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Who still has the Sony SA5000? - Page 32

post #466 of 600

I'm defintely loving the SA5K's out of the Bottlehead Crack's 120Zout. Not as airy as from the Obj2 0Zout but there's some really nice pRaT going on, and the clarity still amazes with some good recordings, i.e Peace Orchestra. Bass is surprisingly good as well, I think it actually has some more balls than with all other SS that i've tried, possible w/excpetion of the AT-HA5000. But it's a really nice combo, almost making me regret going all out with Stax and such... almost. redface.gif

post #467 of 600
Originally Posted by maxmays1 View Post

"1500mw is the amount of power the sa5000 can handle at its nominal ohm level before distortion. all headphones (drivers for that matter) have a rated power level, wether its listed in specs or not. mw being milliwatt= 1000ths of a watt. Correct me if i'm wrong. "

Quote:
"You are indeed wrong. redface.gif

 

First we should assume that 1.5W/ch spec is thermal limiting, as in 1.5W/ch or greater will fuse the voicecoil (which sounds about right, given how thin the wires are, and how small the driver is). Not "amount of power before distortion" - it'll be distorting pretty terribly well before that point though, because the driver will be moving pretty dramatically (higher excursion = higher distortion), and you may hit Xmax or cook the driver off before 1.5W (because Sony is so vague on their specs - 1.5W could be an instantaneous value, or a peak value, or a thermal limit, but I'll tell you almost certainly is NOT a continuous limit, and it does not mean a zero distortion limit; further indication can be gleaned from the THD measurements that Tyll did - it rises pretty aggressively when he dumped more power into them).

----------------------

Quote:
Regarding the "they are bright due to undercutting power" - I don't think so. They're a bright headphone no matter what. The bass is very good though - one of the tightest and dryest dynamics I've ever heard, it just isn't very impactful. I mean yes, in principle what you're saying there is correct, but you'd be talking about an amplifier that delivers so little power (we're talking less than a fraction of a mW at clipping - most preamp outputs can beat that) in order to reproduce what you're describing. I just don't think you'd find that out in the wild (honestly the amplifiers they put into mobile phones these days can usually deliver at least 10mW/channel, which is so much more than the SA5000 would ever need)."

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I think you may have over judged my statement. I never said 1500mw was the nominal rating, i stated that, that power can be produced at it's Nominal OHM level being 70ohms. As you may very well know these power ratings are not measured through out an entire frequency ranged but at a standard 1khz test level. I am of the understanding that most companies only list there peak power level oppose the the nominal power level which is almost always 25-75% of its max in some cases even less, but in terms of the SA5ks i doubt your paying a premium to only get less than 25% of its max power level. 1500mw is without a question the 100% load rating, and when it comes driving components or anything for that matter, it should never be done at 100% load, that's basic practice. So even if your amplifier is producing 1500mw or more it shouldn't be a problem if your utilizing it at 25-75% load. The problem i see is that you can probably produce reasonable sounding power at 30-60ohms but creating its rated power at the 70ohm level is a much more challenging task. Same thing with that of the K701 and HD 650's is to create suitable power at its given ohm rating. Most problems with speaker set ups is that 50% output load is not equal to 50% power rating of the drivers, and it seems like with these high clarity SA5ks and other Sony's alike making this vary apparent in the form of brightness and impurity notification instead of clipping and distortion. But you stated undercutting power may be a wrong way of looking at it, it could simply be they are bright and thats all there is to it. I have my doubts because the ex-1000's i have, seem to be have a similar problem.

 

Quote:
compared to what other headphones?

Compared to something like the K701 or HD 650. The SA5000 are *very* easily driven, and *very* unpicky (the K701 are picky because they need something like 1.5mW/ch, and the HD 650 because their impedance plot looks like Kingda-Ka).

 

I can see how the k701 can be pickier simply because it has a much smaller window of power requirement with a similar ohm rating (62 ohms). It creates its nominal power level at almost a third of what the SA5ks do.On the contrary it is probably much easier to over power the k701's as well?

