Head-Fi.org › Forums › Equipment Forums › Headphones (full-size) › Cost VS. SQ Improvement
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Cost VS. SQ Improvement - Page 2

post #16 of 31

How big should the SQ improvement be if I jump from 50 euro Steelseries Siberia to 150 euro Sennheiser HD 598?

I bought this now but I don't notice a big improvement at all, maybe no improvement whatsoever. :-(

 

Is it just a tiny little improvement from a cheap to a decent priced headset? Or should I clearly be hearing a difference even if I'm not an experienced person when it comes to audio?

post #17 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hevan View Post

How big should the SQ improvement be if I jump from 50 euro Steelseries Siberia to 150 euro Sennheiser HD 598?

I bought this now but I don't notice a big improvement at all, maybe no improvement whatsoever. :-(

 

Is it just a tiny little improvement from a cheap to a decent priced headset? Or should I clearly be hearing a difference even if I'm not an experienced person when it comes to audio?


You need a amp for the HD598, so the price would be even more added onto the headphones.

 

Lowest priced amp for the HD598 area probably the FiiO E11

 

post #18 of 31

Why need amp for HD598? What does this do?

post #19 of 31

I'd just like to throw in my 2 cents about some of the issues mentioned here...

 

@MalVeauX - I really liked your post, I think you just brought some hard truth to these forums. A lot of people do live in a fantasy land here over on Head-Fi, and while it might be OK for them to give in to placebo and claim to hear 'night and day' differences between cans, this is not necessarily the way to go for all people. Case in point - lets look at the Superlux HD668B and the Beyerdynamic DT990. The Superlux is intentionally made to sound like the DT990, even Superlux confirms it on their website. The two cans have virtually identical frequency response graphs. The Superlux costs about 30$ and the DT990 is a 200$+ can. When I recently compared the two (I own the DT990 and borrowed the Superlux), I could definitely tell that they sound extremely similar, with the Superlux being slightly worse in the bass range (probably caused by the sub-par earpad quality). Still, I definitely realized then that with the Beyers, I'm not so much paying for the sound quality as much as the build quality and the general luxurious feeling that comes with owning a well-built, classy piece of equipment. The music sounds more refined with the Beyers not because there is some drastic difference in the drivers used but because the experience itself is more refined do to factors other than sound quality....

 

Naturally, it is OK for someone who has a lot of money to buy headphones that cost 1000$ and more if it makes them happy; however, the actual difference in sound quality is definitely the smallest improvement that you get from such a can. You upgrade your listening experience much more vastly than the sound, thats all I'm saying. 

 

However, if you don't want to spend more than, say, 200$ on a can, you can definitely get something that will only sound marginally worse than the big boys. Your experience won't be as luxurious but the sound will be awesome all the same (if you are able to overlook the bias that luxury imposes on you).

 

So yeah, thats my rant over. To the OP: what you pay for is mainly build quality and luxury, two things that have marginal effect on the sound but can definitely improve the general experience of using the can. The SR60i is a fine can but its sound quality can certainly be topped, but I wouln't go higher than about 200$ or so, depending on the company.

post #20 of 31
Thread Starter 

Okay so I think I am ready to get one more pair of headphones that will fill in the time until I win the lottery or something.

 

I have decided to get closed ones since I will use my SR60i at home.  I can also use a closed pair for recording purposes when overdubbing.  Comments in tis thread has convinced me that I shouldn't spend more than $300.  So I've come up with 3 pairs that are slightly different in cost but around the $200 range.  But since I already have a pair of SR60i, I do want a pair that will sound "better" (whatever that means) and have a different sound signature from Grados.

 

I do need good isolation from outside noise although I do understand that it won't be like IEMs.

 

Possible suspects in order of price (well in Canada anyway):

 

- Sony MDR-7506 or 7510

- Audio-Technica ATH-M50

- AKG K271 MKII

- Sennheiser - HD25-1 II

 

Which one will give me a different (or better) sound than my Grado SR60i? 

post #21 of 31

Scratch the M50 off your list unless you want a bulletproof built can that lends itself to pop and electronica

fairly well. If you listen to jazz or rock then expect a downgrade in SQ from the 60i.

post #22 of 31
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gwarmi View Post

Scratch the M50 off your list unless you want a bulletproof built can that lends itself to pop and electronica

fairly well. If you listen to jazz or rock then expect a downgrade in SQ from the 60i.



I know for SR60i are very good for their price but I didn't realize that a $80 pair can compete that well with $180 pair of headphones.  I guess in a way they have different sounds and depending on what I am listening to they'll be a downgrade.

 

I am looking for a more natural sound overall and a bit better sound than the SR60is.  I guess it's hard because when you compare open headphones with closed....it's like apples and oranges in a way.

post #23 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by Centropolis View Post

I know for SR60i are very good for their price but I didn't realize that a $80 pair can compete that well with $180 pair of headphones.  I guess in a way they have different sounds and depending on what I am listening to they'll be a downgrade.

