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Favorite piece of 20th/21st Century Classical Music? - Page 2

post #16 of 68

My favorite 20th Century composition is Bartók's Concerto for Orchestra. I will finally see it performed live by the Colorado SO in early January!

 

 

post #17 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by Edoardo View Post

Funny, I've always found Stravinsky somewhat still romantic to consider it 20th century... Never got that...

Stravinsky's not a Romantic composer by any stretch of the imagination, though I guess it's possible to think of him as romantic. But there's no way that Le Sacre Du Printemps isn't 20th century music. I think it's hard to imagine how strange this must have sounded when it was first performed, but the rhythms and dissonances were completely novel to Western audiences.
post #18 of 68

…almost impossible to choose, but after Stravinsky and the minimalists, I'd probably say Henryk Górecki's "Symphony No. 3, Op. 36", the "Symphony of Sorrowful Songs"…it's one I play a lot…

post #19 of 68

Stravinsky's violin concerto has a foot in both doors.

post #20 of 68

 


Quote:
Originally Posted by pigmode View Post

^ Something like Paganini I guess. I probably assumed wrong, but I thought the OP was referring to time periods.




Quote:
Originally Posted by rroseperry View Post


Stravinsky's not a Romantic composer by any stretch of the imagination, though I guess it's possible to think of him as romantic. But there's no way that Le Sacre Du Printemps isn't 20th century music. I think it's hard to imagine how strange this must have sounded when it was first performed, but the rhythms and dissonances were completely novel to Western audiences.

 

 

Of Course Stravinsky cannot be labeled as romantic, both for chronological and (most of all!) musicological reasons.

 

But you know, I've always found Le Sacre Du Printemps so imaginative, descriptive and so full of pathos that it somewhat reminds me of the romantic way of making music and arts.

 

So... When you tell me "20th century", I think Schoenberg, Bernstein, Gershwin... Stravinsky comes among the latest in the stream... Though it's always been one of my favs!

post #21 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by Edoardo View Post




Of Course Stravinsky cannot be labeled as romantic, both for chronological and (most of all!) musicological reasons.

But you know, I've always found Le Sacre Du Printemps so imaginative, descriptive and so full of pathos that it somewhat reminds me of the romantic way of making music and arts.

So... When you tell me "20th century", I think Schoenberg, Bernstein, Gershwin... Stravinsky comes among the latest in the stream... Though it's always been one of my favs!

That's an interesting ordering, since I think it's probably Stravinsky, Schoenberg, Gershwin, and then Bernstein chronologically. Also I think Stravinsky is far more adventurous harmonically than either Gershwin or Bernstein. You might like to read Alex Ross' The Rest is Noise on 20th century music. He points out that Richard Strauss was a 20th century composer (chronologically), though he doesn't quite leave the 19th, musically.
post #22 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by rroseperry View Post


That's an interesting ordering, since I think it's probably Stravinsky, Schoenberg, Gershwin, and then Bernstein chronologically. Also I think Stravinsky is far more adventurous harmonically than either Gershwin or Bernstein. You might like to read Alex Ross' The Rest is Noise on 20th century music. He points out that Richard Strauss was a 20th century composer (chronologically), though he doesn't quite leave the 19th, musically.


Agree on Strauss, though I've never read that book.

 

Stravinsky deserves another analysis, since he brought so much innovations to the very way of composing music.

The fact is that according to my taste (I don't know whether this is the right word in English: I'd say according to my feelings, literally... You may help me with that), Stravinsky completely leaves the 19th Century from a musical point of view; yet his feelings, themes, concepts, whatever you want to call those, are still Romantic.

 

I mean... What's more tipically Romantic than the reissue of a Pagan Rite?

On the other side, what could be more tipically "20th centur-ist" than the doubts of Bernstein's Candide, or than the randomness of Schoenberg's music?

 

So... Could we say that Stravinsky was a 20th century composer with romantic feelings, or a romantic mindset?

 

My two cents.


Edited by Edoardo - 11/29/11 at 10:31am
post #23 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by Edoardo View Post



Agree on Strauss, though I've never read that book.

Stravinsky deserves another analysis, since he brought so much innovations to the very way of composing music.
The fact is that according to my taste (I don't know whether this is the right word in English: I'd say according to my feelings, literally... You may help me with that), Stravinsky completely leaves the 19th Century from a musical point of view; yet his feelings, themes, concepts, whatever you want to call those, are still Romantic.

I mean... What's more tipically Romantic than the reissue of a Pagan Rite?
On the other side, what could be more tipically "20th centur-ist" than the doubts of Bernstein's Candide, or than the randomness of Schoenberg's music?

So... Could we say that Stravinsky was a 20th century composer with romantic feelings, or a romantic mindset?

My two cents.

I think that Stravinsky has a lot of feeling in his music. For some reason, people tend not to associate lots of emotional expression with 20th century music. Maybe because of all the harmonic experimentation that doesn't connect as easily to our emotions as earlier forms. But there's a lot of other 20th century music that's extremely expressive, Part, Goreckyi, Webern, Britten, Barber, there's a lot of heart, but it's not given as high a profile as say Schoenberg, Boulez, Xenakis, and the like.
post #24 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by rroseperry View Post


I think that Stravinsky has a lot of feeling in his music. For some reason, people tend not to associate lots of emotional expression with 20th century music. Maybe because of all the harmonic experimentation that doesn't connect as easily to our emotions as earlier forms. But there's a lot of other 20th century music that's extremely expressive, Part, Goreckyi, Webern, Britten, Barber, there's a lot of heart, but it's not given as high a profile as say Schoenberg, Boulez, Xenakis, and the like.


It depends... To make an example, A Survivor from Warsaw  by Shoenberg is extremely emotional, and most of all, it could NOT have been put into music in any other way.

 

Here I was just focusing on the topics, or literary topoi, if you prefer... As each artistic age has its own ones.

 

On the other hand, I'm trying to remember the composer of a concert I attended few years ago... A contemporary string quartet, my God, I got so bored that at some point I started to think I was having a nightmare...

I couldn't tell what was worse, the jarring notes or those dressed-up old ladies pretending they were enjoying it...


Edited by Edoardo - 11/29/11 at 11:42am
post #25 of 68

…um, Shostakovich? Sometimes I think folks forget that he's 20th century, too…

post #26 of 68

I can't tell, I must admit I don't know Shostakovich that well

post #27 of 68
Shostakovich is definitely worth a listen or several. I've been listening to the Melnikov Preludes and Fugues for close to a year now. His chamber work is great. I'm less convinced by the symphonies, though there's a Russian live recording of the 5th that is stunning.
post #28 of 68
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by tru blu View Post

…almost impossible to choose, but after Stravinsky and the minimalists, I'd probably say Henryk Górecki's "Symphony No. 3, Op. 36", the "Symphony of Sorrowful Songs"…it's one I play a lot…



My second fave piece wink.gif

post #29 of 68

Boulez ,Le marteau sans maître

Xenakis, Kraanerg

Nono, Prometeo

Maderna, Quadrivium

Stockhausen, Gruppen

Birtwistle, Earth Dances

 

 

Just off the top of my head from the more extreme end of the 20th century.

 

But anything from Stravinsky and Prokofiev, the 2 truly great composers from the start of the 20th century. (Strauss accepted)

 

Benjamin Britten, deserves a mention too

post #30 of 68

if anyone wants to try something new and quite brilliant try this:

 

harvey.jpg

 

One of the greatest living composers

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