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post #6736 of 7980
Quote:
Originally Posted by uchihaitachi View Post

I got to demo the 5A today. I was surprised that it doesn't sound much like my 8A at all?! It sounds more similar to the JH16?!!

 

Sorry I couldn't make the meet after all. Did you get a chance to listen to the Tzar 350s in the end?

post #6737 of 7980

Sorry if this has been covered a hundred times before, can I check though, the cable - is it swappable with Westone cables?

 

Thanks :)

post #6738 of 7980
Quote:
Originally Posted by uchihaitachi View Post

I got to demo the 5A today. I was surprised that it doesn't sound much like my 8A at all?! It sounds more similar to the JH16?!!

In what way? Did you prefer them to your 8A?

post #6739 of 7980
Quote:
Originally Posted by CraftyClown View Post

 

Sorry I couldn't make the meet after all. Did you get a chance to listen to the Tzar 350s in the end?

YEs thank you!

post #6740 of 7980
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ivabign View Post

In what way? Did you prefer them to your 8A?

The 8A seems to have a slightly more laid back treble with less of an attack and its bass is more controlled albeit more powerful. But the 5A seems to have a brighter treble with more of an attack and its bass is boomier in the sense that it doesn't seems as well contained as the 8A but still very good nonetheless. I personally prefer the 8A's sound signature but that's down to personal preference. But I was quite amazed at how the 5A sounds so similar to the JH16 rather than the 8A (in the sense that the treble and bass seem boosted whereas the 8A has equal emphasis on the midrange)....

 

I think it would be misleading to think of the 5A as a universal version of the 8A but rather a unique IEM in its own right which still sounds fantastic!


Edited by uchihaitachi - 4/27/13 at 3:58pm
post #6741 of 7980
Quote:
Originally Posted by Duncan View Post

Sorry if this has been covered a hundred times before, can I check though, the cable - is it swappable with Westone cables?

 

Thanks :)

 

Yes, they are the Westone type sockets. 

post #6742 of 7980
Quote:
Originally Posted by uchihaitachi View Post

The 8A seems to have a slightly more laid back treble with less of an attack and its bass is more controlled albeit more powerful. But the 5A seems to have a brighter treble with more of an attack and its bass is boomier in the sense that it doesn't seems as well contained as the 8A but still very good nonetheless. I personally prefer the 8A's sound signature but that's down to personal preference. But I was quite amazed at how the 5A sounds so similar to the JH16 rather than the 8A (in the sense that the treble and bass seem boosted whereas the 8A has equal emphasis on the midrange)....

 

I don't think it would be misleading to think of the 5A as a universal version of the 8A but rather a unique IEM in its own right.

 

Maybe it was the seal? I'm guessing some tip rolling could potentially tighten up the bass, and if you use foam tips the treble may smooth out some. *shrug* 

post #6743 of 7980

I had perfect seal with the 5A. too tight in my opinion lol

post #6744 of 7980

Hey uchihaitachi! You said that you could listen to Tzar 350 too. Would you share your impressions?

post #6745 of 7980

I have the Tzar 350, but only have the Sony XBA4 to compare against...

 

...The Tzar sounds a little flat compared to the Sony (hey, no surprise there, it is supposed to be the reference / linear sounding range anyway!), takes a few moments to get used to - however, I think I'm slowly becoming addicted to the sound - very good :D

 

...Only thing that disappoints me is the 3.5mm jack, having a thick square of plastic means that I cannot use these with my HTC (which is a good combination) with its case on, so am using an old Denon extension cable, which makes the cable about 3ft too long :(

post #6746 of 7980
Quote:
Originally Posted by Duncan View Post

I have the Tzar 350, but only have the Sony XBA4 to compare against...

