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Shure SRH1840 and SRH1440 Unveiled! - Page 118

post #1756 of 2005

As a matter of interest who here specifically notices the distortion that the SRH1440 has with frequencies below 100hz? I can't speak for the 1840 but I actually had my pair shipped for testing under warranty just on the off-chance that there was something wrong. Apparently several techs tested with sine-waves and couldn't hear anything strange. I even brought a 50hz sine clip on my mp3 player into the store I purchased the 1440's from (a local instrument and music shop), it was the weirdest thing when three different staff members couldn't hear what was clearly obvious distortion to my ears. I even tried A ->B testing between my old AD700's and the shures "So can you hear that these headphones have a less distorted sine wave especially in the right ear?" "Sorry it sounds the same to me."

 

Ok so I am only 25 and I've always made an effort to look after my hearing but all the same I expected at least someone to notice this distortion too. Not that I'm really complaining as this effect is only noticeable in a small percentage of what I listen to,  tracks with hard hitting pure bass that is separate from other frequencies in the mix certain trance and dubstep tracks mostly. All the same, it was an eyeopener for me that people could not 'hear' a certain details that were just so obvious to me especially when these people clearly played and had an appreciation for music themselves.

post #1757 of 2005
Quote:
Originally Posted by J-a-k-e View Post

As a matter of interest who here specifically notices the distortion that the SRH1440 has with frequencies below 100hz? I can't speak for the 1840 but I actually had my pair shipped for testing under warranty just on the off-chance that there was something wrong. Apparently several techs tested with sine-waves and couldn't hear anything strange. I even brought a 50hz sine clip on my mp3 player into the store I purchased the 1440's from (a local instrument and music shop), it was the weirdest thing when three different staff members couldn't hear what was clearly obvious distortion to my ears. I even tried A ->B testing between my old AD700's and the shures "So can you hear that these headphones have a less distorted sine wave especially in the right ear?" "Sorry it sounds the same to me."

 

Ok so I am only 25 and I've always made an effort to look after my hearing but all the same I expected at least someone to notice this distortion too. Not that I'm really complaining as this effect is only noticeable in a small percentage of what I listen to,  tracks with hard hitting pure bass that is separate from other frequencies in the mix certain trance and dubstep tracks mostly. All the same, it was an eyeopener for me that people could not 'hear' a certain details that were just so obvious to me especially when these people clearly played and had an appreciation for music themselves.

 

On my SRH 1840, the first few bars of "Rock You Gently" from Jennifer Warnes' "The Hunter" album will make this bass defect stand out.  Anybody who listens to this track on the Shure and compares it to a Sennheiser HD580/600/650/800 (or similar mid to high-end headphone) will immediately notice the difference.

post #1758 of 2005

Read asr's mini-review: http://www.head-fi.org/t/617007/mini-review-shure-srh1840

 

asr mentioned a few flaws with the SRH1840 him among them were:

 

- Treble not very clean.
- Lack of a totally black/silent "background".
- Tendency to sound semi-blurry on very complex music, notably densely-packed ambient electronica and very busy thrash metal, especially at high volume.

- Slow impulse response that blurred over very fast note sequences.

 

The above is what people are talking about when they are referring to the specific distortion characteristics of the SRH1840. Distortion does not necessary sound like something clipping, warbling, buzzing, etc. It usually manifests as poor fidelity blurry sound which lacks clarity and articulation. Sometimes it manifests as thickness or reinforcement, especially if its 2nd order and in the bass.


Edited by purrin - 9/16/12 at 1:17pm
post #1759 of 2005

He also said this:

 

"I'm going to put it this way: the SRH1840 is probably the single best all-round dynamic headphone I've heard this year, or any year! Seriously folks, and I'm not just saying this to be snarky or for humorous effect, or to overhype it. If there's anything I want to do on purpose, I want to get on the hype train and make it worse. The SRH1840 is the most amazing full-size open dynamic headphone package that's probably ever been made, and I couldn't be more enthusiastic about it. It's awesome, amazing, and an absolute must-buy for anyone whose budget is up to HD800-level ($1.5K)!"

 

Why do we look to point out the negatives and be so critical on things all the time.  How about just enjoying the headphones if it fits your tastes with your music of choice.

 

I happend to enjoy listing to these headphones more so than the HD800s at times when I want to chill out and relax.  

