and gnome, which was pretty and all, but not as quick. With KDE I love how I can have multiple desktops and tab between them, and still have the luxury of the "snap to" commands.

 

Learning to work with bash commands has been...a fun challenge, I'll say, but I am coming along with it. Now, I do have one big challenge that's giving me all sorts of hell: Audio.

 

Amarok has given me nothing but problems. my chief difficulty is that I'm trying to use files from my windows partition, and after shutting down and restarting my pc, it loses them from the directory. It also crashes when trying to play mp3's, eventhough all the codecs are installed. It's pretty obnoxious. I'm going to attempt to install wine and then jriver on my linux partition. *shakes head* all I want to do is be able to listen to high quality tunes when I code. Is that so much to ask?

 

 

Note: I love computers, but they tend to not love me. I messed up this installation every way possible, and if it hadn't been for the genius that is our university's sysadmin, I would be doomed.

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
Head-Fi.org › Forums › Equipment Forums › Gear-Fi: Non-Audio Gear and Gadgets › Linux users unite!