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What do people mean when they say "mid highs and lows" of a music?

post #1 of 5
Thread Starter 
Just wanted to ask because many people have been using it to describe the sound output and I don't quite understand.

Also, what's the difference between bass and treble?

Thanks
post #2 of 5

I go by approximate frequencies, but sometimes slip into describing specific instruments. For me:

 

<60Hz: Sub-bass

60-160Hz: Mid-bass (80-110 for the mid-bass hump)

160-~1kHz: Lower mid-range

~1kHz-4kHz: Upper mid-range

4kHz-10kHz: Treble

>10kHz: Upper treble

 

For instruments, kick drum and bass guitar are usually in the mid-bass, with some of it in the sub-bass with synthetic bass and stuff like that. Lower mid-range has some more bass guitar, guitar that's tuned down, and deep voices. Upper mid-range has higher voices, guitar, and snare drum attack. Treble has cymbal, sibilance, flutes, and synthetic trebly noise stuff.

post #3 of 5
You might find this chart helpful too.
post #4 of 5

Aaaand in case OP wants an explanation in terms other than frequencies:

Think of a drum. You know the "oomph" of the kick? Bass.

High hats? Treble.

 

This is a very rough guide, but I suspect many people do think of bass and treble in such terms.

post #5 of 5
Quote:
Originally Posted by rroseperry View Post

You might find this chart helpful too.

Ive seen this before, but yes this chart is very helpful.
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