 

Speaking on in terms of the Senn's, these have a much higher impedance so creating power in its nominal range can be a trick as well for reasons you know of. Same for any other high impedance driver.

 

 

Quote:
However, this doesn't mean they're all sunshine and rainbows (just because your Fischer Price Speak And Spell can drive them doesn't mean it *should*) - because they're very sensitive, and because Sony actually put some time and thought into building them right, they're absolutely revealing of channel imbalance and noise on the part of the amplifier or volume control section of whatever they're hooked into. This means that noisy wipers, cheap pots, etc will all come through clear as crystal. They will also let you know about your amp's noise floor unless it's relatively low. So amp selection is somewhat important for headphones like this as well - not because you need a lot of power (or the perennial favorite "lots of current"), or some magical zero ohm output impedance (for a "high overall DF" (ha!)); but because if you get a pot that gives you that "rustling leaves" thing, changing the volume is really annoying. And if the pot doesn't track L/R together across the lower half of it's range, you will probably always be annoyed by the mismatch (and because they're so sensitive, you usually are using the "beginning" of the pot's range, which is usually where the mismatches occur). And if you think you're just gonna drop the signal going into whatever flimsy amp, and then run its output up, you'll probably pick up a lot of noise (white noise, RF, whatever - it's random), which they'll let you know about too.

This is why I couldn't stand the FiiO E9 with them. It's a fine amp, especially for something higher Z and darker like the HD 580, or less sensitive, like the K701, but for the SA5000 it's an exercise in annoyance.
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So with the Fiio E9 is it not the case your undercutting power? I have the same problem with my Sony EX-1000 which sounds to be similar to the sa5000 in driver design(not in layout as they are completely different design). When i undercut power using a less powerful source(phone,media player, computer output), yes it will play loud, but it has a very piercing and distorted high frequency response,with little to no mids/bass, oppose to when driven on my Nuforce HDP or Schiit Asgaurd they sound almost perfect in the 35-75% load, but still has a hint of distortion around 75-100% power load, this piercing distortion in the higher frequency range seems similar to that of the problem i have when using the less powerful source outputs at 75-100% load, which sounds like and undercutting of power, oppose to peak power distortion/clipping, as i do not hear much clipping around the mids and lows but rather only in the high HZ level which is not indicative to over loading.

 

In all practices it is said you should make your peak performance at 25-75% load(and an even smaller window if you are looking for extreme efficiency) not at 75-100%, which in some cases when you undercut power you have to use your components at 75-100% to get a suitable listening level. In this zone you are most likely in the clipping and distortion level, but with some drivers and speaker designs clipping and distortion may not be so noticeable, or annoying enough to care. Unlike with these extremely detailed Sony's it is stated by many that you can hear the slightest impurities be it undercutting or over powering or crappy source input. This holds true for the Ex-1000 's as well, meaning Sony has designed something much more intelligent than users make out to be, and most likely the high frequency sensitivity issue could be a cause of under powering? yes i can understand the principle of it being "bright no matter what" but in some cases most people can take that as being piercing if you have sensitive ears, and a lot of people do(which isn't a bad thing).

 

Quote:

Because they're sensitive, but also have relatively large drivers (this means low excursion generally) and can take a reasonable amount of continuous power, they take well to equalization and other effects processing (as long as it's also clean, of course). This doesn't mean you can turn them into an XB1000 though; they will "fart" if you rack the bass up too high (which I'd wager is the excursion limit - usually super-stiff drivers aren't designed to move very far (if at all)).