 

...The Tzar sounds a little flat compared to the Sony (hey, no surprise there, it is supposed to be the reference / linear sounding range anyway!), takes a few moments to get used to - however, I think I'm slowly becoming addicted to the sound - very good :D

 

...Only thing that disappoints me is the 3.5mm jack, having a thick square of plastic means that I cannot use these with my HTC (which is a good combination) with its case on, so am using an old Denon extension cable, which makes the cable about 3ft too long :(

Would love to hear more about that. Not like comparing but a general review.

post #6747 of 7980
Quote:
Originally Posted by Greed View Post

Maybe it was the seal? I'm guessing some tip rolling could potentially tighten up the bass, and if you use foam tips the treble may smooth out some. *shrug* 
This was my experience. I could get a tight seal with many tips (was generally very tight) but with long Comply tips the treble is smooth and still plenty extended and the bass is really amazing but never boomy at all. I did experience both boomy bass ans harsh highs with some other tips.
I also found, as others did, that the mids start out feeling recessed but eventually became well balanced.
post #6748 of 7980
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ultimate Mango View Post


This was my experience. I could get a tight seal with many tips (was generally very tight) but with long Comply tips the treble is smooth and still plenty extended and the bass is really amazing but never boomy at all. I did experience both boomy bass ans harsh highs with some other tips.
I also found, as others did, that the mids start out feeling recessed but eventually became well balanced.

Is this for the 5A or the Tzar 350? I assume the 5A as you talk about a strong bass. I think boomy is a wrong word I used. I thought the bass was powerful and had impact but just lacked refinement in comparison to the 8A (still very good and reaching perfection, but not just there yet :p)

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by AmberOzL View Post

Would love to hear more about that. Not like comparing but a general review.

The Tzar was a very interesting experience. I specifically brought along the rendition 1 and the Cowon J3 with different types of recordings; lossy and lossless files that are mastered well and some that are not mastered so well.

 

At first, I was not so impressed. Coming from the 8A, I thought its bass was practically non existent. Started off listening to lossy recordings and just wow, they sounded spectacularly abhorrent. Moved on to lossless recordings that are not mastered so well and this was equally shall we say, another painful experience. Moving on to well mastered lossless recordings, the Tzar 350 came to life. It is just so incredibly full of detail. It makes you feel as if you are in the studio while the jazz singer is crooning away. The reproduced sound is exactly as it would sound in a real live recording studio.

 

Listening to solo cello pieces as well as solo piano pieces, every tiny nuance and detail came to life. In the piano performance, I could hear all the harmonics, pedalling (I can rarely hear brief uses of the sustaining pedal or the soft pedal but I could on the Tzar) and the pianist panting/groaning in the recording. For the solo cello performance, I could hear again, tiny details that I didn't even know were in the recording (when the cellist's fingers are sweaty, and he takes off the finger on the string, there is an ever so slight vibration in the cello string. Well I could hear that too, as well as minute unevenness in the cellist's bowing).

 

The Tzar 350 really is as the Wizard puts it, for 'Tuxedo listening' sessions. For me, it is just far too flat and analytical for listening to pieces with the objective of being swept along in a sonic tornado. Listening to say Ravel's La Valse on the 8A is just quite extraordinary. On the Tzar 350, so intensely boring. Yet if you enjoy listening to solo performances and hearing every little nuance, the Tzar easily trumps the 8A and the 4Ai. I was planning on purchasing it and having listened to it, I have definitely been won over. It really isn't for everyone, or for general listening at all. A lot of genres of music will sound bad on the Tzars. But listening to instrumental solo recordings on the Tzars brought me a whole new level of enjoyment and appreciation to all the artists, as their focus on musical and technical details are really brought to light thanks to the Tzars. (As well as their flaws :p)


Edited by uchihaitachi - 4/27/13 at 4:39pm
post #6749 of 7980
Quote:
Originally Posted by uchihaitachi View Post

IThe Tzar was a very interesting experience. I specifically brought along the rendition 1 and the Cowon J3 with different types of recordings; lossy and lossless files that are mastered well and some that are not mastered so well.

 

At first, I was not so impressed. Coming from the 8A, I thought its bass was practically non existent. Started off listening to lossy recordings and just wow, they sounded spectacularly abhorrent. Moved on to lossless recordings that are not mastered so well and this was equally shall we say, another painful experience. Moving on to well mastered lossless recordings, the Tzar 350 came to life. It is just so incredibly full of detail. It makes you feel as if you are in the studio while the jazz singer is crooning away. The reproduced sound is exactly as it would sound in a real live recording studio.

 

Listening to solo cello pieces as well as solo piano pieces, every tiny nuance and detail came to life. In the piano performance, I could hear all the harmonics, pedalling (I can rarely hear brief uses of the sustaining pedal or the soft pedal but I could on the Tzar) and the pianist panting/groaning in the recording. For the solo cello performance, I could hear again, tiny details that I didn't even know were in the recording (when the cellist's fingers are sweaty, and he takes off the finger on the string, there is an ever so slight vibration in the cello string. Well I could hear that too, as well as minute unevenness in the cellist's bowing).

