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Shure SE535 Special Edition - Page 11

post #151 of 235
Thanks for your replies, guys!
Quote:
Originally Posted by kfki View Post


Dude, you just hit the right button! SE535ltd is super deliciously sound cool, not only they fix the roll offs that the original has, the overall soundstage had increased significantly! I think pairing with an ordinary mp3 player sounds pretty good. Pairing up with AK100 would sound even more fantastic! I'm so super jealous right now! Dude I would not recommend replacing the cable as it will no longer have the Shure signature sound! Also it doesn't need no amps to push the sound! So you already own AK100? How much did you pay for it?

 

Yeah, I already have AK100, the stock version - not RWAK100. Bought it from Korea - about $700. The cable I want to get is Oyaide HPC-SE. I'm like an Oyaide fan, all my interconnects are made by Oyaide - really love the quality and sound they provide. So, I'll save some money, as don't need an amp:))))))
Edited by aqtaket - 3/15/13 at 7:40pm
post #152 of 235
Quote:
Originally Posted by spook76 View Post

I would agree in part and disagree in part. I had a E11 then tried a JDS O2 amp with my SE 535 Special Editions and found that I did not need an amp at all. As for custom cables, I would have to disagree. I purchased the Silverray cables from Headphonelounge and they did nothing but inhance the already great sound by bringing greater clearity and overall tightness to the entire sonic signature without in any way taking away the great Shure sound. 


But did you replace it because your cable was defective? BTW how much were the Silverray cables?

post #153 of 235
Quote:
Originally Posted by kfki View Post


But did you replace it because your cable was defective? BTW how much were the Silverray cables?

Not at all my stick cables still work great. Please check out my review of the Silverrays at the following hyperlink here at Head-Fi:  http://www.head-fi.org/t/617336/chris-himself-headphonelounge

post #154 of 235
Quote:
Originally Posted by spkrs01 View Post

Bought a pair on Tuesday and today added a 3rd party cable, Baldur Mk2, as I hated the stock (aesthetic reasons).

 

This combination is a match, made in heaven. The sound is truly stunning!

 

Stock red 535, my Westone 4 was better. With the Baldur Mk2, the red 535 trumps the W4s many times over in every aspect. Never thought I would say that as I had never liked the original 535s.

 

Funnily, I bought the red 535s on a whim after reading this thread Tuesday morning. So glad I did!!

Can you please let us know how it pairs with your AK100? Thanks

post #155 of 235
Quote:
Originally Posted by aqtaket View Post

Hi guys!

I have just ordered these read beauties.

Do you think SE535ltd would sound better with a portable amp?

The source is iRiver AK100.

And of course, I'll replace the original cable.

 

Thanks for any responses

It wouldn't sound well. The AK100 has an impedance of 20ohs (contrary to what it may be marketed as, I believe under 1 ohm?) and the Shure 35 ohms. As a rule of thumb, the source impedance should be smaller or equal to an eighth of the headphone impedance. Otherwise, as NwAvGuy puts it succinctly,

  • Headphone impedance changes with frequency. If the output impedance is much above zero this means the voltage delivered to the headphones will also change with frequency. The greater the output impedance, the greater the frequency response deviations. Different headphones will interact in different, and typically unpredictable, ways with the source. Sometimes these variations can be large and plainly audible.
  • As output impedance increases electrical damping is reduced. The bass performance of the headphones, as designed by the manufacture, may be audibly compromised if there’s insufficient damping. The bass might become more “boomy” and less controlled. The transient response becomes worse and the deep bass performance is compromised (the headphones will roll off sooner at low frequencies). A few, such as those who like a very warm “tube like” sound, might enjoy this sort of under damped bass. But it’s almost always less accurate compared to using a low impedance source.
post #156 of 235

That only works if the IEM is proven to degrade with impedance such as the TF10, SE535 might be the opposite case as I know the SE425 does improve with it. 

 

The case he makes is specific to the full-size headphones that user you quoted tested, not applicable to many IEMs. 

post #157 of 235
Quote:
Originally Posted by Inks View Post

That only works if the IEM is proven to degrade with impedance such as the TF10, SE535 might be the opposite case as I know the SE425 does improve with it. 

 

The case he makes is specific to the full-size headphones that user you quoted tested, not applicable to many IEMs. 

 

Full-size headphones or IEMs, it doesn't make a difference. It applies to all impedances relating to any source/output. With regards to an improvement, I guess some people might prefer frequency deviations... I think it's more to do with recessed bass leading to the volume being racked up which in turn gives a 'better sonic experience' as the louder it is generally the better sounding it is. 

post #158 of 235
It does make a difference, impedance curves of the IEM and headphone will say if the change is good or bad or if there is any change at all. Their acoustics are very different, its huge. With dynamic IEMs for the most part impedance changes with source don't change anything.

Decreasing bass will not always lead to higher volume, specially if the sound is harsh in the treble. t's a case to case scenario and there are also sweetspots, adding impedance but not too much.
Edited by Inks - 4/16/13 at 12:02am
post #159 of 235

Yes of course there is a difference you are essentially creating frequency deviations maybe for the better maybe for the worse. But why on earth would you go about doing this with impedance mismatching? Why not just rely on good old EQ?

post #160 of 235
To get the best sound. Point being, listen to the SE535 with a bit more impedance by the source, don't be afraid of it as the result may be better.

If you're going to EQ why get a SE535? It's got limited bandwidth. Actually adding impedance may help bandwidth as it surely did to the SE425
Edited by Inks - 4/16/13 at 12:08am
post #161 of 235

With the Shures I listen to very mid-centric music and comfort-wise I think it is one of the very best out there. I have very fussy ears angry_face.gif

post #162 of 235


Here's SE425, bass is about the same but treble and bandwidth greatly improve with impedance. SE535 may be the same as they use the same tweeter
Edited by Inks - 4/16/13 at 12:13am
post #163 of 235

I see but the differences in your graph would be inaudible. I would still use EQ to flat out the treble if it mattered so much. But, why would you purposefully buy high impedance sources to hopefully improve the sound like expecting to win a lottery.


Edited by uchihaitachi - 4/16/13 at 12:19am
post #164 of 235
Lol 4db difference is clearly audible, some people claim a 0.5db difference is audible...

EQ can be beneficial but adding impedance in this case does what EQ can't, increase bandwidth, giving the IEM more air. It's not a lottery if you know the specifics, I do this to the W4 I use for a reason.

I personally have a low impedance source and add impedance with a resistor, but my point is to not be afraid to add impedance to the SE535 as it may be beneficial if anything
Edited by Inks - 4/16/13 at 12:33am
post #165 of 235

You can't 'increase' bandwidth with impedance mismatch. You could be adding distortion producing frequencies that aren't even there in the first place. EQ is the solution to all your problems. Why approach it by meddling around with impedance. Or are you referring to gain and bandwidth?


Edited by uchihaitachi - 4/16/13 at 12:41am
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