This doesn't really make much sense. Generally larger drivers are made for more excursion, now this may not hold true for Headphone drivers, sense the driver is so close to the ear a high excursion can be heard as distortion or can cause damage to the ears(certainly if the headphone design is that of a closed back setup). But if were speaking about raw drivers in general then i cant agree. For Example; Subwoofers,midbass drivers, even SOME tweeters(long range), follow the principle of a high excursion rate. Subwoofers design go for large drivers/high excursion, and a balance between SQL and SPL generally is to have the Xmax relative to the size of the driver at a given power demand. Stiffness in most cases adds to the reliability of the excursion and helps the control, stiff drivers are meant to control power so that you do not easily damage the coil, this is a very common practice in driver dynamics. But most notable is the fact the stiff suspension is made for longevity, as with prolonged use the suspension will start to become looser and within age you will hit a point where the driver is at its optimal performance, correct? The whole reason behind brake-in periods.In reality it could not even be a problem of the drivers but maybe be of the source sound, many songs, and sounds we listen to do not even venture in to the subsonic bass we associate with subwoofers but are simply low midbass around 60-250hz(30hz maybe). And these Sony's are fairly good at clarifying what it is you are listening to at least the ones i have heard(the Qualia 010 and sa5000's are what im looking for). The problem for me is not the bass but the control of the "brightness". which i can only associate with undercutting.

 

 

Getting back into the SA5k's though, as shown on page 2 of this thread, someone showed a picture of the Driver and a key feature is the rather deep concave of the cone Surround, as well as the material which should yield much more impact and excursion, more than enough to produce ample midrange/midbass over the rather powerful highs. Both the sa3000 and ex-1000 lack midbass when under powered yet yield a high level of highs regardless of the source. I can only assume the sa5000 follow in this practice.

 

That's all i feel to argue about now before my brain implodes. let me know your further thoughts on the matter, i always like to talk about tech.But it is still my impression that this brightness problem can be resolved just like i resolved the same issue with my ex-1000's.


Edited by maxmays1 - 12/20/12 at 6:22pm
post #468 of 600
Just read my post below this one - went back through and cleaned up with a real keyboard and mouse. Sorry for the mess. redface.gif
Edited by obobskivich - 12/20/12 at 9:20pm
post #469 of 600
EDIT from a real computer:

Sorry if anyone tried to wade through this - I had to wait for my train for ~40 minutes and figured I'd wing it on the phone. Probably won't attempt that again. redface.gif

I apologize to max if my original reply seemed too curt - was just trying to get through it, but scrolling a large reply was kind of challenging (especially with cold fingers).
Quote:
Originally Posted by maxmays1 View Post

I think you may have over judged my statement. I never said 1500mw was the nominal rating, i stated that, that power can be produced at it's Nominal OHM level being 70ohms.


No power is being produced or created, and nominal impedance is irrelevant here. 1500mw is the max input they can take. And that's probably a liberal number (as is sony's style) - it should be assumed a functional max. But you'll never see it in normal usage - way too hot given the sensitivity ratings. You also have to remember that Sony is *notorious* for goosing numbers on higher end products, just to set them apart from other products (like the SA5k claim to have a top-end of 110khz - seriously?). It's just a DNE value, it doesn't really speak to performance anywhere, and it certainly isn't a power requirement figure (that'd be the sensitivity value).
Quote:
As you may very well know these power ratings are not measured through out an entire frequency ranged but at a standard 1khz test level.

No; only znom requires a freq ref as impedance is complex. It doesn't matter how you dump 1500mw into them - they will have a bad day. Again - this is just a max power input spec, it means nothing for sonics.

[Quote/]

I am of the understanding that most companies only list there peak power level oppose the the nominal power level which is almost always 25-75% of its max in some cases even less, but in terms of the SA5ks i doubt your paying a premium to only get less than 25% of its max power level.[/quote]

Truly impossible to infer - they don't provide enough data to make this statement with any confidence. But again this spec has nothing to do with sonics. If companies were more upfront with how they're creating specs, you could go down this path, and it would net you some legitimately useful information about the limits of the driver, but for all we know 1500mW is essentially a PMPO rating, and you can only reproduce it in a lab for a fraction of a second. Again, we're talking about 1.5W into a 50mm driver - that's pretty intense when the driver isn't designed to move very aggressively (generally headphone drivers don't have surrounds or suspensions like conventional cone drivers in loudspeakers - they're usually more rigidly designed because it's assumed that they won't be moving very much, and the stiffer and lighter you can make them, the better (for sonics - this applies to speaker drivers too, it's why materials like Kevlar are so popular (this was actually mentioned in this thread a few pages back, Anaxilus brought it up)).
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1500mw is without a question the 100% load rating, and when it comes driving components or anything for that matter, it should never be done at 100% load, that's basic practice. So even if your amplifier is producing 1500mw or more it shouldn't be a problem if your utilizing it at 25-75% load.


