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Why do people like bass so much? - Page 3

post #31 of 177
Quote:
Originally Posted by Parall3l View Post





Not really a scientific proof be since treble are of higher frequencies I guess it should be more damaging ?



I thought it was volume which impacted hearing loss. Otherwise i would think anywhere from 1khz to 4khz would be the most damaging as thats where humans are the most sensitive.

post #32 of 177

I think we should stop talk about this since both of us don't have any scientific proof right now, its kind of derailing this thread. I'll PM you when I find something that explains everything if you want 

post #33 of 177

I'll take a great Mid range any day .....    Don't you just love the guy's/gal's who have the big BAD bass blasting in their cars.... You hear more parts of the car rattling then you actually hear any bass notes..... same for the guy's/gal's that use some sub woofers in their main systems, they're way to loud and lag behind the rest of the music....... So once again give me the glorious MID RANGE, that's were the heart of the music is anyway

post #34 of 177
Quote:
Originally Posted by Parall3l View Post

I think we should stop talk about this since both of us don't have any scientific proof right now, its kind of derailing this thread. I'll PM you when I find something that explains everything if you want 



Fair enough.

post #35 of 177
Quote:
Originally Posted by bcasey25raptor View Post





Treble for me = Guitars and Vocals

 

Guitars and Vocals for me = music.


Guitars and vocals are primarily midrange.

 

post #36 of 177
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tronz View Post




Guitars and vocals are primarily midrange.

 



Mid to high. High pitched vocals or guitars can reach into treble and if you boost the treble on a pair of headphones it makes these sound much better.

post #37 of 177
Quote:
Originally Posted by bcasey25raptor View Post

Mid to high. High pitched vocals or guitars can reach into treble and if you boost the treble on a pair of headphones it makes these sound much better.


The primary frequencies of guitars and vocal is in the lower range (roughly between 200Hz and 1,000Hz). Guitar distortion/harmonics and the higher harmonics of the human voice reach into the mid and treble ranges. Even with the highest pitched instruments in an orchestra, say the highest note on a piccolo flute, the fundamental is still below 4kHz.

G
Edited by gregorio - 9/24/11 at 4:31am
post #38 of 177
Quote:
Originally Posted by Uncle Erik View Post

I blame popular music for the bassheads. Before about 20 years ago, most popular music wasn't this heavy. Yes, there were bass guitars and kickdrums, but nothing like what we have today.

 

Most consumer-level stereos 20 years ago couldn't really reproduce bass very well, so decent bass was striking. One of the most notable things for me when I saw my first live rock performance was the bass. In my feet, in my chest, etc.

 

If you listen to the lower registers you want the whole band in balance, and if you listen quietly you want some recession in the midrange.

 

Recall a guitar's low E fundamental is around 82 hz, an electric Bass's is 41. I don't want to pretend I can hear the fundamental, I want it there.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Parall3l View Post


Not really a scientific proof be since treble are of higher frequencies I guess it should be more damaging ?


I've read in more than one place that low bass causes less overexcitement of the ear as you tend to feel it rather than hear it, which was the reasoning between the bassless dBA curve. And, of course, your earplugs aren't going to stop bass anyway.

 

We tend to be most sensitive in the midrange (as anyone who has been annoyed by a baby crying nearby can attest), and as I understand it this is where loss becomes evident first.

 

Of course, idiots with 130 dB car stereos going full blast are the exceptions that prove the rule. I have always found excess treble fatiguing, while excess bass is merely wrong.

 


Edited by ph0rk - 9/24/11 at 7:02am
post #39 of 177

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by bcasey25raptor View Post




Do you have proof to back this up?

 



http://www.american-hearing.org/disorders/noise-induced-hearing-loss/

 

"The most damaging type of sound is in the high-frequencies. Violins and violas can be sufficiently loud to cause permanent hearing loss. This is typically worse in the left ear, which is nearer the instrument."

 

 

 

ClieOS:

"Generally volume is calculated in total, but our hearing receptors are working on different principle on low and high freq. For low freq, it is the whole eardrum that pickup the vibration. For high freq, it is those tiny hair-like sensor on the back of the eardrum. So structurally speaking, the whole eardrum is a stronger structure than the tiny sensor, and make it more tolerable to volume. That is why when hearing damage happens, it usually is the high freq that is gone first."

http://www.head-fi.org/t/569876/feeling-high-frequencies#post_7725570


Edited by wind016 - 9/24/11 at 12:05pm
post #40 of 177

Quote:
Originally Posted by ph0rk View Post

Most consumer-level stereos 20 years ago couldn't really reproduce bass very well, so decent bass was striking. One of the most notable things for me when I saw my first live rock performance was the bass. In my feet, in my chest, etc.

 

If you listen to the lower registers you want the whole band in balance, and if you listen quietly you want some recession in the midrange.

 

Recall a guitar's low E fundamental is around 82 hz, an electric Bass's is 41. I don't want to pretend I can hear the fundamental, I want it there.


