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Burn-in. Real or not? - Page 16

post #226 of 228
Quote:
Originally Posted by Danneq View Post



 


 

 

Burning headphones that you don't like?
 

 

Better to know what something sounds like for the vast majority of it's use.

There have been speakers that I liked less after break in.frown.gif

Wilson W/P 7 is an example.


Edited by goodvibes - 12/28/11 at 8:06am
post #227 of 228

Here's an idea of an ABX of a driver, but it's very labor-intensive.

What you'd need to do is to replace the driver with a burned-in one and do that without damaging the headphone or distorting it.

This could also help estimate the magnitude of the effect (use a few drivers that have been burned-in differently).

 

To remove possible "mechanical" burn-in, you should use the same frame that's been "burned in" by long-term usage.

The "installation" error can be estimated by just removing and replacing the same driver multiple times.

The headphone has to be designed so that it's possible to replace the driver easily and it's not possible to discern the driver.

 

A measurement would be good for estimating whether the difference exists, while such complex double-blind test would be good for checking whether that change is audible.

post #228 of 228
Quote:
Originally Posted by AstralStorm View Post

Here's an idea of an ABX of a driver, but it's very labor-intensive.

What you'd need to do is to replace the driver with a burned-in one and do that without damaging the headphone or distorting it.

This could also help estimate the magnitude of the effect (use a few drivers that have been burned-in differently).

 

To remove possible "mechanical" burn-in, you should use the same frame that's been "burned in" by long-term usage.

The "installation" error can be estimated by just removing and replacing the same driver multiple times.

The headphone has to be designed so that it's possible to replace the driver easily and it's not possible to discern the driver.

 

A measurement would be good for estimating whether the difference exists, while such complex double-blind test would be good for checking whether that change is audible.


Problem arises when you switch drivers...  You are putting force on the actual IEMs (regardless if they are inserted mechanical or manual) which changes seal.  You may (may or may not) actually have a better chance of getting the same insertion by taking it out and putting it back in...  Both ways still have plenty of error, however, that's why you take multiple trials.  Multiple trials confirm results void of error and average them (reducing error even more).

 

Remember, error is unavoidable, and something all scientist must deal with, that is why they look for basic patterns/outputs that lead in a certain direction.  They can also reduce error buy doing multiple trials. 


Edited by tinyman392 - 12/30/11 at 12:26pm
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