Your thinking about power in linear and arbitrary terms. 75% vs 100% is inconsequential (you won't notice it) - its a logscale and generally speaking you will see a fraction of a mw with the SA5k due to their high sensitivity. The steps (if you want to talk perception) will be 10x at a time, so you'd go from 1 mW to 10 mW to 100 mW to 1000 mW and so on. 750 mW to 1000 mW or 75 mW to 100 mW isn't worth writing home about.

For power supply, and talking about the amplifier's output curve/distortion you're more or less on the money (but amplifier topology and power supply design certainly will change what that range can look like) - basically the bottom and top 5% are where you'll usually see the most (non-clipped) distortion. When you go over the top-end "limit" is where you get clipping, where the amplifier is literally "clipping" the waveform (hence the term) and producing nasty square wave. That can damage drivers.
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The problem i see is that you can probably produce reasonable sounding power at 30-60ohms but creating its rated power at the 70ohm level is a much more challenging task.

From the amplifier's perspective, 60R to 70R is more or less inconsequential - Ohm's law will dictate that the voltage/current relationship will vary slightly, but it isn't that dramatic. When you double or halve impedance is where you start to see big changes. Most amplifiers have no problems with the 75R Znom on the SA5k, especially given how sensitive they are. smily_headphones1.gif
Quote:
Same thing with that of the K701 and HD 650's is to create suitable power at its given ohm rating. Most problems with speaker set ups is that 50% output load is not equal to 50% power rating of the drivers, and it seems like with these high clarity SA5ks and other Sony's alike making this vary apparent in the form of brightness and impurity notification instead of clipping and distortion.


Again, nothing is "creating power" - I'm not sure where you're going with the speaker setup point, but with the SA5k the brightness is just part of their sonic signature. It's just how they are. Clipping and distortion happen when the amplifier or the headphones (or both) are over driven. Look at Tyll's data for example - when he increased their output level to 100 dB (which is a 10x increase in power over the 90 dB level), distortion goes up pretty heavily (especially in the bass). You could also clip the input block of the amplifier, which will give you clipping through the cans, but it isn't the fault of the cans or the amplifier - it's the source.
Quote:
But you stated undercutting power may be a wrong way of looking at it, it could simply be they are bright and thats all there is to it. I have my doubts because the ex-1000's i have, seem to be have a similar problem.

Apples and oranges.

Quote:
I can see how the k701 can be pickier simply because it has a much smaller window of power requirement with a similar ohm rating (62 ohms).

No. That isn't how it works - again its just a max input value. The 701 just can't handle as much input power. It isn't a "power requirement" value. Also, it isn't "ohm rating" (this is one of my longstanding pet peeves - there is no such thing as an "ohm rating"); it's impedance (or complex resistance in an AC system, if you aren't big on the whole brevity thing).

Quote:
It creates its nominal power level at almost a third of what the SA5ks do.On the contrary it is probably much easier to over power the k701's as well?

Not quite - the 701s need something like 10 to 100 times the input power for the same level output. Yes if the specs are accurate they will blow sooner.
Quote:
Speaking on in terms of the Senn's, these have a much higher impedance so creating power in its nominal range can be a trick as well for reasons you know of. Same for any other high impedance driver.

