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Why does it matter if headphones have a frequency range below 20Hz and above 20kHz? - Page 4

post #46 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by SilentFrequency View Post

Is it true then that the frequencies you can't hear, you can sometimes feel?

I listen to House and EDM music and my Steez Effects headphones have 

Frequency 6 - 28,000 Hz

 

And I get chills down my spine when I'm listening to it on the go.

post #47 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by hankypanky2 View Post
 

I listen to House and EDM music and my Steez Effects headphones have 

Frequency 6 - 28,000 Hz

 

And I get chills down my spine when I'm listening to it on the go.

 

That has to do with the interaction of your cognitive processes and what you hear, with the hypothalamus, not necessarily what you don't hear (or sub bass, or anything). I get shivers like that when I hear the sound of a brush on canvas. It's subjective emotional response and physiological arousal at a low level, triggering the hypothalamus --> adrenaline. 

*shrug*  people are funny. 


Edited by liamstrain - 12/1/14 at 7:33am
post #48 of 54
Maybe musics human emotional responses delivered by whatever method just can't be measured objectively?
post #49 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by hankypanky2 View Post
 

I listen to House and EDM music and my Steez Effects headphones have 

Frequency 6 - 28,000 Hz

 

 

That is half a response rating. Without the +/- dB part it doesn't mean a whole heck of a lot.

post #50 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by bigshot View Post
 

 

That is half a response rating. Without the +/- dB part it doesn't mean a whole heck of a lot.

Exactly - it means nothing. Anything can be made to vibrate at any frequency, therefore anything can have a near-infinite frequency response.

What matters is how flat it is.

post #51 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by hankypanky2 View Post
 
Frequency 6 - 28,000 Hz


My favorite example of this kind of frequency response spec is Grado. As you move up their product range, they advertise a larger and larger range of frequencies, from 20 - 20,000 on the SR60 to 5 - 50,000 on the PS1000. The actual extension is virtually the same. Both are down to about -40 dB at 20 Hz and -35 dB at 20 kHz. And neither is exactly linear at any frequency. It's even more controversial because they've always been rumored to use the same drivers throughout most of their product line, and indeed the SR225 measures nearly identical to the PS1000 when equipped with the same pads.

 

If you still think this spec means anything after seeing that, you're being silly.

post #52 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by Head Injury View Post


My favorite example of this kind of frequency response spec is Grado. As you move up their product range, they advertise a larger and larger range of frequencies, from 20 - 20,000 on the SR60 to 5 - 50,000 on the PS1000. The actual extension is virtually the same. Both are down to about -40 dB at 20 Hz and -35 dB at 20 kHz. And neither is exactly linear at any frequency. It's even more controversial because they've always been rumored to use the same drivers throughout most of their product line, and indeed the SR225 measures nearly identical to the PS1000 when equipped with the same pads.

If you still think this spec means anything after seeing that, you're being silly.

I actually checked pricing of the two Grado headphones you mentioned and they are totally different in a major way.

So basically if you purchased the SR225, they sound the same as the PS1000?
post #53 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by SilentFrequency View Post


I actually checked pricing of the two Grado headphones you mentioned and they are totally different in a major way.

So basically if you purchased the SR225, they sound the same as the PS1000?

 

When you put on the same pads, they get close. Grado's argument is they use drivers which match each other better, as you go up the tiers, as well as tuning in the cups. I happen to prefer the RS1s over my older 225's - but they are very similar sounding headphones. 

post #54 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by liamstrain View Post

When you put on the same pads, they get close. Grado's argument is they use drivers which match each other better, as you go up the tiers, as well as tuning in the cups. I happen to prefer the RS1s over my older 225's - but they are very similar sounding headphones. 

Wow, I'm really surprised that the price difference does not correlate with the sound of the headphones you mention but I guess maybe they sound different enough for some to choose the more expensive model.
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