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post #31 of 38

Thrift shops and pawn shops are also great places to get used cds. I picked up twelve classical cds the other month for only ten bucks at one of these places. Ripped them onto the computer and relaxed with my Koss Pro4AA headphones for the rest of the evening.

 

Yes the times they are a changing but the more things change the more they stay the same usually for the better.


Edited by Hellbishop - 12/6/11 at 9:02pm
post #32 of 38

I thought people liked MP3's or downloaded music because they.

1. Only listen to music in their cars or exercising with a MP3 player.

2. Don't buy music at all and like free music

3. Just want a song and it can be had for 99 cents or free.

 

Otherwise than that it's always been a worthless format why would anyone pay the same or often times more for some files than having the real deal?

 

In 2010 CDs sold 326 million (brand new) units in North America there really going to pull the plug on that? And that's just North America and USA printed releases not counting a lot imports Made In Germany discs that account for a lot of music of older bands,reissue stuff,classical etc..

Sure they would like to sell more.

But a lot of people don't buy music or very little. A lot of people don't even listen to music.

 

I don't think it's possible to kill off CD or any psychical format that has succeeded without music labels killing themselves.

And how could they kill off CD? Vinyl you hear ohh it's coming back in 2010 in North America 2.8 million vinyls were sold

2.8 million to 326 million and they are getting rid of CD?

 

Another poster on another website said this very well.

 

 

deckeda said

 

The labels' aversion to a specific format, due to them only wanting one format to distribute.

Prerecorded cassettes took forever to gain traction but once they did, thanks to the Walkman and more decent choices in cassette decks and boomboxes ... LPs were finally threatened. CDs would have overtaken them all sooner but for price.

The situation is now reversed, and LPs have cost more than CDs for several years, and yet still are largely ignored by labels, despite the obvious advantages to the labels of offering and [most importantly] promoting LPs. One lesson among many they've failed to grasp.

You've got a chicken-or-egg proposition here. CD sales are down, way down, and yet still high enough to be really, really important. Nevertheless, labels WILL kill the sick patient rather than resuscitate, just as they yanked LPs from the racks when LPs began slumping in the late '80s, thus creating even fewer sales to the point of extinction. Effect, meet cause. See also: self-fullfulling prophesy.

 

And another poster said this

 

ack said

 

I agree.  There is no way people are going to buy into a new format en masse.   Many older people will even now feel burnt by the way the industry handled the move to the CD format. 

I really doubt in a digital world the music industry will ever find another generation of listeners gullible enough to chunk their entire music collection and replace all their music for a new format the way people traded in their vinyl albums for CDs.

I understand that new sales were even higher back then when this was going on but it is all related. 

In the nineties as people were buying CDs of all the old stuff they had on LPs previously they were forced for the most part to go into a physical store and actually see new releases on the shelf.  People bought a lot of new stuff from Tower or whatever because they were already there to replace their old stuff and the new stuff was right there in their face.


Edited by mibutenma - 12/6/11 at 10:01pm
post #33 of 38

Labels don't have as much leverage as they used to. The Cowboy Junkies for example have started their own online distribution site since they escaped their contract with Geffen Records a decade or so ago. Now that they are label-free their creativity and productivity has exploded. Their website, latentrecordings.com, has free streaming of new albums, as well as lossy and lossless downloads and CDs and LPs available for order. They have their entire catalog available, and have even signed up eight other bands to their online independent party. This is hopefully the wave of the future and the big label's worst nightmare. All these labels can do in response is to create and promote their own new "talent" like Miley Cyrus and Justin Beiber.

post #34 of 38

I doubt CD will entirely go away.  The big expense is stocking them in stores.  We'll probably have to order them online from a central warehouse.

 

Though I do agree that production will drop off.

 

And, being a grouchy old guy, I don't care much if new music isn't on CD.  The vast majority of what I enjoy is already on CD or vinyl.  If anything, I'll flesh out the collection with used discs.  I know I can keep m turntable spinning for the rest of my life, but Inwonder what the availabilty of CD players will be like.  Most audiophile brands buy transports from big manufacturers.

 

Or maybe I should stockpile four or five good players.

post #35 of 38

A lot of the CDs I buy are released by smaller, independently owned record labels. I really doubt good music on CD format is going to suddenly vanish by the end of 2012.

post #36 of 38

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Uncle Erik View Post

I doubt CD will entirely go away.  The big expense is stocking them in stores.  We'll probably have to order them online from a central warehouse.

 

Though I do agree that production will drop off.

 

And, being a grouchy old guy, I don't care much if new music isn't on CD.  The vast majority of what I enjoy is already on CD or vinyl.  If anything, I'll flesh out the collection with used discs.  I know I can keep m turntable spinning for the rest of my life, but Inwonder what the availabilty of CD players will be like.  Most audiophile brands buy transports from big manufacturers.

 

Or maybe I should stockpile four or five good players.

 

Rip it to a lossless format, stash it, and forget it, that's what I say re CDs.

post #37 of 38

Cds won't be completely extinct, recording labels will definitely cut back on production but the format will always be available. I still purchase cds regularly when I hear something that I like.

post #38 of 38

i am a professional dj and do all the trance nation cds and believe me this will not happen and i don't know were you heard this from but it's wrong?

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