 

I guess I'm just not that much of a critical person to go looking for flaws.  If it does not stand out right away 

 

(beats) then I may me able to deal with it.

post #1760 of 2005

You don't really have to go look for flaws when you're just not hearing the things in your music you're expecting to be. They become apparent automatically. 

post #1761 of 2005
Quote:
Originally Posted by WilCox View Post

 

On my SRH 1840, the first few bars of "Rock You Gently" from Jennifer Warnes' "The Hunter" album will make this bass defect stand out.  Anybody who listens to this track on the Shure and compares it to a Sennheiser HD580/600/650/800 (or similar mid to high-end headphone) will immediately notice the difference.

 

I have only heard the 1440 but am told the driver's back end is covered, as it is on the 1440. You can see the covering through the rear screen. This is a very unorthodox design, where the headphone is actually "open", but the driver back is capped, which wards off leakage out the back, I guess. I am wondering if this covering of the driver is actually choking off the air required for low bass response, i.e. the driver does not "breathe" properly. Perhaps this is similar to blocking a port on a loudspeaker. I have put 20 and 30hZ tones through the 1440 and they do sound choked off at higher volume levels. Mind you, some other of my large headphones (HE300, Pioneer SE-A1000) also choke on the low tones and their drivers are not capped in the back. Also, if the driver is not in a secure non-resonant housing, it will just vibrate and not produce the low tone.

 

I can hear the lower registers on the 1440 but I listen at moderate volumes. And with normal music listening, I don't hear any specific distortions on the 1440. If I don't hear excessive sibilance, quacky midrange or boomy bass, I'm usually a happy listener.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by preproman View Post

He also said this:

 

"I'm going to put it this way: the SRH1840 is probably the single best all-round dynamic headphone I've heard this year, or any year! Seriously folks, and I'm not just saying this to be snarky or for humorous effect, or to overhype it. If there's anything I want to do on purpose, I want to get on the hype train and make it worse. The SRH1840 is the most amazing full-size open dynamic headphone package that's probably ever been made, and I couldn't be more enthusiastic about it. It's awesome, amazing, and an absolute must-buy for anyone whose budget is up to HD800-level ($1.5K)!"

 

Why do we look to point out the negatives and be so critical on things all the time.  How about just enjoying the headphones if it fits your tastes with your music of choice.

 

Indeed.

 

I guess some people figure that if the "flaws" are not pointed out, we won't get "better" headphones down the road. 

post #1762 of 2005
Quote:
Originally Posted by electropop View Post

You don't really have to go look for flaws when you're just not hearing the things in your music you're expecting to be. They become apparent automatically. 

 

 

I guess you didn't see this.

 

"How about just enjoying the headphones if it fits your tastes with your music of choice."

post #1763 of 2005

In spite of the flaws in the SRH1840, I find it very enjoyable and I'm happy with my purchase.  People should recognize that no headphone is perfect, but if they do a good job in connecting you with the music, then just relax, enjoy and forget your worries. normal_smile%20.gif

post #1764 of 2005
Quote:
Originally Posted by preproman View Post

 

 

I guess you didn't see this.

 

"How about just enjoying the headphones if it fits your tastes with your music of choice."

 

I did. Tastes are fine, as long as people admit liking poorer performance. Some here are extremely discerning and I value that kind of an opinion much more than the typical subjective "This headphone is good, at least I personally think so".

 

Not making a statement of the product here, since I've heard neither in question. Just can't understand the comment about trying to focus on the good qualities only. That just feeds the hype. And headphones this expensive don't deserve any undeserved hype. Makes much more sense when you have both camps here making a statement and it's much more enjoyable to read. 

post #1765 of 2005
Quote:
Originally Posted by electropop View Post

 

Just can't understand the comment about trying to focus on the good qualities only. 

 

 

Point me to where this comment was made?  wink_face.gif

post #1766 of 2005
Quote:
Originally Posted by WilCox View Post

On my SRH 1840, the first few bars of "Rock You Gently" from Jennifer Warnes' "The Hunter" album will make this bass defect stand out.  Anybody who listens to this track on the Shure and compares it to a Sennheiser HD580/600/650/800 (or similar mid to high-end headphone) will immediately notice the difference.

 

Two of the many test tracks I use for all my ABs as well.

post #1767 of 2005
Quote:
Originally Posted by preproman View Post

He also said this:

 

Why do we look to point out the negatives and be so critical on things all the time.  How about just enjoying the headphones if it fits your tastes with your music of choice.

