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Grado modders go Magnum - Page 154

post #2296 of 3165

Wrap layers of electrical tape around the driver.

post #2297 of 3165

To make sure that you hear the cups and not the electrical tape, I would use a "rigid tape" that would transmit mechanical vibration from the drivers to the cups instead of dampening them.

 

I would aim for a material that is about as stiff as the wood used for your cups, like a thin ring of the same wood, ideally. If you have nothing else, electrical tape would be better than foam (for example), yes, but I would try to do better myself.


Edited by devouringone3 - 1/23/13 at 2:03pm
post #2298 of 3165
Good to hear...it's probably going to be tape then, unless the local hardware magically has steel rings exactly the right size...
post #2299 of 3165
...double post
post #2300 of 3165

Actually I edited out the steel ring idea, I realize it's doing the contrary of what I would aim for and would probably choke the driver.

 

The best would be to have cups the right size but I understand it's not always possible.

 

 ("press" as in perfect fit, no tape or stuffing material used in between)

Another solution would be to extract bigger ~40 mm diaphragm drivers of another headphone and try to make a better match with your cups ;); it's not like any wooden cups made on or for Head-Fi were crafted for optimal sound with the Grado drivers in the first place anyway.


Edited by devouringone3 - 1/23/13 at 2:13pm
post #2301 of 3165
Quote:
Originally Posted by devouringone3 View Post

To make sure that you hear the cups and not the electrical tape, I would use a "rigid tape" that would transmit mechanical vibration from the drivers to the cups instead of dampening them.

 

I would aim for a material that is about as stiff as the wood used for your cups, like a thin ring of the same wood, ideally. If you have nothing else, electrical tape would be better than foam (for example), yes, but I would try to do better myself.


In that regard, scotch tape is more rigid and less elastic than electrical. Thelostmidrange has tons of experience in this area, I'd see if he has an opinion, if I were you.

post #2302 of 3165

Yes he has one stand (against electrical tape, even more foam):

 

His answers:

 

"Just don't use electrical/rubber type tape."

 

"I may have some super thin walnut. you could theoretically soak it with hot water and bend it around the driver while installing. It will dry and hold tight. and still transmit energy. In theory."

 

 

And the "LostMojo" image I posted is from him.

 

 

We had a private message discussion on the matter; I'm in the same boat as you fleasbaby right now as I have ~46 mm wide opening wooden cup for a ~45 mm Grado driver.


Edited by devouringone3 - 1/23/13 at 2:35pm
post #2303 of 3165
So close, yet so far! I think the electrical tape idea is the most realistic, but it kind of hurts to think about gunking up the drivers with layers of tape...

I might reverse the sticky side and put it against the cup instead of the driver, which would at least make it possible to remove them at a later date when an accurately cut pair of cups becomes a reality...we'll see.
post #2304 of 3165
Quote:
Originally Posted by fleasbaby View Post

So close, yet so far! I think the electrical tape idea is the most realistic, but it kind of hurts to think about gunking up the drivers with layers of tape...

I might reverse the sticky side and put it against the cup instead of the driver, which would at least make it possible to remove them at a later date when an accurately cut pair of cups becomes a reality...we'll see.


Depending on the cups, that could do some damage to the wood. Whereas the aluminum of the driver is unlikely to be harmed.

post #2305 of 3165
The drivers are ringed with plastic, not aluminum. Going to do a little research I think, maybe do a cruise through the hardware store on my lunch break and see what's around...keep the suggestions coming!
post #2306 of 3165
Hmmm...actually, I still have the parts from the old Grado shells when I liberated my 225i drivers...I might be able to find a thin ring of plastic that's the right size in all of that...
post #2307 of 3165

I don't what all of this stuff about "energy transfer" is about but...you could try self adhering medical tape from the drug store. It's light brown and sticks to itself but it there is no glue or anything gunking it up.

post #2308 of 3165

I see the driver as a vibrating whole (it's diaphragm, sound producing membrane; and its plastic body). The cups are there to hold it tightly so that most of that mechanical vibration (including break up modes and erratic behaviors) is either, A) in the case of heavy/inert aluminum cups forced on the diaphragm to unload all by itself B) transferred to the (lighter, often wooden) cups for them to diffuse/transfer parts of the mechanical vibration in the ambient air (expanding the "vibrating whole" group to include the cups).

