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post #31 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by nikp View Post

Get your facts right. Since when is current measured in Ohms? That is resistance. 

 

 

my bad I meant "resistance" high resistance means more "current" is flowing through... or the opposite is true, low current = lower resistance 

post #32 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by nw130d View Post

 

my bad I meant "resistance" high resistance means more "current" is flowing through... or the opposite is true, low current = lower resistance 


Then again, you need to get your facts right. Higher resistance means less current going through. Lower resistance allows more current to pass through. Think of it this way, resistance is like bouncers that blocks you from entering an alleyway. More bouncers = less people that can get through = less flow.

 

post #33 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by nikp View Post

Then again, you need to get your facts right. Higher resistance means less current going through. Lower resistance allows more current to pass through. Think of it this way, resistance is like bouncers that blocks you from entering an alleyway. More bouncers = less people that can get through = less flow.

 



lol no this time I am fine. Current (I) going throw a gauge x length: cause a value of resistance(R)... thinner the wire + longer the length of wire cause a higher resistance OR more current you can put through the wire also cause a higher resistance (R)

 

post #34 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by nw130d View Post

lol no this time I am fine. Current (I) going throw a gauge x length: cause a value of resistance(R)... thinner the wire + longer the length of wire cause a higher resistance OR more current you can put through the wire also cause a higher resistance (R)

 


I=V/R More resistance, less current. I think what you're trying to say is the opposing current which is resistance. 

 

post #35 of 68

I = V/R    

 

I and R ...one goes up the other goes up... one goes down other goes down.

 

I and R... higher the current (I) higher the resistance (R)... lower the current (I) lower the resistance (R)

 

 

 

 

change in current (I) results a change in resistance (R)...... a change in R (what you stated) does not necessarily imply (I) has to change. physical factor like cable thickness, length, cable material, temp... all can change R 

 

"opposing current" has nothing to do with this... are you trying to say AC power?


Edited by nw130d - 10/3/11 at 5:53pm
post #36 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by nw130d View Post

I = V/R    

 

I and R ...one goes up the other goes up... one goes down other goes down.

 

I and R... higher the current (I) higher the resistance (R)... lower the current (I) lower the resistance (R)

 

 

 

 

change in current (I) results a change in resistance (R)...... a change in R (what you stated) does not necessarily imply (I) has to change. physical factor like cable thickness, length, cable material, temp... all can change R 

 

"opposing current" has nothing to do with this... are you trying to say AC power?


I would argue with you no more. 

 

post #37 of 68

agreed, lets just see who gets backed up...

post #38 of 68

http://www.furryelephant.com/player.php?subject=physics&jumpTo=ee/7Ms4

 

This is an explanation of how electricity works. You are the first person that says that current is directly related to resistance.

post #39 of 68

lol thanks but I don't need a furry elephant to teach me physics

 

lower the resistance, higher the current <---(this is what you said and it can be right!!! but you have just focus on this one statement where ever you learned this... there is a 3rd variable)

 

that 1st statement is right but DOES NOT make mine; this 2nd statement wrong

 

high current cause the high resistance (given all other factors are equal, eg same wire gauge) <--- this is also right

faster something flows the more resistance there is to slow it down... if you put 220V of voltage through a wire all is dandy. Use the same wire and put 800V of electrical potential energy, that wire heats up and melts and catches on fire, why? high voltage means each electron have high energy to push at a great force trough the wire, this faster flowing electrons is subjected to more resistance when they try to pass matter and gives off heat.

 

not sure what your education background is or how long you graduated but that is just how it works... if you feel like you too have graduated high school and taken 3rd year uni physics recently, message me I am sure we have some things in common and we can chat physics... cheers

post #40 of 68

This battle is hilarious, even busting out credentials... one things for sure neither of you is gonna be teaching physics or actually EE anytime soon cause your explanations are more confusing than original questions. still worth thispopcorn.gif

 

To the OP just get the pros it will be easier for you deal with and just enjoy the music. I don't think you will get upgraditis too soon either.

post #41 of 68

Heya,
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Wyatta4 View Post

And what is the difference between the PRO version, 32 OHM, 250OHM, and 600 OHM models?..
 

 

Miniscule differences. I would suggest not worrying about it, and rather, get one that suits your budget and other equipment as a whole.

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by Wyatta4 View Post

Do you have all of these headphones? 

 


Yea, heh. It's kind of embarrassing outside of this forum I suppose.

 

Very best,

post #42 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by nw130d View Post

 

high current cause the high resistance (given all other factors are equal, eg same wire gauge) <--- this is also right

faster something flows the more resistance there is to slow it down... if you put 220V of voltage through a wire all is dandy. Use the same wire and put 800V of electrical potential energy, that wire heats up and melts and catches on fire, why? high voltage means each electron have high energy to push at a great force trough the wire, this faster flowing electrons is subjected to more resistance when they try to pass matter and gives off heat.

 

 

Here is my 2 cent.

If both headphone were to use the same wire gauge, higher current would create a higher resistance but at the same  time it would cause the wire to short. But a lower current should not cause the internal resistance of the wire to drop.

 

Waiting to see how this end popcorn.gif

post #43 of 68


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Wyatta4 View Post

And what is the difference between the PRO version, 32 OHM, 250OHM, and 600 OHM models?....

 

A headphone with lower ohms is easier to drive.

 

post #44 of 68

http://headphones.com.au/forums/viewtopic.php?f=2&t=5786

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by nikp View Post

 

 

A headphone with lower ohms is easier to drive.

 

 

post #45 of 68

http://www.physics.uoguelph.ca/phyjlh/Fendt/phe/ohmslaw.htm

 

Another applet. This time, it's from the physics department of a Canadian university. Play around with it. Try lowering and increasing the resistance - see if the current goes up or down. normal_smile%20.gif

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