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Shure SE535 Special Edition - Page 14

post #196 of 233

Inks: Do you know that it is not possible for anyone to reliably measure headphones or IEMs of any kind above 10 kHz?

post #197 of 233
In terms of linearity of response, no may be unreliable tho past 16k, but bandwidth can be reliably measured. If the IEM is making a potent signal is because its still within its bandwidth limits, W4 easily reaches 20k
Edited by Inks - 4/17/13 at 9:56pm
post #198 of 233
Is that coming from a published source?

iec defines the accuracy of measurement within 100hz to 12.5 khz

Itu is 100hz to 16khz
Edited by Inks - 4/17/13 at 10:02pm
post #199 of 233

I have never met anybody who can hear around 24khz at normal listening levels. I can hear a single pitch of 24khz on my speakers when it is turned up to a ridiculously high volume to the extent that I feel my ears bleed....

post #200 of 233

Probably a distortion product and not 24k. Very dangerous for those tweeters.

 

Too many threads have become inductive technobabble of late.frown.gif


Edited by goodvibes - 4/18/13 at 5:11am
post #201 of 233
Quote:
Originally Posted by Inks View Post

Is that coming from a published source?

iec defines the accuracy of measurement within 100hz to 12.5 khz

Itu is 100hz to 16khz

In the goldenears.net graphs, with their silicone tips, the w4r is 17-20db down at 20K, GR10 is 25db down and the E-q7 and 535 are nowhere to be seen at 18k. I don't think it's a big deal considering use and content of source. High frequency extention is one of the smaller measures of goodness. No one calls the HF5 high frequency limited and it's also dead at 18k.

post #202 of 233

can these be bought anywhere in the US?

post #203 of 233
Quote:
Originally Posted by goodvibes View Post

In the goldenears.net graphs, with their silicone tips, the w4r is 17-20db down at 20K, GR10 is 25db down and the E-q7 and 535 are nowhere to be seen at 18k. I don't think it's a big deal considering use and content of source. High frequency extention is one of the smaller measures of goodness. No one calls the HF5 high frequency limited and it's also dead at 18k.

I agree, sheer treble bandwidth isn't a big performance indicator of treble. Many IEMs reach higher than a HF5 but the HF5 don't practically sound rolled off because they don't roll off at all until their limit while some IEMs that can reach higher already have lost a lot of treble signal once they've past 10k.


Hmm will have to redo my 24k test, certainly odd test as its mostly feel from what I recall.
Edited by Inks - 4/18/13 at 8:05am
post #204 of 233
Quote:
Originally Posted by goodvibes View Post

In the goldenears.net graphs, with their silicone tips, the w4r is 17-20db down at 20K, GR10 is 25db down and the E-q7 and 535 are nowhere to be seen at 18k. I don't think it's a big deal considering use and content of source. High frequency extention is one of the smaller measures of goodness. No one calls the HF5 high frequency limited and it's also dead at 18k.

Please note that Golden Ears never tested the 535 SE with the extended treble response so comparisons are impossible.
post #205 of 233
Quote:
Originally Posted by Inks View Post

Is that coming from a published source?

iec defines the accuracy of measurement within 100hz to 12.5 khz

Itu is 100hz to 16khz

 

It comes from actual engineers in the industry. I don't know a technical source to quote it, but I can ask. I did gather that the latest methods can go up to 12 kHz, but we're talking bleeding edge. Regardless, there is little to nothing above 12 kHz in music, so it is rather moot. It is more likely to be relevant to younger people who can hear higher being sensitive to, say, distortion from different digital filters and other harmonics I reckon.

 

By the way, you might want to put your qualifications and details of your industry experience, if any, in your signature.

post #206 of 233

Not yet. There is a Red version sold in just a few select placed around the US but *these are not the same thing.* There is a Special Edition (RED) and a Limited Edition (also RED) but the ones sold in the US don't have the improved acoustical tuning. But the do sell for the increased price! I can't remember if the Special Edition or the Limited Edition are the improved version. You can order them and have them shipped but the ones we're talking about here are only available in the asian market.

post #207 of 233

I am also confused because there is a red one with grey foam tips on the cover and a red one with black foam tips... :S

post #208 of 233
Quote:
Originally Posted by spook76 View Post


Please note that Golden Ears never tested the 535 SE with the extended treble response so comparisons are impossible.

It is when they use the same drivers as per your statements. They do.

post #209 of 233
Quote:
Originally Posted by goodvibes View Post

It is when they use the same drivers as per your statements. They do.

Do you know if Shure used the same BAs as in the regular 535? If not it is pure speculation on your part. Shure could also have altered the chamber to achieve the higher freq response.
post #210 of 233
Quote:
Originally Posted by goodvibes View Post

It is when they use the same drivers as per your statements. They do.

There is a great article here in Head Fi: http://www.head-fi.org/t/657603/everything-youve-ever-wanted-to-know-about-balanced-armatures-by-eric-hruza-from-sonion
Explaining all the ways the sound can be changed. Do you know what Shure did to enhance the freq. response?
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