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post #13381 of 130948
Thread Starter 

Something was concerning me when I was listening to that 3D sound demonstration. I always felt like I was toward the left of the demonstration. The sound always shifts toward my right ear. It might just be my setup, but I think I have a pretty bad hearing imbalance.

post #13382 of 130948
Quote:
Originally Posted by HybridCore View Post

Something was concerning me when I was listening to that 3D sound demonstration. I always felt like I was toward the left of the demonstration. The sound always shifts toward my right ear. It might just be my setup, but I think I have a pretty bad hearing imbalance.

That was a very interesting demo! However when they did do the demo, I wasn't convinced of the full ramifcations on its success yet. It still needs to fulfill the real life stage. Theretically it sounds nice!! But when they did it, it was meh.

post #13383 of 130948
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by bowei006 View Post

That was a very interesting demo! However when they did do the demo, I wasn't convinced of the full ramifcations on its success yet. It still needs to fulfill the real life stage. Theretically it sounds nice!! But when they did it, it was meh.

It's Youtube. What did you expect? rolleyes.gif

 

If we had a good copy of the demo, it would have sounded much nicer through good speakers (not intended for headphones).

post #13384 of 130948
Quote:
Originally Posted by HybridCore View Post

It's Youtube. What did you expect? rolleyes.gif

 

If we had a good copy of the demo, it would have sounded much nicer through good speakers (not intended for headphones).

But the thing is, he said it was for laptop speakers. And a well recorded and done track shouldn't be too bad on youtube. 

post #13385 of 130948
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by bowei006 View Post

But the thing is, he said it was for laptop speakers. And a well recorded and done track shouldn't be too bad on youtube. 

Technically, you could do it with a 2.0 or 2.1 setup. Laptop speakers are 2.0 or 2.1.

 

I can't tell because I don't have acceptable audio equipment. Remember?

 

Well, looks like I won't be making the thread today because I've procrastinated too much.

post #13386 of 130948

Haiby, this is what I personally think anyone in your position should do. First off, don't spend a lot on audio. It's your first time in, and I believe one should learn to appreciate decent audio from a low standpoint before they are able to take in the high stuff. Because honestly, I found it really tough to discern the difference between something like an AD700 and a D2000 in a lot of the nuances before(besides bass), just because I had little experience with analyzing the different sounds of headphones. Someone could tell me something was considered "bright" or had "recessed mids" but I had no idea what that really means because for one, I had no idea what was neutral. My neutral was the AD700 because it was pretty much the closest headphone I had to being so which I found later.

 

I feel without deeper knowledge and experience with what you are buying it will only lead to satisfaction that could of been had with lesser equipment to the uneducated ear. Some people do not believe in this theory and think you should dive in where you feel comfortable but I totally disagree with that. It's tough to justify $800 on audio to me if you truly have no experience with any equipment in the lower ranges. So here is what I believe YOU should do.

 

Spend $200-400 on audio equipment

 

Buy two headphones a DAC and maybe an Amp...hybrid amp? maybe.

 

Among the two headphones buy two that contrast each other or fit two different purposes. Someone like you would definitely want a can that absolutely excels with classical music and another that may be more balanced in it's repertoire or is good with popular music.

 

Get a basic DAC and/or amp. I totally think a Hybrid DAC/amp is a great beginner choice. But the DAC is probably more important than the amp at this point.

 

I really love this method because it gets your feet wet into audio without extreme commitment. If you don't feel all this is for you? You can definitely say you didn't break the bank on it and you save money for your ultrabook stuff that you KNOW you will love and can use. I have been very grateful for how I've gone through audio. I've learned how things scale, how to justify price on audio, and a much better understanding of equipment than if I just jumped deep into mid-high end equipment.

post #13387 of 130948

Only downside to my method? It may leave you wanting for more....well, that may happen regardless, but it makes your climb possibly longer and much more money intensive. I don't think that's a bad thing though, it makes you more of an audiophile and much more experienced wink_face.gif

post #13388 of 130948
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by B-Dawk20 View Post

Haiby, this is what I personally think anyone in your position should do. First off, don't spend a lot on audio. It's your first time in, and I believe one should learn to appreciate decent audio from a low standpoint before they are able to take in the high stuff. Because honestly, I found it really tough to discern the difference between something like an AD700 and a D2000 in a lot of the nuances before(besides bass), just because I had little experience with analyzing the different sounds of headphones. Someone could tell me something was considered "bright" or had "recessed mids" but I had no idea what that really means because for one, I had no idea what was neutral. My neutral was the AD700 because it was pretty much the closest headphone I had to being so which I found later.

