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Am I so bad in identifying sound quality? - Page 9

post #121 of 571
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by tinyman392 View Post

Grado IEMs are very bass heavy and tend to have a V-shape to them...  I'd still recommend Etymotic, Brainwavz, ACS... 


If GR07 is very bass heavy then it won't do for me as I primarily listen to classical. I once tried bass-heavy Sony Xb500 and the sound for classical was crap to me.

 

post #122 of 571
Quote:
Originally Posted by lostid View Post


If GR07 is very bass heavy then it won't do for me as I primarily listen to classical. I once tried bass-heavy Sony Xb500 and the sound for classical was crap to me.

 



From what I hear the GR07 has quite a bit of bass but is still very balanced. So it has quantity while still maintaining a balanced sound signature. So the treble and mids are in synch with the bass.

post #123 of 571
Thread Starter 

I hope to hear from someone who listens to classical music with GR07 or other IEMs

post #124 of 571

I listen to a lot of classical, from renaissance mass, to baroque to classical era to romantics to 20th century composers and recordings from string quartets to symphonies, cantatas, opera, etc.

 

I would say that bass is not the enemy of classical music if well controlled and balanced and that, in fact, a cold, dry, bass-lite earphone doesn't do justice to the full range of many classical music pieces or the emotional depth they evoke. Without bass, timpani, double bass, cellos, baritone and bass voices, etc. just aren't present as they should be.

 

The issue is not bass, but rather balance and control with a special focus on timbre--the realistic reproduction of the subtle resonances in instrumental and vocal music.

 

In fact, two of my favorite earphones are the monster turbine pro copper, which while being quite bass capable, has good balance and control and also the FS Atrio, which has good timbre reproduction and a well-controlled bass with excellent extension. I haven't heard the GR07, but I wouldn't count it out as I think Lee730's description makes it sound like a good earphone for classical. I would avoid etymotic's anemic bass, but some classical listeners would disagree.

post #125 of 571
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kunlun View Post

I listen to a lot of classical, from renaissance mass, to baroque to classical era to romantics to 20th century composers and recordings from string quartets to symphonies, cantatas, opera, etc.

 

I would say that bass is not the enemy of classical music if well controlled and balanced and that, in fact, a cold, dry, bass-lite earphone doesn't do justice to the full range of many classical music pieces or the emotional depth they evoke. Without bass, timpani, double bass, cellos, baritone and bass voices, etc. just aren't present as they should be.

 

The issue is not bass, but rather balance and control with a special focus on timbre--the realistic reproduction of the subtle resonances in instrumental and vocal music.

 

In fact, two of my favorite earphones are the monster turbine pro copper, which while being quite bass capable, has good balance and control and also the FS Atrio, which has good timbre reproduction and a well-controlled bass with excellent extension. I haven't heard the GR07, but I wouldn't count it out as I think Lee730's description makes it sound like a good earphone for classical. I would avoid etymotic's anemic bass, but some classical listeners would disagree.

Thanks for sharing your listening experience. How is the violin sound at high note for the two IEMs you mentioned? This is where the EX600 bothers me the most. I am hoping that will subdue with more burn in.
 

 

post #126 of 571

Ah, I think I get it now, you have some resonance at that frequency range (Using physics term)...  LOL, that's just bad luck really, I get that with the A151s :(  Nothing you can really do about that, it deals with the length of your ear and the distance between the IEM's driver and your ear along with the shape of your ear...  Lots of things have to match up for it to happen...

 

To confirm, violins sound really loud right?  Like there is a spike in loudness at that frequency...  Just FYI, burn in can reduce that resonance by a certain percentage, but it will never go away.


Edited by tinyman392 - 1/2/12 at 4:57pm
post #127 of 571
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by tinyman392 View Post

Ah, I think I get it now, you have some resonance at that frequency range (Using physics term)...  LOL, that's just bad luck really, I get that with the A151s :(  Nothing you can really do about that, it deals with the length of your ear and the distance between the IEM's driver and your ear along with the shape of your ear...  Lots of things have to match up for it to happen...

 

To confirm, violins sound really loud right?  Like there is a spike in loudness at that frequency...  Just FYI, burn in can reduce that resonance by a certain percentage, but it will never go away.


