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Grado SR225.

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 

Hello,

 

Love my SR80 headphones. These headphones can sure boogie!  These are very addictive headphones !!!q  !gs1000.gif

 

Just wondering, does the SR225 have that ''fun'' sound like the SR80?

 

Kind Regards.

 

 

post #2 of 11

It certainly does. In fact, most Grado headphones share a very similar sound signature (particularly in the Prestige series, the higher-end models offer bigger sound signature differences). The SR225 won't be a huge improvement over the SR80 though... If you are looking to upgrade, consider first switching to some different pads (look around, there are many threads about this here). 

post #3 of 11
Thread Starter 

What about the SR325is, are they a huge improvement over the SR80?

 

Regards.

post #4 of 11

Heya,

 

After comparing the SR60's to the SR325's, I find the Grado ladder in the entry and mid-tier is a very big plateau. Which really is a way of describing the SR60's to be very good considering what they cost. The incremental increases in sound over their base model is very miniscule in my opinion. I did not find a big difference. I noticed subtle differences.

 

You know what made both Grados sound tremendously different, literally, night and day different? The ear pads. I tried the flats, the Lcush and the Gcush, as I have all three for my Grados. And frankly, the sound is crazy different depending which pad you're using. The SR60's in my case sounded so much better with the Lcush pads. The Gcush pads were more comfortable, but even the 325's lost bass impact and reverb with the Gcush pads and the highs got really tizzy and hot.

 

So what I'm saying is, if you haven't already, get yourself some $20 Lcush pads for your SR80's and don't bother spending $200 on new headphones unless you just really want to spend that much for a tiny upgrade, so to speak. I know some will say they are not, but I try to be fair about it, and I bought two Grados just for that comparison and literally think the steps are quite small (like most headphones frankly) to the point where I would say that an SR80 with Lcush pads is pretty much all the Grado you need unless you have a very wide open budget and are willing to pay hundreds more for maybe a 2% increase, and that's being generous, sound. Frankly I pay more just for build quality and style, which is why I got the 325 (it's gold and made of a metal, not plastic, like the SR60). But I am quite serious that the sound difference between the two is not that different, and I honestly don't think the 325 is worth the $300 price tag over the SR60's $80 price tag. $20 Lcush pads made a bigger impact on a more fun robust sound. The 325 was merely refinement, and quite a small appreciable difference. Again, merely my opinion.

 

Very best,

post #5 of 11
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by MalVeauX View Post

Heya,

 

After comparing the SR60's to the SR325's, I find the Grado ladder in the entry and mid-tier is a very big plateau. Which really is a way of describing the SR60's to be very good considering what they cost. The incremental increases in sound over their base model is very miniscule in my opinion. I did not find a big difference. I noticed subtle differences.

 

You know what made both Grados sound tremendously different, literally, night and day different? The ear pads. I tried the flats, the Lcush and the Gcush, as I have all three for my Grados. And frankly, the sound is crazy different depending which pad you're using. The SR60's in my case sounded so much better with the Lcush pads. The Gcush pads were more comfortable, but even the 325's lost bass impact and reverb with the Gcush pads and the highs got really tizzy and hot.

 

So what I'm saying is, if you haven't already, get yourself some $20 Lcush pads for your SR80's and don't bother spending $200 on new headphones unless you just really want to spend that much for a tiny upgrade, so to speak. I know some will say they are not, but I try to be fair about it, and I bought two Grados just for that comparison and literally think the steps are quite small (like most headphones frankly) to the point where I would say that an SR80 with Lcush pads is pretty much all the Grado you need unless you have a very wide open budget and are willing to pay hundreds more for maybe a 2% increase, and that's being generous, sound. Frankly I pay more just for build quality and style, which is why I got the 325 (it's gold and made of a metal, not plastic, like the SR60). But I am quite serious that the sound difference between the two is not that different, and I honestly don't think the 325 is worth the $300 price tag over the SR60's $80 price tag. $20 Lcush pads made a bigger impact on a more fun robust sound. The 325 was merely refinement, and quite a small appreciable difference. Again, merely my opinion.

 

Very best,



Hello,

 

Very interesting!

 

Do you have a pic of the Lcush pads? Are they the big ones?

 

Regards.

 

post #6 of 11

I've owned SR-60s, SR-80s, and SR-225s, and compared them extensively with comfies, bowls (L-cushion) and Senn 414 pads.

 

Bottom line, I currently own the SR-225s but in hindsight wish I had sold them and kept the 60s.