Yes and no - they need relatively more voltage (Ohm's Law) but their real "challenge" is how reactive they are, which explains a lot of the "hard to drive" complaints. The SA5k don't have that problem. Basically what it means is as you vary Zsource, you will change the FR on the HD 650; the SA5k are much more stable though, and the FR variations will be very minor.
Quote:

So with the Fiio E9 is it not the case your undercutting power?

No - the E9 can put around 1100mw into them. It sounds perfectly fine - it just has a higher noise floor and they tend to have noisy pots. Its a fine driver for them when you aren't adjusting the volume and if the slight hiss isn't a bother. Same chip-amp that a lot of higher end amps use (same chip-amp that the VHP-2 uses actually, the VHP-2 just has a better pot and lower noise floor, and is better put together). They sound just like an SA5000 on the E9, and they sound just like an SA5000 direct from speaker taps, or through a few hundred ohms of resistors, or from the VHP-2, and so on. The E9 is just not a good match for very sensitive headphones.

Quote:
I have the same problem with my Sony EX-1000 which sounds to be similar to the sa5000 in driver design(not in layout as they are completely different design

Apples and oranges.
Quote:
When i undercut power using a less powerful source(phone,media player, computer output), yes it will play loud, but it has a very piercing and distorted high frequency response,with little to no mids/bass, oppose to when driven on my Nuforce HDP or Schiit Asgaurd they sound almost perfect in the 35-75% load, but still has a hint of distortion around 75-100% power load, this piercing distortion in the higher frequency range seems similar to that of the problem i have when using the less powerful source outputs at 75-100% load, which sounds like and undercutting of power, oppose to peak power distortion/clipping, as i do not hear much clipping around the mids and lows but rather only in the high HZ level which is not indicative to over loading.

What is likely happening here is that your IEMs are reactive (most are), and are changing with variations in Zsource. This is leading to FR variations. The volume references you're providing are basically immaterial because there is no standardization.

The SA5000 are very stable though, and won't change as much. If there were clipping, you'd hear in the bass lines first (as bass demands more power), not in the treble.
Quote:

In all practices it is said you should make your peak performance at 25-75% load(and an even smaller window if you are looking for extreme efficiency) not at 75-100%, which in some cases when you undercut power you have to use your components at 75-100% to get a suitable listening level. In this zone you are most likely in the clipping and distortion level, but with some drivers and speaker designs clipping and distortion may not be so noticeable, or annoying enough to care. Unlike with these extremely detailed Sony's it is stated by many that you can hear the slightest impurities be it undercutting or over powering or crappy source input. This holds true for the Ex-1000 's as well, meaning Sony has designed something much more intelligent than users make out to be, and most likely the high frequency sensitivity issue could be a cause of under powering? yes i can understand the principle of it being "bright no matter what" but in some cases most people can take that as being piercing if you have sensitive ears, and a lot of people do(which isn't a bad thing).

Clipping always sounds like trash and can destroy drivers depending on how bad it is (clipping is bad news) - but I doubt anyone will run an amp into clipping with the SA5k. You might overload the amp's input block but that is different. The SA5k have been consistently measured as bright by various independent sources - they're just voiced that way and aren't for everyone. Clipping does not make a headphone sound brighter.
Quote:
This doesn't really make much sense. Generally larger drivers are made for more excursion, now this may not hold true for Headphone drivers, sense the driver is so close to the ear a high excursion can be heard as distortion or can cause damage to the ears(certainly if the headphone design is that of a closed back setup). But if were speaking about raw drivers in general then i cant agree. For Example; Subwoofers,midbass drivers, even SOME tweeters(long range), follow the principle of a high excursion rate. Subwoofers design go for large drivers/high excursion, and a balance between SQL and SPL generally is to have the Xmax relative to the size of the driver at a given power demand. Stiffness in most cases adds to the reliability of the excursion and helps the control, stiff drivers are meant to control power so that you do not easily damage the coil, this is a very common practice in driver dynamics. But most notable is the fact the stiff suspension is made for longevity, as with prolonged use the suspension will start to become looser and within age you will hit a point where the driver is at its optimal performance, correct? The whole reason behind brake-in periods.In reality it could not even be a problem of the drivers but maybe be of the source sound, many songs, and sounds we listen to do not even venture in to the subsonic bass we associate with subwoofers but are simply low midbass around 60-250hz(30hz maybe). And these Sony's are fairly good at clarifying what it is you are listening to at least the ones i have heard(the Qualia 010 and sa5000's are what im looking for). The problem for me is not the bass but the control of the "brightness". which i can only associate with undercutting.