 

I feel without deeper knowledge and experience with what you are buying it will only lead to satisfaction that could of been had with lesser equipment to the uneducated ear. Some people do not believe in this theory and think you should dive in where you feel comfortable but I totally disagree with that. It's tough to justify $800 on audio to me if you truly have no experience with any equipment in the lower ranges. So here is what I believe YOU should do.

 

Spend $200-400 on audio equipment

 

Buy two headphones a DAC and maybe an Amp...hybrid amp? maybe.

 

Among the two headphones buy two that contrast each other or fit two different purposes. Someone like you would definitely want a can that absolutely excels with classical music and another that may be more balanced in it's repertoire or is good with popular music.

 

Get a basic DAC and/or amp. I totally think a Hybrid DAC/amp is a great beginner choice. But the DAC is probably more important than the amp at this point.

 

I really love this method because it gets your feet wet into audio without extreme commitment. If you don't feel all this is for you? You can definitely say you didn't break the bank on it and you save money for your ultrabook stuff that you KNOW you will love and can use. I have been very grateful for how I've gone through audio. I've learned how things scale, how to justify price on audio, and a much better understanding of equipment than if I just jumped deep into mid-high end equipment.

I actually like this idea very much, although I think I might go with IEMs instead of full sized headphones if I were to do this. If I did spend $400 though, about half would be taken up by the DAC and amp at the least if I were to get something good (using the price of the Audio-GD NFB 12 as reference). I also want a good amount of money to still have.

post #13389 of 130948
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by B-Dawk20 View Post

Only downside to my method? It may leave you wanting for more....well, that may happen regardless, but it makes your climb possibly longer and much more money intensive. I don't think that's a bad thing though, it makes you more of an audiophile and much more experienced wink_face.gif

Yup. Well, a pair of inexpensive reference IEMs wouldn't hurt. Then I would have the low end of audio (cheap philips earbuds and I can always go to the store to test out some Beats which will sound as muddy as always, well, at least the Solo HD), low to middle mid-fi (IEMs), and higher mid-fi (headphones). That might be the compromise between the 2.

 

B-Dawk, I also forgot that I can go down to the headphone store in NY when I can. Plenty of headphones there.

post #13390 of 130948

@Bdawk

 

Hahahahaha Hai-by!!! LOL!!!! You have good advice, but granted...most in the end get the audio bug and want more

 

@Haiburdio chan

The chance of you getting the audio bug is high, my own advice is to go big...so you won't have to spend another $500 after you bought that initial setup to get to another level tier.

post #13391 of 130948
Quote:
Originally Posted by B-Dawk20 View Post

Haiby, this is what I personally think anyone in your position should do. First off, don't spend a lot on audio. It's your first time in, and I believe one should learn to appreciate decent audio from a low standpoint before they are able to take in the high stuff. Because honestly, I found it really tough to discern the difference between something like an AD700 and a D2000 in a lot of the nuances before(besides bass), just because I had little experience with analyzing the different sounds of headphones. Someone could tell me something was considered "bright" or had "recessed mids" but I had no idea what that really means because for one, I had no idea what was neutral. My neutral was the AD700 because it was pretty much the closest headphone I had to being so which I found later.

I feel without deeper knowledge and experience with what you are buying it will only lead to satisfaction that could of been had with lesser equipment to the uneducated ear. Some people do not believe in this theory and think you should dive in where you feel comfortable but I totally disagree with that. It's tough to justify $800 on audio to me if you truly have no experience with any equipment in the lower ranges. So here is what I believe YOU should do.

Spend $200-400 on audio equipment

Buy two headphones a DAC and maybe an Amp...hybrid amp? maybe.

Among the two headphones buy two that contrast each other or fit two different purposes. Someone like you would definitely want a can that absolutely excels with classical music and another that may be more balanced in it's repertoire or is good with popular music.

Get a basic DAC and/or amp. I totally think a Hybrid DAC/amp is a great beginner choice. But the DAC is probably more important than the amp at this point.

I really love this method because it gets your feet wet into audio without extreme commitment. If you don't feel all this is for you? You can definitely say you didn't break the bank on it and you save money for your ultrabook stuff that you KNOW you will love and can use. I have been very grateful for how I've gone through audio. I've learned how things scale, how to justify price on audio, and a much better understanding of equipment than if I just jumped deep into mid-high end equipment.
Interesting.

I personally went straight to an HD650 with mid-fi tube amp. It took me a lot of time to appreciate how good this system was, but eventually it does happen when you start to analyze the music and play around with DSPs. I did get a different mid-fi headphone about 4 months later, but I never bothered to do a detailed comparison, yet I could still hear the difference in fidelity with the greatest ease. I don't think it's necessary to start with a low budget and slowly increase from there as you suggested. Spending a large amount of time with a better headphone works just as well.
Only recently have a I got a different headphone of similar caliber, and hearing the contrasts in sound is definitely a very interesting exercise, which is exactly why I'm busy writing such a long review.
post #13392 of 130948
Quote:
Originally Posted by HybridCore View Post

Yup. Well, a pair of inexpensive reference IEMs wouldn't hurt. Then I would have the low end of audio (cheap philips earbuds and I can always go to the store to test out some Beats which will sound as muddy as always, well, at least the Solo HD), low to middle mid-fi (IEMs), and higher mid-fi (headphones). That might be the compromise between the 2.

