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[Review] Brainwavz HM5, A New Neutral Champ - Page 85

post #1261 of 1680
Quote:
Originally Posted by kingpage View Post

This one is cheaper at $11, but only offers 120ohm and 240ohm. (you could ask them if they do 150ohm too)

 

http://www.ebay.com.au/itm/Etymotic-ER4P-ER4S-3-5MM-plug-resistor-adaptor-/270986675386?pt=US_Headphones&hash=item3f181084ba

 

I think 150ohm would be closer to bring 64ohm to 200ohm.

 

I've owned and used several of these things before (51, 150, 300 ohm). No way this will turn your headphones into a "High Edition". I can't say I paid too close attention to any changes in sound and I didn't notice anything really, but certainly nothing dramatic or that sounds like you've upgraded or something. If anything it's possible it would just make the sound worse as apparently these adapters actually raise the output impedance of your amp.

 

By the way, if anyone was planning to buy one of these, don't go for the cheaper ones made by "wemakeamp." Build quality is quite sub par IME.


Edited by manveru - 6/16/12 at 10:39pm
post #1262 of 1680
Quote:
Originally Posted by manveru View Post

 

I've owned and used several of these things before (51, 150, 300 ohm). No way this will turn your headphones into a "High Edition". I can't say I paid too close attention to any changes in sound and I didn't notice anything really, but certainly nothing dramatic or that sounds like you've upgraded or something. If anything it's possible it would just make the sound worse as apparently these adapters actually raise the output impedance of your amp.

 

It's the same principle as ER4P 74ohm adapters, but they put the resisters in the high eddition FA-002W. Did your amp have enough juice to drive them properly?

post #1263 of 1680
Thread Starter 

What does an ohm resistance adapter do/accomplish?

post #1264 of 1680
Quote:
Originally Posted by kingpage View Post

It's the same principle as ER4P 74ohm adapters, but they put the resisters in the high eddition FA-002W. Did your amp have enough juice to drive them properly?

 

Vintage Sansui G-5700. 75W RMS for speakers. Don't know exactly how much is coming out of the headphone jack, but people have used smaller amps to drive tougher headphones. Also did this with my Matrix Cube back when I had it. Should have had more than enough power I think.


Edited by manveru - 6/16/12 at 11:03pm
post #1265 of 1680
Quote:
Originally Posted by keanex View Post

What does an ohm resistance adapter do/accomplish?

 

There was a thread about this very subject, but for the life of me I can't seem to find it. If I understand correctly (I'm not extremely knowledgeable on the technical stuff) messing with impedance can result in changes in frequency response. Don't know if you've heard of the whole 1/8 rule business? In the thread I was talking about people were explaining that the types of resistor adapters linked to above should serve the effect of raising the output impedance of the amplifier. There is another type of adapter you have to make if your goal is to lower output impedance.

post #1266 of 1680
post #1267 of 1680

 

Good link. Thanks!

post #1268 of 1680
Thread Starter 

I've read through that and understand the dampening factor, but they all use different drivers so despite them tuned to sound similar, they're going to have differences. I guess a resistance adapter would best be used in applications of pairing a high output amp with a low resistance headphone? I just simply can't fathom how adding artificial resistance would change the sound, other than changing how much power is going to the drivers.

post #1269 of 1680

These look really interesting, but I'm still wary about how well they handle multiple types of metal.

post #1270 of 1680
Quote:
Originally Posted by bowlofsoup View Post

These look really interesting, but I'm still wary about how well they handle multiple types of metal.

 

Personally I wouldn't recommend them for that genre at all. They are way too laid back IMO.

post #1271 of 1680

Oh, I finally found that one thread I was referring to earlier:

 

http://www.head-fi.org/t/601669/impedance-adapters-cables-explained-listed

post #1272 of 1680
Quote:
Originally Posted by manveru View Post

 

Personally I wouldn't recommend them for that genre at all. They are way too laid back IMO.

Thanks for the help man. They just looked really nice. From experience though, I know that people here know what they're doing.

post #1273 of 1680
Quote:
Originally Posted by manveru View Post

Personally I wouldn't recommend them for that genre at all. They are way too laid back IMO.

Are you talking about the DT880? Why do you think that?
post #1274 of 1680
Quote:
Originally Posted by LosNir View Post


Are you talking about the DT880? Why do you think that?

 

No HM5. I assumed that's what bowlofsoup was referring to at least?

post #1275 of 1680
Quote:
Originally Posted by keanex View Post

I've read through that and understand the dampening factor, but they all use different drivers so despite them tuned to sound similar, they're going to have differences. I guess a resistance adapter would best be used in applications of pairing a high output amp with a low resistance headphone? I just simply can't fathom how adding artificial resistance would change the sound, other than changing how much power is going to the drivers.

Well, a resistor adapter would change the overall sound because it would simulate having an amp with a higher output impedance. You can then use the impedance curve to calculate how the sound would change based on the resistor added and the amp's original output impedance. 

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