 

  • SR-60s were great fun cans. Very warm sound, great tone, just made everything sound good.
  • SR-80s were 95% identical to the 60s with the same pads. They had a tiny bit more detail in the highs (but not much), and a tiny bit more bass (but again, you would only notice this if you had both pairs side by side).
  • SR-225s are a big step, but it's not necessarily up. I find the 225s have similar slam and impact to the 60s and 80s, but have a huge amount more high frequency detail. Listening to the 60 and the 225 side by side, the 60 sounds almost like it is clipping vocals and high freq sounds.

 

However; the big thing I notice about the 225s that is the reason why I now want my 60s back is that their extreme highs make the entire can sound tinny. The 60s, in my opinion, sounded more full.

 

It really depends on what kinda music you listen to; if you listen to stuff where having a really strong mid-bass and sub-bass is important, I honestly don't think the 225s will be much of an improvement over the 80s you have. If you listen to stuff where the detail is king (i.e. acoustic guitars, instrumental type things that require crispness), the 225s will shine.

 

For me, I have Senn HD-580s (and now 600s) for my really detailed stuff, and to be frank I find that they do everything better than the SR-225s. I don't ever remember thinking the 580s bested the SR-60s in everything.

 

I would really like to listen to one of the woodier Grados (i.e. HF-2 or RS), but from my limited experience the SR-60/80 is the Grado I would get and hold on to. Instead of spending the extra money climbing the Grado tree, for my own musical tastes I would get something more technically brilliant to satisfy other genres :)

post #7 of 11
Thread Starter 

Thanks for your opinions, guys.

 

Hope you guys don't mind me changing the subject a little.

 

I'm also a little curious about the older Grado SR100 headphones. How old is this Grado headphone now? Is the SR100 still any good?

 

Regards.

post #8 of 11
Thread Starter 

BUMP.

post #9 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by TDL-speakers View Post

BUMP.



Never tried them or seen them - highly unlikely that will change without a stroke of 4 leaf clover luck.

 

If you see them at this price though - you've got nothing to lose, this is from an old Polk Audio thread

 

SR100 For Sale

 

"Yes, I am downsizing...cleaning out unused gear. "My loss is your gain," "smoke free home," have cats but they use the Sennheisers.


Great headphones....excellent condition. New foam. Band might be a little loose.

You might find some reviews on these...they are about 15 years old....time goes fast.

I would guess they have about 20 hours of use....I got wireless and then some Denons early on.


$30 shipped to CONUS"

post #10 of 11

 



Quote:
Originally Posted by TDL-speakers View Post

Hello,

 

Love my SR80 headphones. These headphones can sure boogie!  These are very addictive headphones !!!q  !gs1000.gif

 

Just wondering, does the SR225 have that ''fun'' sound like the SR80?


I have, and have had both the 60 and 225. My SR60 was my first Grado and I think fun, addictive, and can boogie are good adjectives to describe it. A little over a year ago I got a 225 and thought at the time that the 225 sounded fuller, bolder, airier, but verry, very similar. So I ended up sending it back to headroom and trying something else. That headphone however, the Denon d2000 wasnt very much fun, and couldnt boogie, so back it went too. My Grado journey then continued with an MS2i which I sold to buy an HF2, modding and woodying my SR60 then getting a another 225 to woody. To some extent I think having 3 pairs of Grado's is ridiculous, but it's a hobby and I enjoy it. The differences between my 3 Grado's is very nuanced. All three have a different timbre to them, and provide a different presentation but I could be happy with any one of them. I think the the one that offers the biggest bang for your buck though is the 225.

 


 

 

post #11 of 11
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by KneelJung View Post



 




I have, and have had both the 60 and 225. My SR60 was my first Grado and I think fun, addictive, and can boogie are good adjectives to describe it. A little over a year ago I got a 225 and thought at the time that the 225 sounded fuller, bolder, airier, but verry, very similar. So I ended up sending it back to headroom and trying something else. That headphone however, the Denon d2000 wasnt very much fun, and couldnt boogie, so back it went too. My Grado journey then continued with an MS2i which I sold to buy an HF2, modding and woodying my SR60 then getting a another 225 to woody. To some extent I think having 3 pairs of Grado's is ridiculous, but it's a hobby and I enjoy it. The differences between my 3 Grado's is very nuanced. All three have a different timbre to them, and provide a different presentation but I could be happy with any one of them. I think the the one that offers the biggest bang for your buck though is the 225.

 


 

 


 

Sounds very interesting!

 

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