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The Basshead Club - Page 533

post #7981 of 11221
Quote:
Originally Posted by White Lotus View Post
 

OOH! I love when we talk DT770. I can't talk about them much, because there is some weird stigma about them.. People love complaining about them.

 

But of all the headphones I've ever heard/tried, I have to admit, they are in my top three. They are absolutely mind-blowing.

(IMHO)

 

Agreed.  I've never owned them (for some unknown reason, because I like them every time to demo them), but they are truly great headphones for bass-heads and those who want some "fun" in their music.  They do not pair well with all types of music but for Funk, Soul, Hip-Hop/Rap, EDM, Downtempo and most Pop music they're really good.

 

I think that they get crapped-on because we now live in a world of uber-class headphones where musical enjoyment cannot happen unless we sell our cars in order to purchase a ridiculously expensive top-tier set of cans (sarcasm of course).

 

Don't get me wrong, I love listening to crazy-expensive gear... especially when it's not my own.  I also enjoy neutral headphones without any coloration when I feel like being "analytical."  On the contrary I love my Alessandros for Rock and M-80s/750s for Hip-Hop.  The DT770 was a very high-end headphone when it came out and still has its rightful place in the Head-Fi world.  It's just been "outclassed" by more recent gear.

post #7982 of 11221
Quote:
Originally Posted by sloomingbla View Post

I understand that, i just say they are educated guesses because those differences are there, but because of all the different thongs that can effect the sound (things like sound quality... Some headphones produce certain frequencies better than others obviously, which can influence how loud/dramatic the differences are percieved)

I basically am just saying, the graph wont tell you the differences in sound.

Not that you dont know that of course.

Wall of text incoming. 

 

Well, actually there are measurements that can give you a more accurate representation of the sound. 

 

Here's some videos that you (and other people) should watch. Very informative, bar some things he didn't go over. 

Vid 1

Vid 2

Vid 3

 

Now, he didn't go over some stuff like step response, harmonic distortion, and impulse response, but those vids should show you that there are more to headphone measurements than just a frequency response chart. 

 

There are three main websites that do measurements on headphones, Goldenears, Headroom, and Innerfidelity. All of them test with different equipment, and they test different aspects of the headphones. If all three of those websites reviewed the same pair of headphone, you should really get a good idea of how they sound, given you know how to interpret the graphs. 

 

The things that Goldenears and Innerfidelity does different is the impulse response. Impulse response tests the speed of the drivers, and the higher and longer the ripple is, the slower the driver is, generally. You want the ripple to be a small and short as possible because that will determine the driver has good speed. The speed of the drivers help with the transparency, imaging, and soundstage performance. 

 

Then you have Goldenear's step response, which is basically Headroom's and Innerfidelity's 50Hz square wave (it may be a different frequency, but they're bound to be in the same ballpark). Ideally, you want the square wave to look like a square, but there are many factors that make it look differently, as described in the aforementioned videos. Earpads are the main determiner. If you have poor sealing earpads, and clamping force isn't there to keep the headphones secure on your head, then you won't be able to get good bass performance, which means a poor square wave. The main reason why the LCD series has good bass performance is because their earpads seal very well around your ears, though the clamping force could be a bit more. Poor sealing earpads and a weak clamp will give you a steep square wave because you loose a lot of the pressure from the bass in those leaks.

 

Then, you have THD (total harmonic distortion). When you produce a sine wave at, let's say, 300Hz, headphones don't perfectly produce that frequency. There will be some other frequencies that are also being played, called harmonics. Generally, you want those harmonics to be a low as possible because you just want the harmonic of that one frequency played, not any others. This test basically measures the clarity of the drivers. It also measures the ability of the headphones to reproduce the sound at a given volume level. Usually, the louder the headphones get, the more distortion there will be. Having a low harmonic distortion is the ability to cleanly reproduce the sound without having interference from other frequencies. Now, THD is usually going to be a very low percentage, so these may only be noticeable by the measurements of audio equipment, and not noticeable by the human ear, but in some cases, if it goes above 1%, you might be able to hear it. Compare the 50 Hz harmonic distortion between the LCD2 and the D2000, and you'll see that there is much more harmonic distortion at the lower frequencies on the D2000 (going over 10% THD), whereas the THD on the LCD2 is pretty much under 1% throughout the whole range. Since the THD on the low frequencies is much lower on the LCD2, you will have a cleaner, less flabby sounding bass on the LCD2 than on the D2000, and that will stay the same the louder and the more power you pump through the headphones. The lower the THD can also cue you on how much power a headphone is able to handle. If the harmonic distortion is high in the lower frequencies, that usually means that the headphones can't take a lot of power, and/or they don't need a lot of power in order to be driven. 

