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The loudest Headphone - Page 3

post #31 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by RPGWiZaRD View Post


Why would you want to damage your hearing? That's what we're wondering about, doesn't matter if you have good hearing now. I'd treasure a good hearing like a little baby.

 



It is a myth that babies can see or hear better than youths/young adults. We are born with severe myopia, it takes a few years to have normal eye sight.  Similarly, babies are sensitive to sounds but their brain wiring is not fully developed yet. The ears are still muturing. What you mean is you'd treasure a good hearing like a young boy.

post #32 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by RPGWiZaRD View Post


Well I don't know how I'd able to live with a very loud tinnitus which the person will eventually get if he continues like that. Would bug the **** outta me.



I highly agree but the point is to die before it becomes an issue. I would say live to 45. Thats my goal anyways. I am terrified of old age.

 

I listen to my music rather loud. I know it's bad for my hearing but i can't help it. Music just sounds substantially better loud.

post #33 of 42

Unfortunately, listening to music at 125 dB (or at any level for that matter) won't cause you to die at 45. Your masochistic and pre-suicidal behaviour worries me.

post #34 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by kingpage View Post



It is a myth that babies can see or hear better than youths/young adults. We are born with severe myopia, it takes a few years to have normal eye sight.  Similarly, babies are sensitive to sounds but their brain wiring is not fully developed yet. The ears are still muturing. What you mean is you'd treasure a good hearing like a young boy.


I mean take as good care of the hearing as you would take care of a baby (wasn't referring to a new-borns hearing abilities). But this is offtopic/irrelevant so let's leave this discussion.

 

If you find the right sounding headphone, you can lower the volume levels a bit and still get equally satisfied like another headphone that doesn't quite sound as satisfying. Listening louder neglects this need somewhat of finding the headphone with the right headphone curve for you to get satisfied with the sound. If you're a basshead you should get a headphone with strong bass, if you like highs, you should get a bright headphone etc instead of turning volume up as everything else in the frequency range also gets turned up and gets louder. So finding the right curve for you how you want it to sound like is also rather important from a hearing protection point of view to make sure you can listen to as low volume as possible to get satisfied.

 


Edited by RPGWiZaRD - 11/14/11 at 4:06am
post #35 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by bcasey25raptor View Post

Trust me the sennheiser hd 25 is very loud. Thats why i love them so much. Well one of the many reasons.

 

I do not doubt that it is very loud, it is just not as loud as indicated on the site linked above, because the 120 dB sensitivity is specified at 1 Vrms, as it is common with most Sennheiser headphones. The correctly calculated maximum SPL is - assuming that the specs are accurate - about 134 dB, which is still extremely loud. With a speaker of 89 dB/W sensitivity, you would need more than 30,000 W of power to produce that sound pressure.

 


Edited by stv014 - 11/14/11 at 4:05am
post #36 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by bcasey25raptor View Post

 

I listen to my music rather loud. I know it's bad for my hearing but i can't help it. Music just sounds substantially better loud.



Music doesn't sound better with hearing loss mate. I think one needs to learn to enjoy music on a low volume level. I also used to think low volume music was boring and couldn't help but turning it up. But trust me, with good headphones you don't need to pump up the volume to hear all the details and listening to music is so much more enjoyable if you know you're not damaging your hearing in the process. I actually find I can pick up more subtle details in the music on a lower volume level because my ears seem more relaxed, makes sense.

 

Just gotta force yourself to listen with low volume, you'll get used to it and in the end you'll PREFER to listen to lower volumes.

 

post #37 of 42

I'm amazed at some of the volumes people manage. I mean shocked.

 

I know I listen at relatively low volume. I've had experiences where I was listening to my D1001s (not very isolating) during a quiet passage and someone walked by wearing buds or some cheap headphones and I could hear THEIR music coming out of their transducers from several feet away over the isolation of the D1001s and the sound of my music. I just don't understand.

 

I love soft music. I feel like my ears and auditory system embrace and reach out to the music when it's not blaring or even medium volume, and that actually involves me in it MORE.

post #38 of 42

Great post!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Aizura View Post

...with good headphones you don't need to pump up the volume to hear all the details and listening to music is so much more enjoyable if you know you're not damaging your hearing in the process. I actually find I can pick up more subtle details in the music on a lower volume level because my ears seem more relaxed, makes sense.

 

Just gotta force yourself to listen with low volume, you'll get used to it and in the end you'll PREFER to listen to lower volumes.


 

 

post #39 of 42

    What a great controversy. He asked a simple question and it went into debate about hearing loss and why he shouldn't have his question answered. This is the same reason I left a fish forum because they refuse to talk to you unless you have a 1000 gallon tank for a single big fish. He know's hearing might or might not be damaged. So what?   I'll tell you how I feel about it.

     My hearing is very slightly damaged and it sucks.  I Do wish to live my life listening to Very loud music. I disslike loud talkers and loud city noises. Realize there are many people that choose this route.

post #40 of 42

You are aware that this thread is 9 months' old right?


Edited by Eric_C - 8/1/12 at 11:37pm
post #41 of 42
you might find you can increase the perceived loudness with dolby headphone without damaging your ears I love it.
post #42 of 42

LOL at the OP.. im in the same boat as you.. Unfortunately, i get very easily distracted, and i just dont enjoy music when i can hear anything else with it. I dont get the goosebumps on the climax of the song if i hear cars driving by me, or someone mumbling.  or if i can hear myself doing that "i sound like a deff person trying to sing" thing.. you gotta know what im talking about.. I seem to have very good hearing at 29, and ive been the guy who has walked 25+ miles a week with headphones on FULL VOLUME the whole time. I also own a rediculous 5.2 setup, with 15" woofers and 18" subwoofers that i DO tend to use much louder then i should. Its nice that people seem to care, but unfortunately, they dont realize they are taking the joy out of the music for some.. Its the same reason i love a live rock concert, where you feel the music in your bones.. I am currently looking for headphones, too. And loudness is a factor for me, too. Will i wish i still had my hearing at 60? Im sure. But can i live now without the joy of music i so desperately crave?.... unfortunately, i just dont think so. Please dont chew me out for my opinion, as i understand im mostly in the wrong, but sometimes we just cant help our vices.

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