I've read in more than one place that low bass causes less overexcitement of the ear as you tend to feel it rather than hear it, which was the reasoning between the bassless dBA curve. And, of course, your earplugs aren't going to stop bass anyway.

 

We tend to be most sensitive in the midrange (as anyone who has been annoyed by a baby crying nearby can attest), and as I understand it this is where loss becomes evident first.

 

Of course, idiots with 130 dB car stereos going full blast are the exceptions that prove the rule. I have always found excess treble fatiguing, while excess bass is merely wrong.

 

I beg to differ with you about "Most consumer-level stereos 20 years ago couldn't really reproduce bass very well"!!!! Not True, The real JBL's and Altec "voice of the theaters" could knock your socks off with only a few "Good Tube Watts"........ The cabinets were huge and very well built, and the drivers, well check out the price of these 20 plus yr. old speakers and look at the price they're still bringing.. Another thing to remember 20 plus years ago we all had our favorite HI-FI shops that carried Great speakers, amps, Reel to Reel Decks and Turntables. There were no "Best Buy's" or your K-Mart Box complete systems like you have today.....So once again unless you are/were old enough to be "into audio equipment" you wouldn't know what was in some of these Audio Shops....I was, and holy **** most of you younger guy's wouldn't believe the great times "WE" had hanging out and listening in these shops as often as we could, and doing a lot of dreaming....
 

 

post #41 of 177
Quote:
Originally Posted by 9pintube View Post

I beg to differ with you about "Most consumer-level stereos 20 years ago couldn't really reproduce bass very well"!!!! Not True, The real JBL's and Altec "voice of the theaters" could knock your socks off with only a few "Good Tube Watts"........ The cabinets were huge and very well built, and the drivers, well check out the price of these 20 plus yr. old speakers and look at the price they're still bringing.. Another thing to remember 20 plus years ago we all had our favorite HI-FI shops that carried Great speakers, amps, Reel to Reel Decks and Turntables. There were no "Best Buy's" or your K-Mart Box complete systems like you have today.....So once again unless you are/were old enough to be "into audio equipment" you wouldn't know what was in some of these Audio Shops....I was, and holy **** most of you younger guy's wouldn't believe the great times "WE" had hanging out and listening in these shops as often as we could, and doing a lot of dreaming....
 

 


I grew up in the wrong decades. frown.gif

 

post #42 of 177
Quote:
Originally Posted by bcasey25raptor View Post




I grew up in the wrong decades. frown.gif

 


Maybe bcasey25raptor, but what I hate most for you and the other younger dudes is the stupid crazy prices that many manufacturers are charging for most of the better high end equipment these days. There's so much mark up on most gear it's just friken insane...... They wonder why many people don't "get into" high end audio........ Gee let's all count the reasons, 1) The outrages prices...... It seems like they would rather sell a thousand units for 40 grand then 50 to 100 thousand units for 5 grand and that still out of reach for most people..... But one great thing your generation can enjoy are the Hi resolution downloads and a lot more Headphones and related gear!wink.gif   PS. better get back on topic-------- BASS

 

post #43 of 177

People like bass because it is like they first sound they heard... the beating of Mom's heart.   It's primal.

post #44 of 177

http://www.osha.gov/pls/oshaweb/owadisp.show_document?p_table=standards&p_id=9735

 

I've had to do some work with OSHA sound exposure limits before and remembered seeing this graph.  The lines delineate volume at which hearing protection must be provided.  So it appears 1-8 kHz is most damaging range for human ears based on this graph, and that this range was used to develop the table below it indicating the duration vs decibels of noise exposure during work.

 

EDIT: I forgot to address the topic of the thread.  Why do people like bass so much? They want to feel the music in their kidneys, not just their ears.


Edited by NecroNeo - 9/24/11 at 10:24pm
post #45 of 177
Quote:
Originally Posted by ph0rk View Post

 

Most consumer-level stereos 20 years ago couldn't really reproduce bass very well, so decent bass was striking. One of the most notable things for me when I saw my first live rock performance was the bass. In my feet, in my chest, etc.

 

If you listen to the lower registers you want the whole band in balance, and if you listen quietly you want some recession in the midrange.

 

Recall a guitar's low E fundamental is around 82 hz, an electric Bass's is 41. I don't want to pretend I can hear the fundamental, I want it there.

 


I've read in more than one place that low bass causes less overexcitement of the ear as you tend to feel it rather than hear it, which was the reasoning between the bassless dBA curve. And, of course, your earplugs aren't going to stop bass anyway.

 

We tend to be most sensitive in the midrange (as anyone who has been annoyed by a baby crying nearby can attest), and as I understand it this is where loss becomes evident first.

 

Of course, idiots with 130 dB car stereos going full blast are the exceptions that prove the rule. I have always found excess treble fatiguing, while excess bass is merely wrong.

 


 

I'm offended by that. Mine was 143.6 when mic'd at a competition. That was years ago, and now have nothing of the sort in my car. 

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