 

I didn't go over everything in the greatest amount of detail, but these resources should help out if you, or anyone else, is interested. 

Innerfidelity - Square Wave Response 

Goldenears - How Earpads Affect Sound

Goldenears - How to Read Measurements

post #7983 of 11221
Quote:
Originally Posted by Malevolent View Post
 

 

The M50 isn't very good for EDM. The DT770 is a much better headphone for dance music, featuring prominent highs and relatively good bass quality (and certainly more bass). I would have to attenuate the highs a little to fully enjoy the DT770, but it is definitely the more engaging headphone for EDM.

 

Well I'd say it's a matter of taste, I quickly sold my DT770 Pro because I thought the midrange was too pushed back and it lacked midbass (so the bass wasn't very punchy, only rumbly and ooooh so rumbly but simply too much subbass skewed for my taste) so I couldn't get engaged with music but then again I have preference in up-front mids and balanced midbass and subbass presence and yes I'm like 90% EDM music listener. :) I slightly prefer M50 myself but the M50 I had didn't sound anything like the description I read about them so I really believe in the two different versions of M50 floating around. The M50 I had was pretty weak in bass (even boosting it a lot didn't get me satisfied) but had very nice mids which I liked about them but the highs were also very slightly too sharp, there around 9kHz or so.

 


Edited by RPGWiZaRD - 10/29/13 at 3:34pm
post #7984 of 11221
Quote:
Originally Posted by RPGWiZaRD View Post

Well I'd say it's a matter of taste, I quickly sold my DT770 Pro because I thought the midrange was too pushed back and it lacked midbass (so the bass wasn't very punchy, only rumbly and ooooh so rumbly but simply too much subbass skewed for my taste) so I couldn't get engaged with music but then again I have preference in up-front mids and balanced midbass and subbass presence and yes I'm like 90% EDM music listener. smily_headphones1.gif I slightly prefer M50 myself but the M50 I had didn't sound anything like the description I read about them so I really believe in the two different versions of M50 floating around. The M50 I had was pretty weak in bass (even boosting it a lot didn't get me satisfied) but had very nice mids which I liked about them but the highs were also very slightly too sharp, there around 9kHz or so.


 

My m50's are like that too. When I read about them before buying them, everyone was talking about how bassy they are, I was quite shocked when I got them that they didn't have enough bass for me. Mine is the white box version, which is said to be more neutral than the previous blue box version. It still has a recessed midrange though.
Edited by xkonfuzed - 10/30/13 at 6:03am
post #7985 of 11221

People sometimes do say that the M50 is a "basshead" can, but I don't personally see it.

post #7986 of 11221
M50 can be consider as agressive bassy headphone! It is not totally flat folks, the cheaper headphone that is cheaper is HD449! And flat headphone is also HD600.
post #7987 of 11221
Quote:
Originally Posted by iSennheiser View Post

M50 can be consider as agressive bassy headphone! It is not totally flat folks, the cheaper headphone that is cheaper is HD449! And flat headphone is also HD600.


Comparatively speaking, the M50 is tame for the basshead club. 

post #7988 of 11221

My DT770 just arrived. With so much excitement i plug it in to my E7 (because its 250 ohms) and fired up my music player.

FIrst I listed to Spotify and my excitement went down. The volume is to LOW. My E7 is already on 30-40 volume and the sound is to low compared to my M50's. Same thing when i fired up iTunes and Fidelia. I used to have only 20 on volume on my M50. Is this normal for the DT770? Will the audio will improve after the break-in?

post #7989 of 11221
The more ohms, the harder it is to drive.

I would recommend getting an e11, it would help alot more
post #7990 of 11221
Quote:
Originally Posted by sloomingbla View Post

The more ohms, the harder it is to drive.

I would recommend getting an e11, it would help alot more

E12 would be even better

post #7991 of 11221

Is it possible to buy a Fiio E9 amp to dock my E7? Will it work? Because they are on the same price range buying E11 or E12.

post #7992 of 11221
Quote:
Originally Posted by Craigster75 View Post

E12 would be even better
Or an anedio d2 :3
post #7993 of 11221
Quote:
Originally Posted by iceman600 View Post
 

Is it possible to buy a Fiio E9 amp to dock my E7? Will it work? Because they are on the same price range buying E11 or E12.

 

Yes, that will work, and will provide sufficient power.

 

Keep in mind, however, that it won't be a portable solution. 

post #7994 of 11221

I'm currently listening to the Fiio X3 and the V-Moda M100, I think it's a great combo for bass heavy music. Both the player and the headphones have a bass hump, and I rarely have to turn the bass up beyond 75%.

 

post #7995 of 11221

Atomic Floyd Superdarts should be added to the list - they are basically the TF10 + Deeper Bass and a little more relaxed on the treble. Fun IEMs

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