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Linux users unite! - Page 3

post #31 of 387

My PC is dual booted with Win 7 and Ubuntu 12.04 and Ubuntu is definitely faster .

I still use my MBP with 10.8 as my go to machine.

post #32 of 387
Quote:
Originally Posted by micrors4 View Post

I think the only thing I usually have to do in terminal is CD'ing to something, everything else is just copy and paste.  The only time I have to compile something is when I making my own Android ROMs or Linux builds for my tablets, but most people aren't going to be doing that to often.

 

But there's so much more you can do with CLI! Time some scripts with cron, batch rename some music, the possibilities are endless! If it wasn't for the fact that most of the Internet nowadays is visually-based (I can still use elinks to surf a good majority of it though, including Head-Fi), and that 10-bit 720p mkvs look horrible on framebuffer, I would just install tmux and run pure CLI (and the speed benefits...oh, the speed benefits) . 

 

Agree with stuff like Arch and other binary distos, the need to compile is greatly lessened. Apart from the occasional custom kernel update, or the occasion weird package dependency to purge out.

post #33 of 387
Quote:
Originally Posted by TwinQY View Post

 

But there's so much more you can do with CLI! Time some scripts with cron, batch rename some music, the possibilities are endless! If it wasn't for the fact that most of the Internet nowadays is visually-based (I can still use elinks to surf a good majority of it though, including Head-Fi), and that 10-bit 720p mkvs look horrible on framebuffer, I would just install tmux and run pure CLI (and the speed benefits...oh, the speed benefits) . 

 

Agree with stuff like Arch and other binary distos, the need to compile is greatly lessened. Apart from the occasional custom kernel update, or the occasion weird package dependency to purge out.

 

Agree.

post #34 of 387
Quote:
Originally Posted by TwinQY View Post

 

But there's so much more you can do with CLI! Time some scripts with cron, batch rename some music, the possibilities are endless! If it wasn't for the fact that most of the Internet nowadays is visually-based (I can still use elinks to surf a good majority of it though, including Head-Fi), and that 10-bit 720p mkvs look horrible on framebuffer, I would just install tmux and run pure CLI (and the speed benefits...oh, the speed benefits) . 

 

Agree with stuff like Arch and other binary distos, the need to compile is greatly lessened. Apart from the occasional custom kernel update, or the occasion weird package dependency to purge out.


Been using Gentoo, as said before, on machines where the improvements do matter (so, for the slow crap), and it's not so much improvements because compiling makes everything faster, but because the memory footprint and sometimes the file size of the binaries shrinks, making old Pentium 3 and Pentium 4 snappy enough to be a production web server.

 

But I never really cared about the compiling, you can keep using the machine while the compile is running, and that's what I do. To give an idea, compiling the whole system and everything on it, on a Core i7, only takes around 2 hours.

post #35 of 387
Quote:
Originally Posted by laen View Post


Been using Gentoo, as said before, on machines where the improvements do matter (so, for the slow crap), and it's not so much improvements because compiling makes everything faster, but because the memory footprint and sometimes the file size of the binaries shrinks, making old Pentium 3 and Pentium 4 snappy enough to be a production web server.

 

But I never really cared about the compiling, you can keep using the machine while the compile is running, and that's what I do. To give an idea, compiling the whole system and everything on it, on a Core i7, only takes around 2 hours.

Agree. When your casual day-to-day machine on the go is a 12 year old Celeron, compiling makes a drastic difference in memory usage and size (especially when the hard drive only has 8Gb). What I usually do is have the smaller Celeron grab notifications for updates, sends the source to a desktop through SSH, which compiles it with all the proper flags (chroot preserved for that specific machine), then sends it back, leaving me with stuff to install later. Compiling can also be useful when the packages suddenly decide to include other dependencies by default (Stuff for X dragged in by vim, on a headless server? Right...) and you need the flexibility to strip that out.

post #36 of 387
Quote:
Originally Posted by proton007 View Post


Exactly. Aside from the fact that I find the terminal is better in some respects, most users don't have to use it.

