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Can I bi-amp my speakers?

post #1 of 29
Thread Starter 

 

Hello guys/gals,
 
I'm very new to A/V equipment, but have just received a bunch of stuff for Christmas.
 
 
 
 
 
I realize the Polks allow for bi-amping. I am just trying to figure out if bi-amping the two Polks is going to work with a 5.1 receiver. 
 
I am just looking to run a 2.1 setup ( two speakers and a sub) for my home gym. Right now, I am only using channel "A"(speakers) and channel "B"(subwoofer).
 
With this setup, my "surround" is not being used. I figure that could be hooked up to my speakers, doubling the power.
 
Am I correct? Will this be too much power going to the speakers?
 
Anything else I should know?
 
Thank you very much in advance,
 
Connor
post #2 of 29

What your asking about is Bi-wiring, not Bi-amping.

As far as I can tell, the VSK-821-K (5.1) does not support Bi-wiring.

I'm guessing Bi-wiring is more for true 7.1 receivers.

 

Take the Pioneer back and get a receiver that supports bi-wiring, I like the Yamaha RX-A700 & RX-V667.

post #3 of 29
Thread Starter 

Thanks for the response.

 

Unfortunately, the two receivers you have listed are out of the price range. This is purely a gym set-up, I cannot justify spending anymore money than I already have.

 

I guess I am just confused as to why my L and R "surround" can't be connected to my L and R front speakers....

 

I have sent an email to Pioneer to try and get some definitive answers.

 

post #4 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shermanator View Post
Thanks for the response.

Unfortunately, the two receivers you have listed are out of the price range. This is purely a gym set-up, I cannot justify spending anymore money than I already have.

I guess I am just confused as to why my L and R "surround" can't be connected to my L and R front speakers....

I have sent an email to Pioneer to try and get some definitive answers.


I'm guessing one way Pioneer controls the cost is to limit what features goes into each receiver.

I'm also guessing 9 out of 10 people would go 5.1 instead of 2.1 bi-wiring.

Also most people that spend that amount of money on a receiver would not spend that much money for bi-wire/Bi-amping capable  speakers.

Good luck.

 

 

post #5 of 29

You should be able to biamp your speakers with your 5.1 receiver. Essentially, your receiver has 2 stereo amps plus one mono amp for the subwoofer. So the front channels can feed the L/R mid-tweeters and the rear channels can feed the L/R woofers.

 

One more thing, your speakers should have 2 pairs of terminals and those are connected by a wire or a metal bracket. Remove them first before biamping them.


Edited by wuwhere - 12/25/11 at 9:37pm
post #6 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by wuwhere View Post
You should be able to biamp your speakers with your 5.1 receiver. Essentially, your receiver has 2 stereo amps plus one mono amp for the subwoofer. So the front channels can feed the L/R mid-tweeters and the rear channels can feed the L/R woofers.

One more thing, your speakers should have 2 pairs of terminals and those are connected by a wire or a metal bracket. Remove them first before biamping them.


I download the manual for his Pioneer, could not find any Bi-wire or Bi-amping settings at all (but sometimes I do miss somethings).

But i really doubt he will be able to setup bi-wiring/Bi-amping.

 

 

post #7 of 29
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by wuwhere View Post

You should be able to biamp your speakers with your 5.1 receiver. Essentially, your receiver has 2 stereo amps plus one mono amp for the subwoofer. So the front channels can feed the L/R mid-tweeters and the rear channels can feed the L/R woofers.

 

One more thing, your speakers should have 2 pairs of terminals and those are connected by a wire or a metal bracket. Remove them first before biamping them.



 



Quote:
Originally Posted by PurpleAngel View Post


I download the manual for his Pioneer, could not find any Bi-wire or Bi-amping settings at all (but sometimes I do miss somethings).

But i really doubt he will be able to setup bi-wiring/Bi-amping.

 

 


In for wuwhere's response.

 

:)

 

post #8 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by PurpleAngel View Post


I download the manual for his Pioneer, could not find any Bi-wire or Bi-amping settings at all (but sometimes I do miss somethings).

But i really doubt he will be able to setup bi-wiring/Bi-amping.