 

 

An aside about the "A) and B)" (Click to show)

 

A and B are two categories I'm starting to believe in. The school of the biggest possible heaviest and deadest cup, bearing no positive or negative impact on the sound of the driver (if the driver is bad to start up with, it will remain bad) and the school of the musical instrument (lower mass/density, smaller size) cups, which resonates along with the driver, focuses the good, diffuse out the break up modes and erratic behaviors etc.. and the later which are basically your chance of tuning your headphone/sound to your liking.

 

So far there seem to be only one member in school B), it's thelostMIDrange (lol; as much as I would like to join him, personally I'm on the side of the big aluminum cups, mainly because of the headphones I already own) *We are three: thelostMIDrange, chrislangley4253, devouringone3

 

 

Basically if you hold your drivers in foam you will hear the sound of foam, and not the sound of wood or metal of your cups, as the same driver in foam would plainly sound the same in any material of cups of the same geometry, if held in the same foam. That is how I conceive it at least in theory; though in practice it can't see it being 100% true. The way you "fit" the driver in the cup is really important according to thelostMIDrange, which again (like scootsit said), is experienced in the field. Not too tight, not too loose, according to him.

 

And I think the same personally and because of my reasoning of how I think those things work, that the way the driver mates with the cups is crucial.


Edited by devouringone3 - 1/23/13 at 9:02pm
post #2309 of 3165

I am strongly in camp B, along with more than a few others.. Don't single out midrange, a lot of people are very happy applying his methodologies to their grado headphones.

I have no beef, just wanted to speak up.


Also, I think you meant to say experience instead of experimented in the field.

post #2310 of 3165
Quote:
Originally Posted by devouringone3 View Post

I see the driver as a vibrating whole (it's diaphragm, sound producing membrane; and its plastic body). The cups are there to hold it tightly so that most of that mechanical vibration (including break up modes and erratic behaviors) is either, A) in the case of heavy/inert aluminum cups forced on the diaphragm to unload all by itself B) transferred to the (lighter, often wooden) cups for them to diffuse/transfer parts of the mechanical vibration in the ambient air (expanding the "vibrating whole" group to include the cups).

An aside about the A) and B) (Click to show)

A and B are two categories I'm starting to believe in. The school of the biggest possible heaviest and deadest cup, bearing no positive or negative impact on the sound of the driver (if the driver is bad to start up with, it will remain bad) and the school of the musical instrument (lower mass/density, smaller size) cups, which resonates along with the driver, focuses the good, diffuse out the break up modes and erratic behaviors etc.. and the later which are basically your chance of tuning your headphone/sound to your liking.

So far there seem to be only one member in school B), it's thelostMIDrange (lol; as much as I would likee to join him, personally I'm on the side of the big aluminum cups, mainly because of the headphones I already own)

Basically if you hold your drivers in foam you will hear the sound of foam, and not the sound of wood or metal of your cups, as the same driver in foam would plainly sound the same in any material of cups of the same geometry, if held in the same foam. That is how I conceive it at least in theory; though in practice it can't see it being 100% true. The way you "fit" the driver in the cup is really important according to thelostMIDrange, which again (like scootsit said), is experimented in the field. Not too tight, not too loose, according to him.

And I think the same personally and because of my reasoning of how I think those things work, that the way the driver mates with the cups is crucial.
I'm only being a little facetious when I say this...so you are saying that Grado headphones sound like glue since they are all glued in? biggrin.gif
Edited by joeq70 - 1/23/13 at 7:07pm
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