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The Basshead Club - Page 512  

post #7666 of 11259
Quote:
Originally Posted by White Lotus View Post
 

Maybe for the flat-bass for under $500 seekers, the HE-400 is the way to go?

 

I have to admit, I'm still wary about pulling the trigger on the HE-400. Everytime I do, I worry about the reports of painful sibilance. 

I just want a headphone with great sub-bass, as well as mid-bass.

It shouldn't be too difficult to EQ sibilance out without loosing much.

post #7667 of 11259
Quote:
Originally Posted by White Lotus View Post
 

Maybe for the flat-bass for under $500 seekers, the HE-400 is the way to go?

 

I have to admit, I'm still wary about pulling the trigger on the HE-400. Everytime I do, I worry about the reports of painful sibilance. 

I just want a headphone with great sub-bass, as well as mid-bass.

Go for a used pair of D5000's then...............you know you want to!

post #7668 of 11259

Actually, I have some D5000 already.. Like what I've found with most dynamic cans, the mid-bass is more prominent than the sub-bass.


But an excellent suggestion nonetheless! 

post #7669 of 11259
Quote:
Originally Posted by In Over My Head View Post
 

It shouldn't be too difficult to EQ sibilance out without loosing much.

 

i disagree... i tried to eq the sibilance out of my dt 770s and found it quite impossible...

Quote:
Originally Posted by White Lotus View Post
 

Actually, I have some D5000 already.. Like what I've found with most dynamic cans, the mid-bass is more prominent than the sub-bass.


But an excellent suggestion nonetheless! 

 

why not eq?

post #7670 of 11259
Quote:
Originally Posted by White Lotus View Post
 

Actually, I have some D5000 already.. Like what I've found with most dynamic cans, the mid-bass is more prominent than the sub-bass.


But an excellent suggestion nonetheless! 

LOTUS WHERE DO U LIVE ... IN AUSTRAILLA... you suck man. I would TOTALLY let you demo my 400 in exchagne for ur D5k but PFF those Shipping rates and that shipping TIME q.q sorry... u need to move to the USA 

 

That said, I'm interested in a D5k.... I need a Closed Sub Bass [ish] Can 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by adamlr View Post
 

 

i disagree... i tried to eq the sibilance out of my dt 770s and found it quite impossible...

 

why not eq?

yea, see what I mean. Your ears are CURSED sorry :3

post #7671 of 11259
Try this?
http://www.head-fi.org/t/685071/best-de-essing-plugins-to-improve-sq-and-decrease-fatigue
Quote:
Originally Posted by adamlr View Post

i disagree... i tried to eq the sibilance out of my dt 770s and found it quite impossible...
post #7672 of 11259
Quote:
Originally Posted by adamlr View Post
 

 

i disagree... i tried to eq the sibilance out of my dt 770s and found it quite impossible...

 

why not eq?

If a headphone is sibilant, it is usually a flaw with the headphone unless 128K or less files are used.  Using EQ to mask a headphone deficiency like sibilance also removes sound from those frequencies where one wants to hear them.  I avoid any headphone that produces sibilance since I find it too distracting to truly enjoy listening through them.

post #7673 of 11259
Quote:
Originally Posted by Oregonian View Post


As gelocks said, not a basshead can. That said, I do have high hopes the AD, fed by a vintage amp, has enough to satisfy. Skeptical but hopeful. Yet not holding my breath.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Craigster75 View Post
 

Based on what I have read on the Alpha Dog thread, the AD has even less bass.

 

Yup.

I haven't played with the "Vary-bass" function yet though... Bass is linear, very clean, but it seems the little bump in mid-bass from the original Mad Dogs is gone and it doesn't feel as warm either so, on it's "default" setting I find the Alpha Dogs to be lighter on bass than the Mad Dogs. That said, they DO go down (I can feel it on 15Hz and 20Hz and start hearing bass "tone" at 25Hz). The sound of these is extremely pleasant though, just not bass-head worthy.

post #7674 of 11259
Quote:
Originally Posted by Craigster75 View Post
 

If a headphone is sibilant, it is usually a flaw with the headphone unless 128K or less files are used.  Using EQ to mask a headphone deficiency like sibilance also removes sound from those frequencies where one wants to hear them.  I avoid any headphone that produces sibilance since I find it too distracting to truly enjoy listening through them.

 

Not completely right. It doesn't remove that frequency range, it just makes the part that you're equalizing quieter. Removing sibilance basically means flattening out the treble spike(s) in the headphones. You're not masking the sound, or degrading the sound quality or anything like that. It's basically bringing, let's say, a 5dB spike at 10kHz, down to 0dB. 

 

Just for reference, that low quality sound you hear with poorly recorded files (i.e. your average 128K file) is called aliasing.

 

On Beyer's DT lineup, there's usually a recession at around 3-5kHz, and large spike at around 10kHz. That's the reason why some people say that they have a recessed midrange and a sparkly, sometimes artificial, treble. Not to mention, the treble spike has a tendency of overpowering the middle frequencies, thus making them sound even more recessed. 

post #7675 of 11259
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trae View Post
 

 

Not completely right. It doesn't remove that frequency range, it just makes the part that you're equalizing quieter. Removing sibilance basically means flattening out the treble spike(s) in the headphones. You're not masking the sound, or degrading the sound quality or anything like that. It's basically bringing, let's say, a 5dB spike at 10kHz, down to 0dB. 