More excursion means more distortion - but it usually means more output too, and modern speaker designers are trying to cheat hoffman. It never works, but don't tell them that. tongue.gif Basically the ideal driver doesn't spend a lot of time moving in and out, but to get loud (and to hit low) you need displacement, and big speakers aren't sexy. So they roll the dice. Some designs work out fairly well (but end up insensitive or with limited extension), others not as much. The idea behind large drivers in a headphone is lower excursion, lower distortion, and a larger wave-front reaching the ear. Same reason planar designs are "good."

The ideal sub or bass driver is large and doesn't move in and out much - means faster recovery, lower distortion. Most headphones get this down pretty well because they don't have to get very loud (relatively speaking). The SA5k are among such headphones.
Quote:

Getting back into the SA5k's though, as shown on page 2 of this thread, someone showed a picture of the Driver and a key feature is the rather deep concave of the cone Surround, as well as the material which should yield much more impact and excursion, more than enough to produce ample midrange/midbass over the rather powerful highs. Both the sa3000 and ex-1000 lack midbass when under powered yet yield a high level of highs regardless of the source. I can only assume the sa5000 follow in this practice.

They still fart if you eq it too aggressively (any headphones will - they just get to a point where you're asking the system to deliver something it can't). The enclosure has a lot to do with the voicing but so does the driver itself. In other words, if you had an accurate model of the SA5k drivers, you could probably make them bassier in a different enclosure, but there will still be an excursion limit or otherwise a wall where they just won't give you any more bass (especially *clean* bass). Sure, under-driving at low levels will result in less bass (perceptually), but overall we're just talking about a headphone that will never be a bass banger. That's just how they are - and there is nothing at all wrong with that. smily_headphones1.gif

Overall they need a clean amplifier more than a powerful amplifier, and if Sony's specs are to be believed, they can take a relatively large amount of input power as either a peak or instant burst. Which means they should be pretty robust and survive accidental volume boosts or relatively aggressive (but still within reason) equalization. This means you can absolutely address whatever concerns you want (within reason), and still have a good sounding headphone. As always, it's best to cut as opposed to boosting, as it does not risk clipping from the preamp/EQ into the amplifier, or asking too much of the driver. And generally you can accomplish the same results.

And again, no hard feelings intended, and I do hope you don't feel that I'm meaning to "Argue" with you. smily_headphones1.gif
Edited by obobskivich - 12/20/12 at 9:30pm
post #470 of 600

My Sony's have all been recabled to copper cables.  Nothing fancy or expensive, just large Mogami quad microphone cable.  The first thing I do to control treble in a Sony.  Just stay away from silver unless you want more treble. 

 

Oh and happy armageddon.

post #471 of 600

touche touche. subsequently it seems we have covered all that could be covered on this matter. i'm rather gladd you mentioned enclosure design which i failed to get to but it does playplay quiet a huge roll inin driver dynamics.  ii will have toto purxhase a pair and do adequite testing and modding toto figure out any theories i might havehave .

 

i apologize for anyany typos as im using a phone and thethe java script isis killing my input. i'll fix any errors and conclude any discussions i have later.

 

but thanks for your input obobskivich. i'll have to chat with you about other stuff a well;

post #472 of 600
Quote:
Originally Posted by sunneebear View Post

My Sony's have all been recabled to copper cables.  Nothing fancy or expensive, just large Mogami quad microphone cable.  The first thing I do to control treble in a Sony.  Just stay away from silver unless you want more treble. 

