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Why do people like bass so much? - Page 7

post #91 of 177

This is roughly the frequency response I'd like, (the bass could probably be higher still but then the mids/highs have to follow a little too)

 

eqcurve3.jpg


Edited by RPGWiZaRD - 10/2/11 at 1:42am
post #92 of 177
Quote:
Originally Posted by RPGWiZaRD View Post

This is roughly the frequency response I'd like, (the bass could probably be higher still)

 

eqcurve3.jpg



Reverse that slope and that is what i like.

post #93 of 177
Quote:
Originally Posted by bcasey25raptor View Post

Reverse that slope and that is what i like.


Did you ever try a pair of Grado, those seems the closest to what you want. Maybe SR325 or RS1.

 


Edited by RPGWiZaRD - 10/2/11 at 1:53am
post #94 of 177
Quote:
Originally Posted by RPGWiZaRD View Post

Did you ever try a pair of Grado, those seems the closest to what you want. Maybe SR325 or RS1.

 



Listening to grados right now thank you very much.

post #95 of 177
I love grado's as well. But back to the original post, I think bass is so popular because it gives us visceral enjoyment. It speaks to our human ancestry, i.e. dancing and drumming in ancient africa.
post #96 of 177
Quote:
Originally Posted by philofthepresnt View Post

I love grado's as well. But back to the original post, I think bass is so popular because it gives us visceral enjoyment. It speaks to our human ancestry, i.e. dancing and drumming in ancient africa.

More then likely.
post #97 of 177
Quote:
Originally Posted by bcasey25raptor View Post





Reverse that slope and that is what i like.


That's a loud FR preference honestly. Like a loudness war in headphone form. Not that it's that bad, but it's a fatiguing/exciting sound.
post #98 of 177
Quote:
Originally Posted by wind016 View Post

That's a loud FR preference honestly. Like a loudness war in headphone form. Not that it's that bad, but it's a fatiguing/exciting sound.
Quote:
I like my frequency response graphs to look like your going up a hill. Bass is the bottom of the hill. Mids are the hill itself. And the treble around 8khz is the top of the hill. Then after 8khz i like it to slightly drop down. I like treble a lot for some reason wen most people can't stand it. Bass just feels like it drowns out everything else to much. I am basing this off of the shure se215 and shure srh750dj which both had recessed vocals and guitars. I want vocals and guitars to be up front with drums and bass guitar to be slightly quieter. I have yet to hear a bassy headphone where i feel like the mids and treble isn't being muted.

As you can see that is my preference. Give or take a few dips here and there. Like have a slight dip at 4khz would be nice but having a spike at 8/9 khz that is sudden annoys me. If there is going to be a spike it should happen gradually.
post #99 of 177
Quote:
Originally Posted by ph0rk View Post

Music is boring without percussion, a rhythm.

 

Percussion needs a little oomph.

 

Further, many instruments can produce sounds into the bass registers, even a guitar, voice, or cello. They sound better when you don't have rolloff at 100 hz, if you ask me.


+1

 

post #100 of 177

 

I love bass. A real deep quality bass. I listen to a wide variety of music - Jazz, Soul, Blues, Zydeco, African, Latin, Classic and so on. And many tracks in these genres can suffer one or two things and sometimes both: realistic deep bass information left on the cutting room/mixing floor; bass-light headphones rollin' deep bass up & out of the cans. Artificially, I might add. The previous poster had it right when mentioning how deep bass can have an impact on percussion and other instruments.

 

I found a welcoming article (finally!) on the subject of deep bass.

 

http://www.positive-feedback.com/Issue55/bass.htm

post #101 of 177

I think people like bass because low notes convey a sense of power and presence.

 

Listen to the theme music for the Empire off the Star Wars soundtrack.  Now do it with no bass.  Now do it again with no treble.  Many regard that to be one of the most powerful tunes ever composed and without the depth and presence of the horns and strings it falls flat on it's face.

