Head-Fi.org › Forums › Equipment Forums › Sound Science › Why do people like bass so much?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Why do people like bass so much? - Page 9

post #121 of 177
And about your "racial memory", there have been tests that show differences in perception of "reality" in various cultures, and even environments. It wouldn't surprise me if there would be differences in perception / preference for bass in various cultures, and maybe even in men and women.
Edited by TonyVier - 10/31/13 at 9:33pm
post #122 of 177
As a person who damaged his hearing previously specializing in bass heavy car audio setup I love music so much I chose acoustics as a major in college. It is right to say bass Is more of a primal response the way our nervous system responds to lows. However I agree that HF do more damage in hearing loss but what broke my drums was LF thumps. Preference however in percentage based on my experience especially for the regular jills and joes is always with bass, not the quality bass but the air moving ones thats why most bass setups nowadays is more focused on how to move air rather than getting the biggest size. Personally I prefer neutrals when testing and just wait on how the audio engineers of a particular music track intended me to hear the sound. Id go with the feel I get on each music thats why I am more towards well arranged music. But when I am at a party id like to feel the air moving ones too...
post #123 of 177
Quote:
Originally Posted by TonyVier View Post

Oh, yes there is a lot of proof that "genetic memory" exists.

There is?  Want to link to some research or evidence?

Peopel have skills preferences, as you call it, but there's no proof to suggest these are inherited.  How would you know?  I mean..  if someone is predisposed to be a musician, it's not something you'll realise until the child is older.  There's no way you can tell if this was something they were born with :)  Hearing music in the child's formative years coudl easily create a predilection for music.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by TonyVier View Post

But not only genetically determined abilities/preferences are in play, although they are a prerequisite. Also aquired preferences and learning are:

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/10/131030185525.htm

As birds have their mating sounds "build in" we have a lot "build in" as well. Of course this is not a literal memory, it's a pre-disposition.

A pre-disposition is just that...  it's not genetic memory.  You linked to an article about babies learning in the womb...  well that's not racial memory.  There's no evidence that I know of to suggest that any of this is racial memory.  Did I inherit my dislike of olives??   LOL..  how can you prove that? 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by TonyVier View Post

And about your "racial memory", there have been tests that show differences in perception of "reality" in various cultures, and even environments. It wouldn't surprise me if there would be differences in perception / preference for bass in various cultures, and maybe even in men and women.

 

I know..  but again, this is nothing to do with racial memory.  It would be no more a racial memory than other perceptual shifts in other cultures.   The Chinese cultural belief that red is a lucky colour for instance..  that's just a preference.  Certain tribes of indigenous people appear to not be able to tell certain shades of colour apart, whereas we can quite easily. There are loads of such examples.  These are not racial traits either..  it's a product of environment.

post #124 of 177
I didn't take your racial or genetic "memories* literally. We have genetic determined behavior and preferences, and there are, as you say, cultural differences.
post #125 of 177

Agreed :)

post #126 of 177
Quote:
Originally Posted by pookeyhead View Post

Agreed smily_headphones1.gif

Except on the olives. Olives are yummy!
Edited by TonyVier - 11/1/13 at 4:05am
post #127 of 177

You need help :)

post #128 of 177
Quote:
Originally Posted by TonyVier View Post

Probably the answer to why people like bass is somewhere to be found in our evolutionary history. Maybe the drums in Africa as someone suggested, (as a sign of safety in the community, a sense of belonging).

This may give a clue:

http://www.theguardian.com/science/audio/2008/aug/18/science.weekly.podcast


I believe our fascination with bass has much to do with our instincts. Bass is powerful and seems large (it is, but being a visual society...). Reinforcing this is the common knowledge that big things make low sounds. Being able to associate ourselves with the big and powerful makes us think we are big and powerful. My take anyway.

post #129 of 177

For me it's much more simple, I just love feeling that bass, feeling it gives it another level of satisfaction/engagement and you can't feel mids or highs unless it's "pain" from too high volume levels. I start more easily nod, tap my foot etc. when I get that feeling of pounding bass and that's what brings the real satisfaction for me when listening to music (in this case hardstyle music which is probably why I enjoy that genre so much). Different people listen for different purposes, I'm not into analyzing music (which is a typical audiophile thing) but to wanna get the feeling of needing to dance along with the music which is where the bass helps for me, the more engaging the more I enjoy.

Of course it's important also hear all vocals, synths etc clearly in my case with the optimal timbre so I want both big bass + well balanced mids & highs range especially which is hard to find with basshead headphones, it's almost always the case you have to sacrifice some parts, Q40 that I use sacrifice soundstage + airiness but those aren't the highest prioritized sonical aspects for my personal taste why Q40 offers a lot for me for a very little pricetag.

Those that live under the same roof as me are quite accustomed to some "foot tapping noise sensation from upstairs". :p


Edited by RPGWiZaRD - 11/5/13 at 11:27am
post #130 of 177

'Why do people like bass so much'

 

I can't understand it. 

post #131 of 177

Most pop songs or music that is popular among people who have little interest in Hi-Fi is generally quite simple/repetitive and played on extremely poor equipment. Lots of bass can make it seem as though there is more going on, disguising the technical failures. It is far easier to make a car that looks like it sounds good like that too. I do not really understand the bass obsession but that is my speculation. I prefer a flat to slightly mids centric presentation. I had a eargasm to Ensiferum's Raised by the Sword reading this thread and now I am listening to their other songs just getting lost in the complexity which I could not do if there was too much bass or not enough treble. 

post #132 of 177

kids ascribe to the theory that "more is better".

post #133 of 177

Why do people like mids so much? :rolleyes:

post #134 of 177

Why do audiophile like highs so much? Especially the ear piercing highs like in the Beyers, or Ultrasone, or AKG, etc? Do they not hear these frequencies? 

Why do audiophile headphones have to look like torture device when you wear them? Is it mandatory? Did jigsaw make them?

Why do portable audiophile headphone have 10 foot cable? Is it suppose to be a belt also? Or a whip for S&M?

Why do people like IEM so much? Do they also like wet willy?

 

It boggles the mind. :blink: Let's try to explain it with a scientific hypothesis, or......

 


Edited by RoMee - 11/6/13 at 7:11am
post #135 of 177

Hahaha RoMee, awesome post!

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Sound Science
Head-Fi.org › Forums › Equipment Forums › Sound Science › Why do people like bass so much?