 

I also think its conditioning. Most students in schools get started with windows (somehow they think they're teaching computers, when its really just teaching windows), atleast that was the case with me, I had to discover linux on my own (I was getting sick of Vista), and ended up wiping my windows partition the first time redface.gif. But then it gradually unfolded, and I saw the light.

 

I think the more ppl start using linux in their homes and schools, the younger generation will also adopt it.

At my high school we used windows in the CS classes but we also had macbook pros in the TV production classes so we at least got experience with two different OS's, however now in college I have access to computers running Fedora for the CS and computer engineering majors which is pretty neat as I haven't really been able to play with Fedora too much, but having experience gave me a huge advantage as most students had no idea how to use it at first and the potential it has.  Even being taught the Linux system, most students still choose to use PCs or macs to do any work, which I find crazy because it is so much easier in Linux because it plays nice with everything.

post #37 of 387

Anyone here use a roku box?  I just set up plex on fedora and it's pretty nice.  Surprised how easy it was too once I got the firewall sorted. 

Now all my movies on my linux box can stream to the tv; does music too, but don't see myself using that much.

 

oh well, just happy it's working...

post #38 of 387

No, but I use my media server to stream media to my PS3 for playback on the TV, its the ultimate setup because I can play blurays, games, and stream media all with one unit.

post #39 of 387
Does your media server setup include some kind of transcoding element? Most of videos unfortunately don't play on the PS3 and I'm looking for a solution that would allow me to avoid the hassle re-encoding my entire library.
post #40 of 387

No, I have to convert the media as I get it because my server isn't powerful enough to do on the fly transcoding for multiple devices so I just use my gaming PC to take advantage of the GPUs to transcode the video quickly before uploading to the server.  I suggest freemake video converter as it is very powerful and well designed plus you can't go wrong with the price ($0).

post #41 of 387

I'd put handbrake as a good alternative to freemake. Freemake is much more user-friendly though!

 

 

 

Has anyone tried Mint 14 on a Live USB? Was really surprised how everything worked out of the box. I have this monitor where every single OS has failed to detect the proper resolution. Had to stick with xrandr -r in the .xinitrc, Grub boot codes. Mint just took it and made it perfect, no adjustments. I don't think Mint 13 had even done that. 

post #42 of 387

Debian user here.  Tried Openbox a while back and didn't really like the way it feels, will give it another try later. Currently using GNOME and Xfce4. Anyone know a good font? Using FreeSans right now. Heard Freetype is good.

post #43 of 387

Yep, I always loved linux mint, it was the first linux OS I ever used but I now run Ubuntu on all my machines and the only reason I  keep windows around is to play games but that will soon change with steam on ubuntu.

post #44 of 387
Quote:
Originally Posted by Parall3l View Post

Debian user here.  Tried Openbox a while back and didn't really like the way it feels, will give it another try later. Currently using GNOME and Xfce4. Anyone know a good font? Using FreeSans right now. Heard Freetype is good.


There are a lot of sans-serif fonts you can get from google fonts, and they're all free.  However, in my experience the font aliasing in Linux makes most sans-serif fonts look the same, or similar.

 

Openbox is good (light and fast), but it doesn't have any effects, and depending on the desktop environment, theming (ie integration between the WM and the widget toolkit) can be a hit or miss.

 

Also, not sure if it'll work on your system, but try the infinality font config, it improves the font aliasing, and you can distinguish between different sans serif fonts.

post #45 of 387
Quote:
Originally Posted by micrors4 View Post

Yep, I always loved linux mint, it was the first linux OS I ever used but I now run Ubuntu on all my machines and the only reason I  keep windows around is to play games but that will soon change with steam on ubuntu.


Linux mint to me seems like Ubuntu made better. They listen to their users, and MATE and Cinnamon are pretty good.

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