 

Just for reference, that low quality sound you hear with poorly recorded files (i.e. your average 128K file) is called aliasing.

 

On Beyer's DT lineup, there's usually a recession at around 3-5kHz, and large spike at around 10kHz. That's the reason why some people say that they have a recessed midrange and a sparkly, sometimes artificial, treble. Not to mention, the treble spike has a tendency of overpowering the middle frequencies, thus making them sound even more recessed. 

 

On my ears, smoothing out the treble spikes with targetted parametric EQ went 30% of the way towards eliminating sibilance while on-the-fly de-essing processing (as linked in my previous post) completed the other 70% of the journey.  But either way is better than playing headphone switcheroo and praying :)

post #7676 of 11259
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mshenay View Post
 

yea, see what I mean. Your ears are CURSED sorry :3

 

ha! you may be right, i must get some brownie points for perseverance though :tongue_smile:

 

thanks for that, but ive given up on the 770s long ago... i use them for watching movies and series and stuff, and my m-100 for music. its all good.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Craigster75 View Post
 

If a headphone is sibilant, it is usually a flaw with the headphone unless 128K or less files are used.  Using EQ to mask a headphone deficiency like sibilance also removes sound from those frequencies where one wants to hear them.  I avoid any headphone that produces sibilance since I find it too distracting to truly enjoy listening through them.

 

to be fair, the 770s arent THAT sibilant, just a little... but yea i get what your saying. and all my music is atleast 320 kbps or higher, except for the very very old stuff - which i dont really listen to that much anymore. 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Trae View Post
 

 

Not completely right. It doesn't remove that frequency range, it just makes the part that you're equalizing quieter. Removing sibilance basically means flattening out the treble spike(s) in the headphones. You're not masking the sound, or degrading the sound quality or anything like that. It's basically bringing, let's say, a 5dB spike at 10kHz, down to 0dB. 

 

Just for reference, that low quality sound you hear with poorly recorded files (i.e. your average 128K file) is called aliasing.

 

On Beyer's DT lineup, there's usually a recession at around 3-5kHz, and large spike at around 10kHz. That's the reason why some people say that they have a recessed midrange and a sparkly, sometimes artificial, treble. Not to mention, the treble spike has a tendency of overpowering the middle frequencies, thus making them sound even more recessed. 

 

i found a massive spike at around 7 KHz with the 770s, and another smaller spike at around 5 KHz, but finding the center of the spike and tuning it down was really hard. once i was done, the fatigue i got from them was significantly mitigated, but the sibilance was still there. sibilance can occur on such a wide range of frequencies, i admit i kinda gave up after a few tries, theres just too much to work with. but like i said, the dt 770s still get used quite often - just not for music... its not all lost for them

post #7677 of 11259
Quote:
Originally Posted by gelocks View Post
 

 

 

Yup.

I haven't played with the "Vary-bass" function yet though... Bass is linear, very clean, but it seems the little bump in mid-bass from the original Mad Dogs is gone and it doesn't feel as warm either so, on it's "default" setting I find the Alpha Dogs to be lighter on bass than the Mad Dogs. That said, they DO go down (I can feel it on 15Hz and 20Hz and start hearing bass "tone" at 25Hz). The sound of these is extremely pleasant though, just not bass-head worthy.

 

NOT AS WARM... omigawd yes! 

post #7678 of 11259

Hello I have a question; I’m  listen on average an hour or 6 per day to mostly instrumental progressive Rock, Fusion, Metal, Djent, Electronic Rock/Metal, and everything in between in it, and occasionally progressive Metal with a singer and sometimes Rap or Funk(the old stuff, for example Tone Loc, Zapp or Brass Construction..number 5 is a good album :p )

I have a Samsung Galaxy player 5.0 and listen with my XB500 to all those heavy **** in mp3 320 and 256 kBit/s  and only use the EQ  for my headphone and my music sounds than very great with a ocean full of bass in it (I'm a Basshead :p ) btw instrumental Metal, Rock, Djent  and so, sounds super with much bass through the Sony XB500.

Only my problem is that my XB500 through excessive use is now just about starts to fall apart, the XB500 durability holds not for a long time, about 2 ½ years (built quality is poor from the Sony XB500 imo) So I am looking for another headphone. But which one?  It must be a headphone with a lot of bass, and must run easily on my Galaxy player 5.0 . Maybe V-Moda LP, LP2 or M100 but sounds the V-Moda’s good with instrumental Rock, Metal, Djent?. Or maybe the Beyer DT-770 pro 32 ohms edetion?  The XB500 is heavy bass and sounds in your face, I like that. So guys what are you advise me for headphone with a lot of bass for my music taste

 

:wink_face:

post #7679 of 11259
Quote:
Originally Posted by Meck View Post
 

 a ocean full of bass in it

 

...Take me to your ocean. I wish to swim inside it.

post #7680 of 11259

^^  Not nude may I hope  :tongue_smile:

 

:o2smile:

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