 

Listen to "All of Me" by John Schmidt.  The tune is in the middle registers but the presence really arrives when the low notes do.

 

I will postulate that infrasonic waves are pretty sweet stuff, and they're below the range of human hearing and directly in the range of human feeling.

 

Attended a Pendulum concert in which there was a rotary woofer present for flushing out the bass notes.  The venue had to undergo repairs to the acoustic batting which was stuck to the ceiling as the quantity and quality of the bass were both high enough to shake chunks off.  Try that with treble! :D

 

Go look up the Matterhorn around the web, makes other subs look like toys.  A sub built by the DoD, that has such infrasonic potential that when it was placed at the Los Angeles Convention Center the building architect would only allow (I recall) 20 amps to the sucker because he felt that for the frequencies it was designed to produce at even a percentage of the volume it was designed to produce them at, it could have brought the convention center down.  If you look around you can find folks impressions from standing in the opening of this sonic dreadnought, and they're well worth the read.

 

 

post #102 of 177

Bass is the only part within the hearing range you can actually feel. It's the easiest frequency to build engagement in (think about simple EDM music). 

It's usually very compressible music, meaning there are very little different sounds. The harder it is to compress the song, the harder it is for the brain to understand the music and find the melody/groove of the song. 

 

 

So a possible answer to your question: People like bass so much, because many genres that are very compressible, are easier to 'understand' by your brain, and often sound good with a bass boost. 

This might also explain why the more experienced music enthusiast is not a big fan of big bass.

 

Source: http://www.livescience.com/33050-what-makes-music-enjoyable.html

post #103 of 177
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marleybob217 View Post
 

Bass is the only part within the hearing range you can actually feel. It's the easiest frequency to build engagement in (think about simple EDM music). 

It's usually very compressible music, meaning there are very little different sounds. The harder it is to compress the song, the harder it is for the brain to understand the music and find the melody/groove of the song. 

 

 

So a possible answer to your question: People like bass so much, because many genres that are very compressible, are easier to 'understand' by your brain, and often sound good with a bass boost. 

This might also explain why the more experienced music enthusiast is not a big fan of big bass.

 

Source: http://www.livescience.com/33050-what-makes-music-enjoyable.html

The ability to feel the music is certainly part of the appeal, and the sensation of strength and power that comes with it.

On the last part, though, I'm a huge fan of big bass, all the way up to and including big hard-techno bass drops and dubstep--and I'm about as experienced a music enthusiast and music-maker as it is possible to be. Huge bass also works great in the opening of Strauss's "Also Sprach Zarathustra", by the way, for pretty much the same reasons it works in "Game" by Yasutaka Nakata (sung by Perfume).

post #104 of 177

Because it adds realism to the music.

 

I joke about this with ER4.  Sure the bass may extend deep but all that is extending deep is bass TONES.  If the viciseral effect is missing you might as well just be listening from a 9 transister portable radio.

post #105 of 177
Quote:
Originally Posted by UltMusicSnob View Post
 

The ability to feel the music is certainly part of the appeal, and the sensation of strength and power that comes with it.

On the last part, though, I'm a huge fan of big bass, all the way up to and including big hard-techno bass drops and dubstep--and I'm about as experienced a music enthusiast and music-maker as it is possible to be. Huge bass also works great in the opening of Strauss's "Also Sprach Zarathustra", by the way, for pretty much the same reasons it works in "Game" by Yasutaka Nakata (sung by Perfume).

 

Do you use a separate subwoofer? I find that any genre with a lot of information between the sub-bass and let's say lower-mids is going to sound very strange with a bass boost. Let's say there's a guitar playing in that region, with a bass boost the lower part of that guitar play will be boosted, while the higher part will sound recessed. That's why dubstep sounds good with a bass boost, because there is a very clean bassline, with no or little sounds/instruments/chords crossing over between the bass and mids.

 

Maybe the problem isn't as problematic when you have a dedicated subwoofer.

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