 

It's not that I'm being critical for the sake of being negative. (It should be noted that I did link asr's review and that my reply was specific to the poster's observation on distortion.) As I've said for the tenth time, MF, who I consider a good friend, likes them. And as I've said for the twentieth time, the SRH1840 has great quality not commonly seen in many of today's headphones: lack of treble resonances and ringing (it's doesn't take measurements to figure that out either.) It would be nice if I didn't have to preclude those positives every time I posted something.

 

What it comes down to is a matter of sonic priorities. I completely with asr's observations. However, my conclusion of them is rather different than his because we have different priorities. There are showstopper criteria which I personally feel need to be met for a $600 headphone. Mainly that it is competent with extended bass reproduction, and that it doesn't have levels of distortion (i.e., blurriness, lack of clarity, etc.) approaching that an ibud. 

 

I see the SRH1840 as a rip-off because IMO the HE400, HD558, HD598, HD600, HD650, K701, Q701, SRH840, ATH-M50, V-Moda M80, and SA5000 [all headphones which I've own(ed) or had for several months in my possession] are better sounding headphones for less than half the money. The ESP950 which sometimes can be found for $600, has similar sweet treble qualities, but is better in every other way (and it also includes an amp).

 

However, I totally understand how those who appreciate the sweetness of the SRH1840's treble may seduced by its charms. If this headphone were $300, I'd have a lot less negative to say about it and probably sing its praises.


Edited by purrin - 9/16/12 at 2:43pm
post #1768 of 2005
Quote:
Originally Posted by purrin View Post

 

It's not that I'm being critical for the sake of being negative. (It should be noted that I did link asr's review and that my reply was specific to the poster's observation on distortion.) As I've said for the tenth time, MF, who I consider a good friend, likes them. And as I've said for the twentieth time, the SRH1840 has great quality not commonly seen in many of today's headphones: lack of treble resonances and ringing (it's doesn't take measurements to figure that out either.) It would be nice if I didn't have to preclude those positives every time I posted something.

 

What it comes down to is a matter of sonic priorities. I completely with asr's observations. However, my conclusion of them is rather different than his because we have different priorities. There are showstopper criteria which I personally feel need to be met for a $600 headphone. Mainly that it is competent with extended bass reproduction, and that it doesn't have levels of distortion (i.e., blurriness, lack of clarity, etc.) approach that an ibud. 

 

I see the SRH1840 as a rip-off because IMO the HE400, HD558, HD598, HD600, HD650, K701, Q701, SRH840, ATH-M50, V-Moda M80, and SA5000 [all headphones which I've own(ed) or had for several months in my possession] are better sounding headphones for less than half the money. The ESP950 which sometimes can be found for $600, has similar sweet treble qualities, but is better in every other way (and it also includes an amp).

 

However, I totally understand how those who appreciate the sweetness of the SRH1840's treble may seduced by its charms. If this headphone were $300, I'd have a lot less negative to say about it and probably sing its praises.

 

Interestingly, I own or have owned most of those and have the exact opposite opinion. We must have very different priorities.

post #1769 of 2005
Quote:

Originally Posted by purrin View Post

 

I see the SRH1840 as a rip-off because IMO the HE400, HD558, HD598, HD600, HD650, K701, Q701, SRH840, ATH-M50, V-Moda M80, and SA5000 [all headphones which I've own(ed) or had for several months in my possession] are better sounding headphones for less than half the money. 

 

Fine. Others don't. 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Shahrose View Post

 

Interestingly, I own or have owned most of those and have the exact opposite opinion. We must have very different priorities.

 

Different tastes, different criteria for good sound, different ways that we react to and enjoy music. 

post #1770 of 2005
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shahrose View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by purrin View Post

 

I see the SRH1840 as a rip-off because IMO the HE400, HD558, HD598, HD600, HD650, K701, Q701, SRH840, ATH-M50, V-Moda M80, and SA5000 [all headphones which I've own(ed) or had for several months in my possession] are better sounding headphones for less than half the money. The ESP950 which sometimes can be found for $600, has similar sweet treble qualities, but is better in every other way (and it also includes an amp).

 

Interestingly, I own or have owned most of those and have the exact opposite opinion. We must have very different priorities.

 

x2. I will say that I didn't like them that much at first (the sound seemed to lack body, and they came across as notably recessed), but they have grown on me quite a bit.

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