 

The Tzar 350 really is as the Wizard puts it, for 'Tuxedo listening' sessions. For me, it is just far too flat and analytical for listening to pieces with the objective of being swept along in a sonic tornado. Listening to say Ravel's La Valse on the 8A is just quite extraordinary. On the Tzar 350, so intensely boring. Yet if you enjoy listening to solo performances and hearing every little nuance, the Tzar easily trumps the 8A and the 4Ai. I was planning on purchasing it and having listened to it, I have definitely been won over. It really isn't for everyone, or for general listening at all. A lot of genres of music will sound bad on the Tzars. But listening to instrumental solo recordings on the Tzars brought me a whole new level of enjoyment and appreciation to all the artists, as their focus on musical and technical details are really brought to light thanks to the Tzars. (As well as their flaws :p)

Thanks mate! I have been looking for a detail monster and perfect reproducing of sound. More I read about Tzar350 the more I put money on savings pot smily_headphones1.gif I got that it is not just IEM itself, I will also need a wonderful DAP and AMP. What Heir offers as a bundle seems the best solution. AK100 + Tzar350.. I might lose the track of sanity and pull the trigger for Rendition 1 too since it has also a discount if you purchase it with iem/ciem.

 

Now I have to be a nice boy and put some money aside for this unique bundle. Once again, thanks a lot.


Edited by AmberOzL - 4/27/13 at 8:39pm
post #6750 of 7980
Quote:
Originally Posted by uchihaitachi View Post

Is this for the 5A or the Tzar 350? I assume the 5A as you talk about a strong bass. I think boomy is a wrong word I used. I thought the bass was powerful and had impact but just lacked refinement in comparison to the 8A (still very good and reaching perfection, but not just there yet :p)

 

The Tzar was a very interesting experience. I specifically brought along the rendition 1 and the Cowon J3 with different types of recordings; lossy and lossless files that are mastered well and some that are not mastered so well.

 

At first, I was not so impressed. Coming from the 8A, I thought its bass was practically non existent. Started off listening to lossy recordings and just wow, they sounded spectacularly abhorrent. Moved on to lossless recordings that are not mastered so well and this was equally shall we say, another painful experience. Moving on to well mastered lossless recordings, the Tzar 350 came to life. It is just so incredibly full of detail. It makes you feel as if you are in the studio while the jazz singer is crooning away. The reproduced sound is exactly as it would sound in a real live recording studio.

 

Listening to solo cello pieces as well as solo piano pieces, every tiny nuance and detail came to life. In the piano performance, I could hear all the harmonics, pedalling (I can rarely hear brief uses of the sustaining pedal or the soft pedal but I could on the Tzar) and the pianist panting/groaning in the recording. For the solo cello performance, I could hear again, tiny details that I didn't even know were in the recording (when the cellist's fingers are sweaty, and he takes off the finger on the string, there is an ever so slight vibration in the cello string. Well I could hear that too, as well as minute unevenness in the cellist's bowing).

 

The Tzar 350 really is as the Wizard puts it, for 'Tuxedo listening' sessions. For me, it is just far too flat and analytical for listening to pieces with the objective of being swept along in a sonic tornado. Listening to say Ravel's La Valse on the 8A is just quite extraordinary. On the Tzar 350, so intensely boring. Yet if you enjoy listening to solo performances and hearing every little nuance, the Tzar easily trumps the 8A and the 4Ai. I was planning on purchasing it and having listened to it, I have definitely been won over. It really isn't for everyone, or for general listening at all. A lot of genres of music will sound bad on the Tzars. But listening to instrumental solo recordings on the Tzars brought me a whole new level of enjoyment and appreciation to all the artists, as their focus on musical and technical details are really brought to light thanks to the Tzars. (As well as their flaws :p)

 

 

      Honestly, you nailed this product in both sonic descriptions and in the description of the mission/product goal of the Tar 350.   I knew from the begining, it would not be for everyone, but if one is looking for an IEM that offers a festival of details, the Tzar 350 sets the bar.

Dr. John Moulton

Here at Noble, we craft some of the finest universal and custom in-ear monitors available today. 

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