As I previously mentioned, at high note the violin sound is too harsh/crispy and hurting my ears. It's not about loudness.

 

post #128 of 571
Quote:
Originally Posted by lostid View Post


As I previously mentioned, at high note the violin sound is too harsh/crispy and hurting my ears. It's not about loudness.

 



Is it only that high note though?  If it is, that's resonance (physics definition) which isn't intended on any IEM, but a possibility.  That normally means you should try a different pair of IEMs (cause nothing will fix this one for you, changing tips, chanting, etc).

post #129 of 571
Quote:
Originally Posted by tinyman392 View Post



Is it only that high note though?  If it is, that's resonance (physics definition) which isn't intended on any IEM, but a possibility.  That normally means you should try a different pair of IEMs (cause nothing will fix this one for you, changing tips, chanting, etc).



Hes most likely getting the treble spike. The EX series is notorious for this with some models being worse than others. The main reason why I sold my EX1000s. I still feel the GR07 is a good solution but it isn't the most fun IEM but more on the balanced side with all frequencies being quite good. They also benefit greatly with extended use. The EX1000 really didn't change much with burn in, kinda reminds me more of BA but with dynamic qualities.


Edited by lee730 - 1/3/12 at 12:23am
post #130 of 571

I would say look into BA drivers - such as the se535's, W3's/2's, PFE 232's/PFE121(2)'s for classical - BA's excel in classical

 

(of course I'm mentioning quite expensive ones here, but you can look lower down the line too)

PFE121's are brilliant for their price.


Edited by Totally Dubbed - 1/3/12 at 3:43am
post #131 of 571
Quote:
Originally Posted by lostid View Post

As I previously mentioned, at high note the violin sound is too harsh/crispy and hurting my ears. It's not about loudness.

 

The EX600 are pretty harsh out-of-box and smooth out over the first few hours of use. If they're still hurting your ears after 20 hours or so, re-check your fit and try different tips (if possible). If none of that helps, you may sadly be too sensitive to the Sony's treble spikes.

 

That said, the Yamaha EPH-100 cost about the same, have more polite treble in comparison and sound great with classical. They don't have the Sony's headphone-like presentation though.
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Totally Dubbed View Post

I would say look into BA drivers - such as the se535's, W3's/2's, PFE 232's/PFE121(2)'s for classical - BA's excel in classical

 

I disagree, most BA based IEMs have less natural timbre with acoustic instruments than comparably priced dynamics. Some are better than others IME, like the W4, PFEs and Final Audios, but in general I do prefer DDs over BAs for classical.

post #132 of 571
Quote:
Originally Posted by james444 View Post
I disagree, most BA based IEMs have less natural timbre with acoustic instruments than comparably priced dynamics. Some are better than others IME, like the W4, PFEs and Final Audios, but in general I do prefer DDs over BAs for classical.


I found there was much better music separation in BA's, and thus making it great for classical.

 

 

post #133 of 571
Quote:
Originally Posted by Totally Dubbed View Post

I found there was much better music separation in BA's, and thus making it great for classical.


Of course it's a question of preference, analytical listeners will probably prioritize separation over everything else, and I don't deny that BAs excel at that. But DDs like the Sony EX600/1000 and EPH-100 don't fall far short in separation and sound less artificial to my ears than most BAs.

post #134 of 571
Quote:
Originally Posted by james444 View Post


Of course it's a question of preference, analytical listeners will probably prioritize separation over everything else, and I don't deny that BAs excel at that. But DDs like the Sony EX600/1000 and EPH-100 don't fall far short in separation and sound less artificial to my ears than most BAs.



fair enough :)
I do remember the EX700's being excellent, but at the same time unbearable to listen lol.

 

post #135 of 571
Quote:
Originally Posted by lostid View Post

Thanks for sharing your listening experience. How is the violin sound at high note for the two IEMs you mentioned? This is where the EX600 bothers me the most. I am hoping that will subdue with more burn in.
 

 


Both nice. The mtpc has an edgier treble. The Atrio has a non-fatiguing sound with excellent accurate reproduction of strings.

 

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