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Why do people like bass so much? - Page 2

post #16 of 136

Couldn't tell you. I prefer headphones that have quality bass but not much of it. K-1000, Etymotic.

 

It gets in the way for the most part. 

post #17 of 136
Quote:
Originally Posted by bcasey25raptor View Post





Treble for me = Guitars and Vocals

 

Guitars and Vocals for me = music.


But real life has bass too...balanced in proper proportion with the mids and the treble. But just goes to show that we're all looking for different things.

 

post #18 of 136
Quote:
Originally Posted by MacedonianHero View Post




But real life has bass too...balanced in proper proportion with the mids and the treble. But just goes to show that we're all looking for different things.

 


I like there to be bass but i prefer it to be on the levels of Grado.

 

post #19 of 136
Quote:
Originally Posted by bcasey25raptor View Post




I like there to be bass but i prefer it to be on the levels of Grado.

 


Which ones? SR-60s or HF-2?

 

post #20 of 136
Quote:
Originally Posted by MacedonianHero View Post




Which ones? SR-60s or HF-2?

 


My ms1

 

post #21 of 136
Quote:
Originally Posted by bcasey25raptor View Post




My ms1

 



Gottcha. I prefer the bass presence of the HF-2s (and then the RS1s).

post #22 of 136
Quote:
Originally Posted by bcasey25raptor View Post





Treble for me = Guitars and Vocals

 

Guitars and Vocals for me = music.



Music is boring without percussion, a rhythm.

 

Percussion needs a little oomph.

 

Further, many instruments can produce sounds into the bass registers, even a guitar, voice, or cello. They sound better when you don't have rolloff at 100 hz, if you ask me.

post #23 of 136
Quote:
Originally Posted by ph0rk View Post





Music is boring without percussion, a rhythm.

 

Percussion needs a little oomph.

 

Further, many instruments can produce sounds into the bass registers, even a guitar, voice, or cello. They sound better when you don't have rolloff at 100 hz, if you ask me.



I never said i like no bass i just like it to be flat with a boost to the treble.

post #24 of 136
I blame popular music for the bassheads. Before about 20 years ago, most popular music wasn't this heavy. Yes, there were bass guitars and kickdrums, but nothing like what we have today.

Even worse, concerts have been turned up to ear-damaging levels (I often wear earplugs) just like how it is at bars and clubs. I've heard that the point is to stamp out conversation because people buy more drinks when they can't talk.

Then there are the cheap subwoofers found in cars and HTIB systems.

Thanks to the music, live events and typical reproduction devices, people expect a big thump from what they're listening to. Accurate or not, it is now expected. People buy gear that thumps so manufacturers make what sells.

It's a vicious circle. I keep hoping that acoustic material makes a comeback. Not all of the bass-enhanced music is bad, but a lot is.
post #25 of 136

great thread.

 

i, for instance, can listen to dark headphones all day long.  where treble is downplayed considerably.

but, i can hardly tolerate bass-light headphones.

 

why is that?

 

well, since i'm an architect, i'll use an architectural analogy:

 

the strong response to bass is because it's the foundation of music. 

as others have pointed out, rhythmic elements - the very pulse of music - are typically in the lower register.

and, if these foundational elements are missing, then the music sounds bereft of musicality.

 

on the other hand, treble is like the crenulation on top of a building.  it's the fanciful looking cornice work that caps off a skyscraper.

if it's there, then it's a nice thing to have.  it's the element which connects us with the sky and air...  but, if done poorly, can be blindingly abrasive.

 

And, obviously, between those two is the midrange - the soul of music.  The walls, doors, windows.  All those live in the midrange....

 

 

post #26 of 136

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Uncle Erik View Post

I blame popular music for the bassheads. Before about 20 years ago, most popular music wasn't this heavy. Yes, there were bass guitars and kickdrums, but nothing like what we have today.

Even worse, concerts have been turned up to ear-damaging levels (I often wear earplugs) just like how it is at bars and clubs. I've heard that the point is to stamp out conversation because people buy more drinks when they can't talk.

Then there are the cheap subwoofers found in cars and HTIB systems.

Thanks to the music, live events and typical reproduction devices, people expect a big thump from what they're listening to. Accurate or not, it is now expected. People buy gear that thumps so manufacturers make what sells.

It's a vicious circle. I keep hoping that acoustic material makes a comeback. Not all of the bass-enhanced music is bad, but a lot is.


Honestly, I don't think some of the bassheads are listening as loudly as the rest of the community. Some bassheads are treble-sensitive so they generally listen at quieter volumes. Treble is much more damaging than bass on our hearing.

 


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by TheWuss View Post

great thread.

 

i, for instance, can listen to dark headphones all day long.  where treble is downplayed considerably.

but, i can hardly tolerate bass-light headphones.

 

why is that?

 

well, since i'm an architect, i'll use an architectural analogy:

 

the strong response to bass is because it's the foundation of music. 

as others have pointed out, rhythmic elements - the very pulse of music - are typically in the lower register.

and, if these foundational elements are missing, then the music sounds bereft of musicality.

 

on the other hand, treble is like the crenulation on top of a building.  it's the fanciful looking cornice work that caps off a skyscraper.

if it's there, then it's a nice thing to have.  it's the element which connects us with the sky and air...  but, if done poorly, can be blindingly abrasive.

 

And, obviously, between those two is the midrange - the soul of music.  The walls, doors, windows.  All those live in the midrange....

 

 


I agree completely.

 

post #27 of 136

what's wrong with loving both? not a problem for me.....love listening to Grado, mdr-7506 and xb700tongue.gif. No way I'm going to listen to trance with the grados, and metal sounds like crap with the xb700. Each music has its own best way to be heard.

post #28 of 136

Because they wanna "make it bump" like it does "in da club"? tongue_smile.gif


 

post #29 of 136
Quote:
Originally Posted by wind016 View Post

 


Honestly, I don't think some of the bassheads are listening as loudly as the rest of the community. Some bassheads are treble-sensitive so they generally listen at quieter volumes. Treble is much more damaging than bass on our hearing.

 


 


I agree completely.

 


Do you have proof to back this up?

 

post #30 of 136
Quote:
Originally Posted by bcasey25raptor View Post




Do you have proof to back this up?

 



Not really a scientific proof be since treble are of higher frequencies I guess it should be more damaging ?

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