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Why you shouldn't do Grado mods in a hurry

post #1 of 19
Thread Starter 
So I was installing my wire mesh screens that I got from tenzip, and though I didn't have much time I thought i'd just get it done anyway.

Well, I assume that I somehow bent the outer plastic rim with a hair dryer, which I assume I can repair with a headphone dryer (or have an excuse to buy wood or metal casings)

Then when I put the casing back together on the non-bent casing, I closed it too fast and stripped the wire. Guess that gives me a reason to upgrade the cable. Any other stories like this?
post #2 of 19

Heated up the right cups too much too quickly, did some work on it, went to work on the left cup, went back to working on the right cup, tried to put it back together but it wouldn't fit. Upper cup shrunk to be slightly smaller than the lower cup that contains the drivers. I had to reheat the upper cup and reshape it by hand and force the upper cup and lower cup back together while it's hot. 

 

lol.

post #3 of 19

Took a heat gun and melted the mesh...

 

):

 

Replacing with copper mesh though! It's not even that bad but still pisses me off when I look at it. I always underestimate a heat gun should have used a hair dryer or something.

 

Lesson learned.

post #4 of 19
Thread Starter 
Yeah, I actually used a hair dryer, didn't think it could get THAT hot.
post #5 of 19

I used a hairdryer to melt away the plastic grill and then I filed down the extra shard edges... Now my SR60s don't have a grill and I like it this way but the grado ring (with the lettering) on the right cup popped out and shrank. 

 

D:

post #6 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by JoeWP View Post

So I was installing my wire mesh screens that I got from tenzip, and though I didn't have much time I thought i'd just get it done anyway.
Well, I assume that I somehow bent the outer plastic rim with a hair dryer, which I assume I can repair with a headphone dryer (or have an excuse to buy wood or metal casings)
Then when I put the casing back together on the non-bent casing, I closed it too fast and stripped the wire. Guess that gives me a reason to upgrade the cable. Any other stories like this?

I'd chalk it up as an excuse to get one of the beautiful wood mods man. Go for it!
Those things are essentially art and there are a lot of people who will make them for you.
post #7 of 19
Thread Starter 
Yeah, I got everything back up to snuff this morning. Re-formed the casing, cut and soldered the wire. I've looked at Martin custom audio. He does the wood mods for $90 - $120. Any other people I should consider?

Thanks!
Joe
post #8 of 19

Sorry you had trouble with it, glad you got it back together OK.

 

A hair dryer will get hotter than most people realize.  A heat gun is just a hair dryer with extra or beefier heating elements, and usually a lower speed fan.

post #9 of 19

driver diaphragm melted when using an industrial heater gun to remove the plastic shells. plastic shells deformed as well.

 

57d0bd18_IMG_0329.JPG

 

Now I use a regular hair dryer.

post #10 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by JamesMcProgger View Post

driver diaphragm melted when using an industrial heater gun to remove the plastic shells. plastic shells deformed as well.

.....

Now I use a regular hair dryer.


If that's what you used, I am not surprised of the result.

I think a slightly milder approach would have been more appropriate (...reconfirming my thought...).

Does it now work with the regular hairdryer?  


Edited by TheDreamthinker - 10/3/11 at 3:00pm
post #11 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheDreamthinker View Post

If that's what you used, I am not surprised of the result.

I think a slightly milder approach would have been more appropriate (...reconfirming my thought...).

Does it now work with the regular hairdryer?  



Yes, regular hairdryer is better, but you still have to be careful not to heat for too long in the same spot. is like roasting a rabbit in a bonefire: rotate continuously.

post #12 of 19

May I ask why people like moding Grados?

Is it easier, does it improve the sound more than with other headphones?

 

Thank you.

post #13 of 19

Lots of room for potential improvement - especially when starting from the SR60/SR80 (also, relatively inexpensive entry point... low risk - if you totally screw up, you are only out $80 and time), Low technical ability required. Wide variety of mods from very simple to ground up rebuilds, and different types of mods to adjust sound per personal preference.

post #14 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheDreamthinker View Post

May I ask why people like moding Grados?

Is it easier, does it improve the sound more than with other headphones?

 

Thank you.



it improve sthe sound, no doubt, and yes it is easier to re-make a grado than most headphones.

 

the whole grado mechanism and body is simple. and the cups round and small. and the big plus for me, they can look awesome.

 

Martin custom SR80 by JMcP.jpeg

 

Bought some Martin custom cocobolo cups, I made the rest. check out his work, who wouldnt like to have one of those nice looking grados in his collection.

post #15 of 19

Grados are (relatively) primitive and easily modable.

That's why some people say that Grados aren't worth it.

 

Just out of curiosity, do they all use the same drivers?

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