or Connect
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

The Basshead Club - Page 601  

post #9001 of 11259
Quote:

Originally Posted by Swolern View Post


No really, take a look. All other sound sig clubs are only 5-20 pages long. Basshead club blows them all away!

 

 

i think you miss my point: yes, the basshead club thread has the most posts by far, but that doesn't mean it's the largest club (as in the most people associate with it). most active members posting in the thread, sure. but if you took a poll of all members on head fi, i'm sure basshead club would be the minority. my point was that people who belong to other "clubs" don't feel the need to follow/post in their respective "clubs" because the whole forum is their club! :)

 

it's like the "asian club" or "greek club" or "chess club" at uni (in a western nation)...they have way more (active) members than the "white anglo-saxon club" (which doesn't actually exist, because life in a western nation is already that club!).

 

just giving an explanation for why this thread is so large in comparison (it's not because head fi has more bassheads than any other sound sig). more generally, i was just commenting that we are different from the others around here, hence why we stick together! :)


Edited by caprimulgus - 2/9/14 at 5:25pm
post #9002 of 11259
Quote:
Originally Posted by adamlr View Post

that sounds awesome eek.gif



anyhoo. i was thinking of getting caught up in all the alpha pad craze that went on a couple of pages back and get a pair for my newly arrived d2ks. so i went to the mrspeakers shop and came to a holt when i saw how much they cost. come to think about it, these stock pads are pretty nice as they are... 
so to those of you who have done this (cCasper TFG for example), is it worth it in your opinion? how much does it increase the sub bass? how much of a v shape do the d2ks get? is it sharp? 

I've put Alpha pads on a Q40, a D5000, a D2000, tested them on a DT770 and a Pro900. Tried them on my D7000 but prefer the Lawton angle pads for that application.

To me they are worth the $60.
post #9003 of 11259
Quote:
Originally Posted by SP Wild View Post
 

 

When are you boys gonna grow up?

 

 

18 inches...much bigger than your puny 15s.  :tongue:

 

*photo pinched from Digital Audio Review

 

 

I see a railing and perhaps another apt building in the back ground so it looks like that person lives in an apartment. The neighbors must love him. My victims can drive away...looks like he has his victims trapped:evil:

post #9004 of 11259
Quote:
Originally Posted by SP Wild View Post
 

 

Bass don't get you girls.  Your personality does.  Here in Australia driving around with thumping bass through the neighborhood is a definite turn-off for girls.

 

To the folks talking about the rattling

 

 

This takes care of that as well as other modifications. All you hear inside or out is sonic assaults on your body and ears. Rattling is for kids who do things 1/2 way.

 

And Boomy bass systems do get chicks. Not by themselves but they don't turn girls off in Hawaii walking along the main beach in Waikiki...oh no no...they like it...and my charm but the bass isn't a repelent unless your ugly ,your car is ugly or your sound is ugly...or any combo of the 3:D

post #9005 of 11259

Mate, that stuff is expensive. I was only 18 :P

post #9006 of 11259
Quote:
Originally Posted by White Lotus View Post
 

Mate, that stuff is expensive. I was only 18 :P

Yeah, it is. It wasn't so bad at first as it was used for another thing and kids and pro's ported it over as auto sound dampening and some specialty products came about. 1995ish When I first started applying it it was reasonable but quickly became ridiculously expensive:(

post #9007 of 11259

Has anyone here heard the Sennheiser HD7 or HD8 DJ? I am trying to decide between those or a Signature Pro. I like deep bass and a warm sound with good detail. Havent heard or read much about the new sennheiser's, they're available on Sennheiser's website right now.

post #9008 of 11259
Quote:
Originally Posted by Oregonian View Post

tested them on a DT770 and a Pro900.

 

you didn't like them on the DT770, or you just ran out of angle pads and decided to use them on the other headphones where you liked them better?

post #9009 of 11259
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hawaiibadboy View Post
 

 

 

I see a railing and perhaps another apt building in the back ground so it looks like that person lives in an apartment. The neighbors must love him. My victims can drive away...looks like he has his victims trapped:evil:

 

Hahah!  Y'all think y'all bad-boyz - step into my evil world - makes corporate empires look like childish mischiefs...:devil_face:

 

HAHAH HAHAH !!!

post #9010 of 11259
Quote:
Originally Posted by Oregonian View Post


I've put Alpha pads on a Q40, a D5000, a D2000, tested them on a DT770 and a Pro900. Tried them on my D7000 but prefer the Lawton angle pads for that application.