 

B-Dawk, I also forgot that I can go down to the headphone store in NY when I can. Plenty of headphones there.

 

 

That's great then. I think based on this you should get one full sized headphone and one IEM. The IEM should probably be the one that is more useful for pop music since most people don't like to listen to classical and heavily analyze it while on the go lol. The home one should be more suited for doing your work with music notation and listening to your pieces or whatever you may be doing.

 

As far as the NFB12 is concerned...eh, I dunno, I didn't realize what it was while I was listening but I wasn't overly impressed by it. I did like how it had a gain switch though! I really don't want to get into too much because I didn't spend a lot of time with it. I do think a $100-200 hybrid amp like the NFB or the D1 is good for you. The D1 is really the only one I can vouch for though so try and ask others darthsmile.gif *pat pats D1*

 

 

Now I think that leaves you $100~ per headphone. I think you will be quite happy with what can be had at that price.

post #13393 of 130948
Quote:
Originally Posted by B-Dawk20 View Post


That's great then. I think based on this you should get one full sized headphone and one IEM. The IEM should probably be the one that is more useful for pop music since most people don't like to listen to classical and heavily analyze it while on the go lol. The home one should be more suited for doing your work with music notation and listening to your pieces or whatever you may be doing.

As far as the NFB12 is concerned...eh, I dunno, I didn't realize what it was while I was listening but I wasn't overly impressed by it. I did like how it had a gain switch though! I really don't want to get into too much because I didn't spend a lot of time with it. I do think a $100-200 hybrid amp like the NFB or the D1 is good for you. The D1 is really the only one I can vouch for though so try and ask others darthsmile.gif *pat pats D1*


Now I think that leaves you $100~ per headphone. I think you will be quite happy with what can be had at that price.
I personally think the NFB-12 is an excellent choice for a budget amp/DAC, but then again, it's the only unit of the sort I have ever heard. Very few people have actually compared multiple budget amp/DAC's as far as I know. I do know Brooko choose the NFB-12 over the FiiO E7+E9, so it can't be all that bad. Furthermore, the NFB-12 is fairly neutral and has plenty of power, so it should be pretty future proof too.
post #13394 of 130948

I can vouch for the NFB 12.1 and Objective 2 and E17! 

post #13395 of 130948
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tilpo View Post


Interesting.
I personally went straight to an HD650 with mid-fi tube amp. It took me a lot of time to appreciate how good this system was, but eventually it does happen when you start to analyze the music and play around with DSPs. I did get a different mid-fi headphone about 4 months later, but I never bothered to do a detailed comparison, yet I could still hear the difference in fidelity with the greatest ease. I don't think it's necessary to start with a low budget and slowly increase from there as you suggested. Spending a large amount of time with a better headphone works just as well.
Only recently have a I got a different headphone of similar caliber, and hearing the contrasts in sound is definitely a very interesting exercise, which is exactly why I'm busy writing such a long review.

 

 

Like I said, some people just feel it unnecessary and I don't mind that at all. The only thing I can undeniably say is there is much less room for regret for what I go after. Some people will feel very little desire to move beyond low-midfi stuff like Imperial(I think it was him...) who cared not to move up beyond that. Others will move up rather quickly and so on, but it's just much less room to be unsatisfied with your purchase. That and me personally, I wanted to be able to get all the nuances of the price range while remaining less biased from hearing high end stuff. I personally know I'd have to constantly watch myself and dissociate from the urge to dismiss all low end equipment. But now I don't think I'd ever be able not to appreciate a porta pro or a PX100 for what they are because I've spent time in that range. My audio journey is one that I feel encompasses the full spectrum a lot more albeit slower of a climb.

 

That and you don't have to necessarily climb like I do either. You can start low and jump much higher and I'd still be fine with that. I just don't think one should go there without training their ear a bit first, just my personal belief. I especially...wholeheartedly believe this is true for DACs and amps. I am still of little hands on knowledge on them. Have a tough time telling them apart too...mostly because I don't have very revealing headphones and need others to test out synergy and the like. Like I know the D1 so far has just not been a good match with certain headphones. The T1, D7000, and K701 come to mind so far.

 

But back to my main point, I feel especially in hybrid's case where he has other things to buy, he should lower his audio budget and grow more before he jumps anywhere else. A bang for your buck hybrid amp and some lowfi/entry level cans will satisfy him I'd think.

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