 

I am looking for a more natural sound overall and a bit better sound than the SR60is.  I guess it's hard because when you compare open headphones with closed....it's like apples and oranges in a way.

 

Exactly, it's such a subjective hobby at the end of the day - to my ears the M50
never sounds natural, I am constantly reminded on fine 24/96 material that I am listening

to a closed can sound. My 325i occasionally tricks my mind if I'm concentrating on

something else!

 

I've tread your path before and I opted for the AKG K601 - it is enough of a change from

my Grados. Airy, light, 3D sound stage with middle row presentation - they do need an amp though.

 


Edited by Gwarmi - 9/17/11 at 8:03pm
post #24 of 31

 

@MalVeauX & @jupitreas

From Malveaux

Quote:
Diminishing returns happens as fast as the $40 mark honestly. There is absolutely a reason to get headphones that cost more than $500. But it has to be a change that you're willing to pay for. [...] I just don't care so long as the sound is good and it's great to listen to, I don't care if it's $900 or $30.


From jupiteras

 

Quote:
So yeah, thats my rant over. To the OP: what you pay for is mainly build quality and luxury, two things that have marginal effect on the sound but can definitely improve the general experience of using the can. T

 

eek.gif  Ouch this hurts, but sometimes I'm  wondering after listening to the ksc75, if I've shouldn't have stopped to them.

But there are some specificity  to sound that makes experience with each headphone interesting.

For instance I was impressed by the smoothness of my hd595, and the bass of my senn IE7.

 

So even if I was not "wowed" by my last $200+ can , I 'll take the time to learn its strengths and weakness. It's about fun, I  guess . Perhaps one day, I  would find something so good, that I wouldn't want to listen to something else. Or my ears would become too old before.

post #25 of 31

Jupitreas has a good point, but I think that if you get the same sound from a can that cost $80 and one that cost $300 but the build quality in the second is more luxurious and with high quality materials, for sure I'll pay the extra bucks; I really don't want to buy each year that $80 headphone because they tear appart.

A big factor in every hobby is that many stuff is or can be collectible, that gives you a certain status. But that can be very arguable too.

Of course the gap between HPs gets smaller and more subjective as the price goes up, technically most of the headphones will reach a point in wich they can render music in almost a flat response curve, but builders take advantage of the expertise and create a certain sound signature. 

I think that if you feel you nailed "The Right" headphone you're lucky, just be wise and test other gear too, the beauty in this hobby is that WOW factor when you rediscover your favorite song.

post #26 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by paconavarro View Post

A big factor in every hobby is that many stuff is or can be collectible, that gives you a certain status.


The hd800 comes to my mind, with their weird look. I'm wondering if their design is just here to seduce buyers, or if it's useful. And also how many people prefer cheaper headphones (even if they can afford the hd800).

 

post #27 of 31

@extrabigmehdi I cant elaborate too much on the HD800 because I've never been close to them :) but also Im an Industrial Designer,  so Im pretty sure that they pushed as much as possible to keep the balance between the use and form, Sennheiser is very aware of the niche they aim for and as a big corporation they dont spend the money on things that wont sell good.

 

About the cheaper headphones you must remember that in the HD800, T1, 701, LCD2, SR-007/009 etc. tier, you must think on a system not only in the headphone by itself, so that could be a deal breaker for some buyers.  ;)

post #28 of 31

@extrabigmedhi

 

A lot of people question the $2000AUD out here for a pair of HD800's. The sound signature is very flat and on some sources/material it can

appear very bright. Personally, if you're into jazz, acoustic and orchestral then they make a lot of sense. If you're a rocker and you pay for

these cans then I find that a little perplexing IMHO.

post #29 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gwarmi View Post

The sound signature is very flat and on some sources/material it can

appear very bright. Personally, if you're into jazz, acoustic and orchestral then they make a lot of sense. If you're a rocker and you pay for

these cans then I find that a little perplexing IMHO.


This description reminds me the srh940. There was someone endlessly arguing that the srh940 sounds the same as the hd800 ( but most people disagree) . But despite everyone say that the srh940 are good for jazz, I disagree ( Why would you want something bright when listenning to jazz ? But I'm thinking of Miles Davis in particular ).
post #30 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by extrabigmehdi View Post



This description reminds me the srh940. There was someone endlessly arguing that the srh940 sounds the same as the hd800 ( but most people disagree) . But despite everyone say that the srh940 are good for jazz, I disagree ( Why would you want something bright when listenning to jazz ? But I'm thinking of Miles Davis in particular ).


Well I'm biased in that I love my Grados for jazz - smallish soundstage, great brightish mids - really brings out the saxophone - all brass instruments sound great.

 

Here's another generalization that I find - darker headphones lend themselves to most electronic genres.

 

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Headphones (full-size)
Head-Fi.org › Forums › Equipment Forums › Headphones (full-size) › Cost VS. SQ Improvement