To me they are worth the $60.


cheers

post #9011 of 11259

Thought I'd share my lengthy post I posted in another thread that belongs to this club. :)
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by RPGWiZaRD View Post
 


Yea Pro900 is definitely not the bassiest but it has some of the very best bass quantity/power vs quality bass response out there. Too bad the rest of the range doesn't match anywhere close to its bass qualities.

The thing with Pro900's bass or the secret of it, lies mostly in its bass curve shape. It has like ideal configured curve for maximum bass punchiness/impact. This "punchiness/impact" or slam if you will is what many associates as it being percieved as very strong bass response, even if there exists several extreme bass headphones out there with more bass, but the way it "hits-you-in-the-face" is of very impressive authority on Pro900.

Here let me talk for a bit what brings maximum impact/punch/slam. I've experienced the same with testing various basshead headphones with their varied bass characteristics and compared the frequency response as well as when mastering hardstyle tracks for various newcomers. Hardstyle genre, bass-wise, is all about punch/impact, not necessarily so much about sheer (sub)bass quantity why I'm a big fan of it as I like punch/impact. In fact too much bloated subbass quantity can actually worsen the impact significantly. 

Notice, the marked areas with green circles reveals also how much punchiness there is to the bass in Tyll's 30Hz square wave measurements, the peakier this area is, the more punchier the bass is and also the lower vertically stretched the signal is (from the top to the bottom of the square wave), the more controlled/tight it is. The Pro900 is both tight/controlled and punchy. Useful to know, Tyll explained these things also a little while ago how to interpret his graphs.

 

 

1. The key ingredient is in the shape of the bass curve, for maximum impact/punch you want a narrow hillshape curve in the frequency response graph that rolls-off down deep, starting to roll-off after maybe 40~50Hz or so and also in the upper-end of the bass curve in the region between 150-200Hz. The "peakier" the response (higher & more narrow), the more impact is felt as the bass becomes focused and there's a lot of energy focused on a narrow area. It's like comparing high-heels vs normal flat shoes, the high-heels wear out dancefloors a lot sooner due to applying a very high pressure on a small contact area. Translate this to headphone's frequency response and you can say a headphone gets a similar focused high-impact bass response with a peaky hill-shape bass response.

2. Around which frequency the bass response peaks at. For maximum impact, you want it to peak at the border between sub and midbass (+upper bass if you want, but I prefer to just speak about sub & midbass so that when I speak of midbass I mean the entire bassrange above the subbass range) to get equal amount of both. From my testing over the years, it seems when they both are in balance, the impact is ideal. From my experience this goes at about 80Hz.

3. Which affects the impact to a lesser extent but still noteworthy would be reverb. The drier or the less reverby the bass is, the more impact is felt due to the reason the reverb makes the response more diffuze but the quantity bass is percieved bigger though but "muddier" (again you want as focused bass response as possible for maximum impact). A too dry bass response will sound unnatural though due to you're being used to the reverbs happening everywhere, especially with speakers in rooms. Reverb also helps to give it a smooth flow so some reverb is always welcome but too much and it will hurt the impact. Very noticeable in mastering too, reverb helps the music flow smoother but too much will worsen impact.

A bit offtopic but couldn't resist bringing it up on your question. So to get back to your response regarding XB800 vs Pro900, a big reason behind why XB800's bass sounds muddier in this case (I've also demoed it myself so can confirm it being the case) is that the bass boost is more "wide" and there's more reverb in it.

XB800/900 measurement for comparison:

 
post #9012 of 11259
Quote:
Originally Posted by RPGWiZaRD View Post
 

Thought I'd share my lengthy post I posted in another thread that belongs to this club. :)
 

It was a good post.