 

 



The manual does not tell you these things. There are two sets of speaker outputs, front and B. The front will be used normally for stereo. I would move the speakers to B and check that there's output to the speakers. If so, then the connection will be front to the mids/tweeters and B to the woofers of the speakers, that's how biamp is.

post #9 of 29
Thread Starter 

Just to give people some visual cues:

 

This is what the back of my receiver looks like: http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff442/shermanatorx/003-3.jpg

 

The "A" channel is being used for the front speakers, and the "B" channel is for the sub.

 

It just feels weird that the "center" and "surround" channels are going to waste.

 

Here is the back of one of the Polks too: http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff442/shermanatorx/004-1.jpg

 

Sorry for all the questions and "jumping around", I am just trying to make sure I get some concrete answers.

 

Can't blame a young buck for trying to get some better sound quality.    :D

post #10 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shermanator View Post

Just to give people some visual cues:

 

This is what the back of my receiver looks like: http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff442/shermanatorx/003-3.jpg

 

The "A" channel is being used for the front speakers, and the "B" channel is for the sub.

 

It just feels weird that the "center" and "surround" channels are going to waste.

 

Here is the back of one of the Polks too: http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/ff442/shermanatorx/004-1.jpg

 

Sorry for all the questions and "jumping around", I am just trying to make sure I get some concrete answers.

 

Can't blame a young buck for trying to get some better sound quality.    :D



That should work for biamping your speakers. Make sure that you remove that metal bracket between the speaker terminals before you biamp.

post #11 of 29
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by wuwhere View Post



That should work for biamping your speakers. Make sure that you remove that metal bracket between the speaker terminals before you biamp.



Awesome!

 

When you say it should work, I assume you're referring to using the "surround" channel....

 

Would I keep my "A" channel the same(on the receiver and speakers)?

 

So I would basically be connecting the R surround to the right speaker, and the L surround to the left speaker?

 

Is this correct?

 

Thanks again wuwhere.

post #12 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shermanator View Post



Awesome!

 

When you say it should work, I assume you're referring to using the "surround" channel....

 

Would I keep my "A" channel the same(on the receiver and speakers)?

 

So I would basically be connecting the R surround to the right speaker, and the L surround to the left speaker?

 

Is this correct?

 

Thanks again wuwhere.



Yes, the A pair to the top speaker terminals and the B to the bottom speaker terminals.

 

Make sure that you remove those brackets first, if you don't they will cause a short and your receiver will go up in flames.

post #13 of 29
Thread Starter 

Is the end goal of bi-amping just essentially doubling the power output?

 

If so, that may pose a problem in itself. 

 

My specific speakers recommend 20-125 watts per channel. I think if I bi-amp them, they will surpass 125 watts.

 

 

Am I correct? Will this cause a problem?

post #14 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shermanator View Post

Is the end goal of bi-amping just essentially doubling the power output?

 

If so, that may pose a problem in itself. 

 

My specific speakers recommend 20-125 watts per channel. I think if I bi-amp them, they will surpass 125 watts.

 

 

Am I correct? Will this cause a problem?


Your speakers will only use the power it needs to reproduce the signal it is being asked to. So it will never use all that power unless you crank it up and you have a large room.

 

Biamping is usually done to increase power using the same amplifier model, to lower the stress on the single amplifier. This usually results in better overall sound.

 

It can also be used to power the mids/tweeters with a tube amp and the woofers with solid state amp. In this case, care has to be taken that the sound is well balanced between the lows and the highs. The reason is the sensivity between the amps may be different.

 

There are other reasons like using less powerful amps for the mids/tweeters and more powerful for the woofers.

 

Of course, the cost is very high.

post #15 of 29
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by wuwhere View Post


Your speakers will only use the power it needs to reproduce the signal it is being asked to. So it will never use all that power unless you crank it up and you have a large room.

 

Biamping is usually done to increase power using the same amplifier model, to lower the stress on the single amplifier. This usually results in better overall sound.

 

It can also be used to power the mids/tweeters with a tube amp and the woofers with solid state amp. In this case, care has to be taken that the sound is well balanced between the lows and the highs. The reason is the sensivity between the amps may be different.

 

There are other reasons like using less powerful amps for the mids/tweeters and more powerful for the woofers.

 

Of course, the cost is very high.



Alright, sounds good.

 

I'll update this thread when I have gone through the bi-amping process, and have had a chance to listen to the speakers.

 

Thanks guys.

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