Oh and happy armageddon.

Oh yeah, not to mention the SA5000 cable is...ugh. I've never used the word "hate" with a cable before, but I think the SA5000 cable gets pretty close!

Quote:
Originally Posted by maxmays1 View Post

touche touche. subsequently it seems we have covered all that could be covered on this matter.

haha! beerchug.gif

Quote:
 i'm rather gladd you mentioned enclosure design which i failed to get to but it does playplay quiet a huge roll inin driver dynamics.  ii will have toto purxhase a pair and do adequite testing and modding toto figure out any theories i might havehave .

i apologize for anyany typos as im using a phone and thethe java script isis killing my input. i'll fix any errors and conclude any discussions i have later.

but thanks for your input obobskivich. i'll have to chat with you about other stuff a well;

I think you'll like them - just give the pads a little time to break-in (the leather can be stiff right out of the box), and you should be able to get a good idea of what they will do for you. And I can absolutely empathize with the whole "phones and javascript" thing! ph34r.gif
post #473 of 600

Yea the phone was about to implode when it tried writing in the script editor. Never again.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by sunneebear View Post

My Sony's have all been recabled to copper cables.  Nothing fancy or expensive, just large Mogami quad microphone cable.  The first thing I do to control treble in a Sony.  Just stay away from silver unless you want more treble. 

Oh and happy armageddon.

Oh yeah, not to mention the SA5000 cable is...ugh. I've never used the word "hate" with a cable before, but I think the SA5000 cable gets pretty close!

What cable should i go with for these? I was looking at buying some moon audio black dragon cables but there rather expensive.

post #474 of 600
Max - on the cable (and I'm not a big "cables" guy), I like the Senn HD 650 cable, but really anything is an improvement (in terms of durability/longevity, and likely ergonomics) over the factory rope.
post #475 of 600

The earth wire has snapped on mine right at the edge of the connector. I have ordered a replacement jack. But I am converting the jack form 6.3mm to 3.5mm.
 

post #476 of 600
Quote:
Originally Posted by Uncle00Jesse View Post

OMG! I think the unthinkable has just happened. I went to plug into my beloved SA5000s into my bifrost>lyr/ef-5 after about a one week hiatus from listening....and they sound like they are producing mono sound. a really bad mono sound. both channels seem to work, but its completely lifeless, i can crank the lyr up almost all the way and it barely gets much louder. its not the amp, i swapped my he-5s and they sound fine. 

 

does anyone know what this could be? is it the cable? both drivers work and theres absolutely no tear or damage to the cable whatsoever. i'm so scared i'm going to lose my precious sonys. they were my first high-end purchase too. please help. thank you

I'm back in ACTION!

 

 

 

post #477 of 600
Quote:
Originally Posted by Uncle00Jesse View Post

I'm back in ACTION!

 

 

 

 

Nice! What cable did you use? It looks really good. Your SA5000 look like they're still in excellent condition. Look at those pads! 

post #478 of 600
Quote:
Originally Posted by elwappo99 View Post

 

Nice! What cable did you use? It looks really good. Your SA5000 look like they're still in excellent condition. Look at those pads! 

Thanks man! Yea I try to keep them in the best of shape as possible, especially since you can't get them anymore. The pads are still nice n' firm, they feel like nothing on your ear. I took the great suggestion of getting it done at BTG Audio where they clearly did a phenomenal job. I went with the 8-strand SPC copper cable. My first impressions are that it has undoubtedly tamed the overall brightness of the phones quite a bit. Much less strident than before. I am really, really pleased. 


Edited by Uncle00Jesse - 1/15/13 at 5:22pm
post #479 of 600
They look very nice Jesse! I think the lighter color on the cable sheath compliments their overall style as well. smily_headphones1.gif
post #480 of 600

got one myself .. the sound is "oh so matured" ...very flat to my ears and a great upgrade from my other inventory - mine is recabled with 7 N OCC from VIABLUE audio ..

 

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