 

Personally I found the bass aspect of the Pro 900 to be rather exaggerated and overrated. It was bassy, but I had a hard time satisfying my needs with it, and it was prone to rattling as well (when you EQ it). But I personally like quantity and extension. Furthermore, if you look at those grey lines, it means that its bass is very sensitive to positioning. In the wrong position, it was just an enigmatic mess. In the end I sold it, as it just didn't sound good to me with the majority of music.

post #9013 of 11259
Quote:
Originally Posted by Coq de Combat View Post
 

It was a good post.

 

Personally I found the bass aspect of the Pro 900 to be rather exaggerated and overrated. It was bassy, but I had a hard time satisfying my needs with it, and it was prone to rattling as well (when you EQ it). But I personally like quantity and extension. Furthermore, if you look at those grey lines, it means that its bass is very sensitive to positioning. In the wrong position, it was just an enigmatic mess. In the end I sold it, as it just didn't sound good to me with the majority of music.


Well it's a question of personal taste, what I talked about is simply what gets you maximum bass impact when the beat drops. The invisible psychoaustic "thud" sound that provide sense of impact. You sound like you're more into the "wrooooom" than "thud" (read out loud with a emphasize on the "th") in simple terms. :p  I like to have maximum of that "th" character in the bass response so that drums and electronic bass beats have maximum sense of punchiness (feeling of the bass beat "pounds"). A headphone that does this well without being overly big in bass would be Sennheiser HD25-II for example. 

The point here is I'd guess probably 75% would guess a linear flat boosted bass response from like 150~200Hz down to 0Hz would provide maximum impact when I claim that's not the case but a hill-shaped peaky response centered around 80Hz brings more impactful bass response.


Edited by RPGWiZaRD - 2/10/14 at 5:05am
post #9014 of 11259
Quote:
Originally Posted by RPGWiZaRD View Post
 


Well it's a question of personal taste, what I talked about is simply what gets you maximum bass impact when the beat drops. The invisible psychoaustic "thud" sound that provide sense of impact. You sound like you're more into the "wrooooom" than "thud" (read out loud with a emphasize on the "t") in simple terms. :p  I like to have maximum of that "th" character in the bass response so that drums and electronic bass beats have maximum sense of punchiness. A headphone that does this well without being overly big in bass would be Sennheiser HD25-II for example. 

I got that :) My second paragraph was more of a personal opinion on the Pro 900 in general rather than a continuation or addendum to your post.

 

Yeah, I'm probably more of a wrooomy guy than a thud, especially when listening to trap and hiphop, however I enjoy the thud life as well. It really depends on music and mood, but since I listen mostly to trap and hiphop, I think the wrooomy bass fits me better the majority of the time. Also yes, the HD25-1 II is a really punchy headphone with a big "thud" without a "wroomy" bass. As for the Pro 900, it was a weird headphone for me. One third of my music sounded good with it, and the rest didn't. I'm guessing it's due a lot of factors, but I can imagine the treble spike and the higher mids ringing issues being a part of it along with that infamous dip in the mids. An ultrasone enigma.


Edited by Coq de Combat - 2/10/14 at 5:13am
post #9015 of 11259
Quote:
Originally Posted by Coq de Combat View Post
 

I got that :) My second paragraph was more of a personal opinion on the Pro 900 in general rather than a continuation or addendum to your post.

 

Yeah, I'm probably more of a wrooomy guy than a thud, especially when listening to trap and hiphop, however I enjoy the thud life as well. It really depends on music and mood, but since I listen mostly to trap and hiphop, I think the wrooomy bass fits me better the majority of the time. Also yes, the HD25-1 II is a really punchy headphone with a big "thud" without a "wroomy" bass. As for the Pro 900, it was a weird headphone for me. One third of my music sounded good with it, and the rest didn't. I'm guessing it's due a lot of factors, but I can imagine the treble spike and the higher mids ringing issues being a part of it along with that infamous dip in the mids. An ultrasone enigma.


Yes I don't like the Ultrasone Pro900 at all myself either but I like its bass characteristics. The Q40 offers pretty similar bass but better balanced mids & highs why I prefer it over the Pro900 even if it's ~3x cheaper where I live.


Edited by RPGWiZaRD - 2/10/14 at 5:17am
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
This thread is locked